Rural round-up

November 26, 2014

Foreign investment in NZ helps fuel our growth – Andrew McGiven:

Returning from Federated Farmers National Council last week, we discussed the importance of how our provinces can work with the national organisation, as the grass roots part of the organisation. The Federation is focused and built from the member up.

So you, our members, here’s what the big ticket items were on the Federation’s agenda – employment, health and safety, science and innovation and the future or the primary industries.  Something to discuss and think about was the remit put forward by the Taranaki province on overseas investment. They want a comprehensive review of the current overseas investment policy, which is one of those issues that tends to divide views.

Regardless it needs to be discussed and understood where everyone’s coming from. . .

Farming on the roof of the world – Andrea Fox:

Mark Fagan farms in the Forgotten World.

The tourism label for the other-worldly landscape in the North Island’s Waitomo district is top of mind as I creep furtively around hairpin bends on a skinny road that would see one of us reversing for the rest of the morning if two vehicles met and happened to survive the encounter.

Fagan had forgotten to mention that accessing his world an hour inland west of Te Kuiti meant spitting gravel for miles, negotiating rock falls, an ironcast faith in his directions when hope of ever arriving – anywhere, today – was fast fading, or that city cars are out of their depth here. . .

Farmers revive seasonal lamb tradition – Gerald Hutching:

Bluff oysters and whitebait are two traditional delicacies that tempt the tastebuds at different times of the year.

Early season lamb heralding spring used to be celebrated by Kiwis in the same way, but the tradition has fallen by the wayside with the decline of independent butchers and the rise of exports to lucrative overseas markets.

Coastal Spring Lamb is a recent initiative aimed at turning the clock back to reacquaint local consumers with the joys of eating the first lamb of the season. . .

AWDT produces 50th graduate:  

 FOURTEEN WOMEN completed the Agri-Women’s Development Trust’s (AWDT) Escalator programme last week, bringing its total number of graduates to 53 since it began in 2010

 The 10-month programme came about after AWDT’s research into the role of New Zealand women in agriculture found low participation rates at leadership and governance levels. In an effort to answer this problem, the programme aims to develop women’s skills and confidence to govern and lead agricultural organisations and communities. . .

This year’s programme attracted women from Bay of Plenty to Southland who are involved in the dairy, honey, sheep and beef, animal health, agri-business and banking sectors.

Korean demand spiking early – Joanna Grigg:

Before the launch of the velvet cutting season talk among velvet traders was that prices may be up.
Velvet buyer Graeme Hawker of Hawker Deer buys velvet from growers across the South Island.
He said speculation on stronger prices for farmers has become a reality with initial buyers quoting $125-$130/kg for the traditional Korean mix. This is 15% up on the previous season’s initial price of $110/kg which, in turn, was 5% up on the year before.  . .  

Chance to represent NZ at Global Youth Ag-Summit:

New Zealand ideas wanted for feeding the world.

Chance to represent NZ at Global Youth Ag-Summit

Canberra to host

Feeding the world main topic

Calling New Zealand youth with a passion for agriculture – we want your ideas on how to feed a hungry planet…and we want them now!

That’s the message from Bayer New Zealand, which is seeking four youth delegates to represent New Zealand at the Global Youth Ag-Summit, to be held in Canberra, Australia, August 2015.

Applicants must be between the ages of 18 and 25 as of 24 August 2015. . .


Rural round-up

October 31, 2014

Seasonality drives the red meat industries – Keith Woodford:

I have previously described the challenges that seasonality creates for the dairy industry. For New Zealand’s red meat industries, those issues are even more constraining. It is a key part of the reason why restructuring the meat industry is so challenging.

Sheep are designed by nature to give birth in the spring, and their fertility is much reduced at all other times of the year. Given that the market predominantly wants carcasses of 17 – 20 kg, this means that most lambs are ready for slaughter between December and April, with the peak slaughter in a shorter period from January to March.

In practical terms, this makes impossible the development of a mainstream consumer products industry based on a 12 month supply of chilled lamb. Trying to configure the national industry in this way would lead to exorbitant production costs. . . .

Dam could lift region’s GDP by $54.5m:

A new report shows the gross domestic product of the Nelson Tasman region could be lifted by more than $54 million if a proposed dam is built.

The analysis by the New Zealand Institute of Economic Research has been released during a public consultation of Tasman ratepayers into the possible funding models for the Waimea Community Dam.

The report’s author, senior economist Peter Clough said his analysis suggested the benefits of the dam would more than cover the cost of its construction.

Nelson Economic Development Agency chief executive Bill Findlater said the Lee Valley project definitely stacks up. . .

Details about next Tuesday’s Ruataniwha water event:

Federated Farmers and Irrigation NZ have released more details about the free “Ruataniwha – it’s Now or Never” event, taking place from 7pm next Tuesday (4 November), at the Waipawa/Central Hawke’s Bay Municipal Theatre. 

“It is definitely not going to be a theoretical discussion about economic models, but real world examples of farmers and schemes with costs similar to what the Ruataniwha Water Storage Scheme proposes,” says Will Foley, Federated Farmers Hawke’s Bay.

“Instead of talking about an economic model, we’re bringing up farmers involved in the comparable cost North Otago Irrigation Company scheme and Mid-Canterbury’s BCI scheme.  . .

Sheep, beef farmers want big changes – Sally Rae:

West Otago sheep and beef farmers Nelson and Fiona Hancox want farmers to ”stand up and be counted” and take charge of their futures.

The couple, who are both passionate about the red meat industry and are involved with various groups and industry bodies, believe it is time for farmers to take control.

Mrs Hancox was nominated to attend the 2014 Rabobank Global Farmers Master Class in Australia next month, where she would have been joining farmers from around the world. . .

 

Maori agriculture selling itself short – Gerald Hutching:

Maori agriculture has “huge” potential for development but only 20 per cent of farmland is well developed, 40 per cent is underperforming, and 40 per cent is under-used, says a Massey University academic.

Lecturer and researcher and Kaiarahi Maori Dr Nick Roskruge said about 720,000 hectares of Maori land was farmed, returning $750 million a year, but its short-term potential was $6 billion.

Maori are most strongly represented in the sheep and beef cattle sectors, with dairying becoming increasingly important. About 15,000 Maori are employed in the sector. . .

Capitalising on a perfect partnership on-farm – Jon Morgan:

Rambunctious is the best name for this ram. He’s a big bruiser, used to getting his own way, and he doesn’t like being manhandled.

He struggles out of Peter Tod’s grip and makes a break for freedom. But the Otane farmer’s determination is stronger and the ram is wrestled into submission for a photograph.

He is picked out from a small mob as the most photogenic because of his open face, long back, well-shaped legs, sound feet, and meaty hindquarters. . .


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