Fleur honoured for service to food

January 2, 2013

Fleur Sullivan has been named as a Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit for her services to the food industry.

. . . Although Fleur’s Place was named by Cuisine magazine as one of the ”100 best things about New Zealand” in 2010, she said her abiding principle as a restaurant owner had always been to promote local produce, whether in North or Central Otago.

”Food is part of our identity and cultural heritage and the aim to keep the connection between the food we eat and the land [and] ocean it comes from preserves, supports and promotes a sustainable system.

”So it is great to be recognised at the grass-roots level for my contribution to this industry.”

Ms Sullivan is also a member of the New Zealand Restaurant Association’s Hall of Fame.

The award could also have been given for services to tourism.

Fleurs Place attracts visitors from all around New Zealand and the world.

The food lives up to its reputation for quality and freshness but Fleur is also a vital ingredient in the restaurant’s success.

Other southern rural people honoured include:

Emeritus Prof Roger Field, Wanaka, for services to education and land-based industries.

Emeritus Prof Roger Field has had a 41-year involvement with Lincoln University, where he promoted agriculture and the land-based industries of New Zealand as vice-chancellor. . .

Geoffrey Watts Neilson, Mosgiel, for services to agriculture.

Geoff Neilson (70) played a leading role in the eradication of the hydatids disease in New Zealand. . .

Peter Thomas Cummings, Lawrence, for services to agriculture and the community.

For about 50 years, Peter Cummings (70) has been ”very much” involved in serving his community. . .

Another recipient of an honour from the south is Dunedin poet Diane Brown who received an ONZM for services to writing and education.

. . . Brown has a long-standing voluntary involvement with the New Zealand Society of Authors (NZSA) and has tutored a wide range of creative writing courses.

She was creative writing co-ordinator and tutor at Aoraki Polytechnic from 2001 to 2011, taught creative writing courses at Paremoremo Prison and recently established Creative Writing Otago – an online creative writing school. Brown has published six books, including Before the Divorce we go to Disneyland (1997), Eight Stages of Grace (2002) and Here Comes Another Vital Moment (2006).

She has won the Michael King Writer’s Studio Inaugural Residential Fellowship (2005), the Montana Book Awards Best First Book of Poetry for Before the Divorce we go to Disneyland and the Buddle Findlay Sargeson Fellowship (1997) and was a finalist in the Montana Book Awards in 2003.

She also won the 2012 Janet Frame Memorial Award.

The south gained a new knight in the New Year’s honours list – Julian Smith, OBE is now Sir Julian.

The Dunedin businessman – the chairman and managing director of Allied Press, publisher of the Otago Daily Times – has been made a Knight Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit for his services to business. . .

Like most other successful business people he is also a philanthropist.

The full honours list is here.

Rural recipients, or those with rural links include:

Mr Mark Wiremu Solomon, of Christchurch. For services to Māori and business who was also knighted.

Mr John Kenneth Buck, OBE, of Havelock North. For services to the wine industry and the arts, CNZM.

Dr Philip Seabrook Yates, of Auckland. For services to agribusiness, ONZM.

Mr Ian Trevor Corney, of Taumarunui. For services to agriculture, MNZM.

Mr John Graham Hartnell, of Christchurch. For services to the community and beekeeping, MNZM.

Professor Vincent Ernest Neall, of Palmerston North. For services to Earth science, MNZM.

Mr Peter James Ombler, of Te Puke. For services to the kiwifruit industry, MNZM.

Mr John Raymond Wheeler, of New Plymouth. For services to the horse racing industry, MNZM.

Mr Ross Malcolm Gordon, of Methven. For services to Land Search and Rescue, QSO.

Mr Noel Dawson Anderson, of Riverton. For services to the Coastguard, QSO.

Mr Raymond Baker, of Auckland. For services to the Jewish community and the racing industry, QSO.

Mr Warren David Barker, of Fairlie. For services to the community, QSO.

Mr Frederick Charles Cooper, of Gore. For services to the community, QSO.

Mrs Mavis Jessie Davidson, of Owaka. For services to the community, QSO.

Chief Fire Officer Raymond Peter Dever, of Tolaga Bay. For services to the New Zealand Fire Service, QSO.

Chief Fire Officer Ian Moffat Lindsay, of Winton. For services to the New Zealand Fire Service, QSO.

Chief Fire Officer Robert James Lunn, of Greymouth. For services to the New Zealand Fire Service, QSO.

Every time the New Year and Queens Birthday honours are announced people think of those not included who would be at least as deserving.

Anyone can nominate someone for an honour.

Information on how to nominate someone and a link to the nomination form are here.

I have made two nominations.

One was successful the other, equally deserving and supported by references by a wide range of people, was not.

I am sure it had nothing to do with the worth of the nominee and everything to do with the then-government’s view of my political links.

I am pleased that this government sees beyond politics when recommending recipients of honours.


Unsung hero of hydatids eradication

September 15, 2012

Dog dosing used to be a regular occurrence for pets and working dogs.

The aim was to prevent the spread of hydatids which could be fatal in humans.

That we no longer have to worry about the disease is a great achievement.

The ODT reminds of us this in a profile of Geoff Neilson who played  a key part in eradication of hydatids.

The successful eradication of hydatids, a disease that caused significant numbers of deaths and hospital admissions in    New Zealand, was a great achievement – and one that went almost    unnoticed, Geoff Neilson says.   

      In 1971, Mr Neilson was elected to the Hydatids Council,  initially as a Young Farmers representative, and through his  involvement with the council contributed to both the      enhancement of sheep-meat quality and the eradication of the   disease. . .

Following the link above will take you to the rest of the profile of one of the unsung heroes to whom we owe gratitude for the eradication of hydatids.

NZ Farmers Weekly also has a profile.


Rural round-up

August 3, 2012
Federated Farmers’ top man enjoys exciting ride– Sally Rae:

He was the banker who became a farmer who became the president of rural lobby organisation Federated Farmers.

Now, a year down the track, Bruce Wills says he is very encouraged with the progress made since he was elected in July last year.

Mr Wills spent more than 20 years in the banking industry before the opportunity arose for him to return to the family farm, Trelinnoe, on which he grew up, to farm in partnership with his brother, Scott, eight years ago. . .

Professor excited about new role – Sally Rae:

Professor Claire Massey’s new role as director of agrifood business at Massey University brings together her interest in entrepreneurship and her agricultural background.

And it is a job that she could not be happier about. “I’m so excited about it, I really, really am,” she told the Otago Daily Times recently.

Brought up on a dairy farm at Karaka, near Auckland, she is also the great-granddaughter of former prime minister William Ferguson Massey, and the university’s namesake. . .

Farm database grows:

Two farm industry groups are joining the national farm database FarmsOnLine.

From September Ovis Management Ltd (OML) and Johne’s Management Ltd (JML) will share their farmer contact details with the database.

“This is the information that we already use in our work to manage and control sheep measles and Johne’s Disease in sheep and deer,” says OML/JML joint chairman Geoff Neilson, Dunedin. . .

North Island overtakes South Island as sheep central:

Federated Farmers is welcoming Beef+Lamb NZ’s Economic Service confirming declines in the national sheep flock and beef herd may now be at an end. It also confirms the North Island has become the dominant island for both sheep and beef.

“It shows what a couple of good back to back seasons can do for stock numbers and morale,” observed Jeanette Maxwell, Federated Farmers Meat & Fibre chairperson. . .

University Honours farmer:

Lincoln University has recognised the efforts of South Canterbury dairy farmer Alvin Reid, who’s given many years service to the university.

Mr Reid farms at Winchester, just north of Temuka, and has been awarded the Lincoln University Medal.

He has interests in five dairy and dry stock properties covering 1300 hectares.


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