Rural round-up

31/03/2021

500 migrant staff needed to fill labour shortage – Gerald Piddock:

Federated Farmers and DairyNZ are requesting the Government allow 500 migrant dairy staff into New Zealand to avoid a worker shortage in the new milking season.

These staff would fill positions in the mid to high skilled employment category that New Zealanders new to the sector or in lower skilled dairy assistant roles would be unsuitable for in time for the 2021-22 season, Federated Farmers employment spokesperson Chris Lewis says.

The request comes after the two organisations commissioned a survey in March to gain a better understanding of the staffing issues facing dairy employers.

That survey drew 1150 responses in just one week. . . 

Money versus morals – Robert Carter:

The continued conversion of hill country farmland to forestry is a trend concerning Robert Carter.

The 50 Shades of Green has led a good informative campaign about the spread of pines onto good hill country farmland, however I too feel compelled to say something before I become relegated to the state of a ‘quaint curiosity’ folks will pay to visit to see how things used to be in the good old days.

I’m referring to the steady and seemingly unstoppable conversion of our hill country breeding farms to hectares of pine trees for carbon sequestration purposes.

Just recently another couple of local farms succumbed.

The carbon investors, buoyed by our government policy, which encourages conversion in this market, are buying properties as they come up for sale. . .

Guardians of the land – Fiona Terry:

Innovating to advance is something that runs in the blood of those at Caythorpe Family Estate in Marlborough. Fiona Terry spoke to the Bishell brothers managing the business they hope will thrive for many generations to come.

As fifth-generation guardians of the land first purchased by UK immigrant David Bishell, Simon and Scott Bishell are continuing a long-standing tradition of diversification and trend-bucking to future-proof.

Their great, great grandfather was a farm labourer who arrived in Nelson in 1876, with his wife Mary and three children. He leased some land to grow pumpkins, and following a successful crop, purchased 50ha west of Blenheim township in 1880.

Within two years, and despite the hard mahi converting the flax-covered swamp land into a productive area, he became the first farmer in the country to grow red clover as a seed crop, commissioning the build of an innovative thresher to harvest. . . 

Product check: how to find the good oil – Jacqueline Rowarth:

As the tsunami of mail arrives in the inbox, through rural delivery or the internet, there can be some confusion in sorting whether the products and suggestions will be useful or not. Are the fliers marketing or science? How do you know whether adoption will be positive – or whether not taking up the offer will mean you drop behind?

For people swimming in a flood of information and trying to find the good oil, consider asking the following questions:

Is there a time limit or quantity limit on the offer? Fear Of Missing Out (FOMO) induces rash behaviour. The Auckland housing market makes the point…

What problem is the new thing solving? Do you actually have that problem? I was offered a product that would improve animal health on the farm. I replied that the farm owner is a vet. I was then told that the product would improve soil health. I replied that I am a soil scientist. At that point I was told that it would do other things as well…

Triple Whammy for 2021 Taranaki Dairy Industry Awards:

The 2021 Taranaki Dairy Industry Awards Share Farmer of the Year is no stranger to the programme, having won both the Farm Manager and Dairy Trainee categories in different regions previously.

John Wyatt won the 2009 Hawkes Bay/Wairarapa Dairy Trainee of the Year category and was named the 2015 Manawatu Farm Manager of the Year.

On Saturday night, he completed the category trifecta by winning the 2021 Taranaki Share Farmer of the Year.

The region’s annual awards dinner was held at the TSB Hub in Hawera with Diego Raul Gomez Salinas named the 2021 Taranaki Dairy Manager of the Year and Sydney Porter the 2021 Taranaki Dairy Trainee of the Year. . . 

Hawkes Bay/Wairarapa Dairy Awards winners announced:

The 2021 Hawkes Bay/Wairarapa Dairy Industry Awards Share Farmer of the Year winners believe a good team with a can-do attitude is vital to the success of their business.

Manoj Kumar and Sumit Kamboj were named the 2021 Hawkes Bay/Wairarapa Share Farmers of the Year at the region’s annual awards last night in Masterton. Other major winners were Leon McDonald, the 2021 Hawkes Bay/Wairarapa Dairy Manager of the Year, and Tony Craig, the 2021 Hawkes Bay/Wairarapa Dairy Trainee of the Year.

The brothers are 50/50 sharemilkers on Andrew and Monika Arbuthnott, Geoff Arends and Ester Romp’s 285ha, 460-cow Eketahuna property. They won $7,882 in prizes and four merit awards.

Both Manoj and Sumit have entered the Awards previously, with Sumit placing third in the 2018 Hawkes Bay/Wairarapa Dairy Manager category. . . 


Rural round-up

29/05/2011

Photovoltaic energy neutral grass based dairy farms – Pasture to Profit writes:

Two grass based dairy farmers in the Pasture to Profit Network(one in Herefordshire & the other in Brittany, France) have or are about to achieve “Energy Neutral” status (with regard to electricity use on farm). Both have installed solar panels on their farm shed roofs. http://www.solon.com/global/
Energy neutral status is where 100% of the energy that is consumed is actually generated by the farmer user. . .

Lancashire biogas plant is go – Paul at Business Blog writes:

A £3m farm-based anaerobic digestion plant in Lancashire has been officially “switched on”.

The Carr Farm plant, near Warton, will produce biogas from silage and energy crops grown on surrounding land to generate 800kW of electricity, enough to power more than 1,000 homes. . .

2010 kiwifruit season lifts return to growers:

A strong 2010 kiwifruit season has lifted total payments to growers above season forecasts, with a particular highlight being a significant boost in returns to GREEN kiwifruit growers over the 2009 season, ZESPRI’s 2010/11 financial results show.

Total returns to growers in 2010/11 improved from $849.0 million to $883.3 million compared to the prior year, an increase of four percent, with average Orchard Gate Returns to ZESPRI GREEN growers increasing nine percent to $32,234.

Net global kiwifruit sales increased one percent to $1.511 billion in 2010/11, despite the global volume of ZESPRI(r) Kiwifruit sold falling one percent in the same period. . .

Daily grind taking for the dairy farmer

The alarm clock shrills. It’s half- past-bloody-four and another farming day is under way.

At least it’s not raining, but he still needs the Swanndri. It’s cold. And actually the farm could do with some rain. Too dry; too wet. Seldom just right.

It’s a long haul to the shed from this night paddock. Always a toss-up whether to go for the best feed overnight and accept extra distance and time required in the morning.

He pressures the tailenders with the farm bike and acknowledges there are times when a dog might come in handy. The heifers at the back of the mob are playing up a bit, skirmishing across the track, head-butted by a few dominant older girls in the herd.

The lights in the shed snap on, a startling line of illumination ahead in the rural darkness, so Toni will be washing down the concrete, getting organised. . .

Hat tip: Lou at No  Minister (The comments on his post make interesting reading too).

Payout good for NZ – Sally Rae writes:

“It’s a great time to be a farmer.” South Otago farmer Stafford Ferguson was responding yesterday to Fonterra’s announcement of a record payout for the season.

Describing the news as very positive, Mr Ferguson said it was a good time to pay debt back, while the forecast third-highest payout on record for next season “just eases pressure” looking forward a year out . . .

Win from Wheelchiar special – Sally Rae again:

Grant Calder pulls no punches when he says “life in a wheelchair is a bit of a s … “.

However, he hopes his remarkable success at the recent South Island sheep dog trial championships will send a message to disabled people that “it’s not the end of the world”. . .

Find true quality? The scan man can –  more form Sally Rae:

Peter Clulee is enjoying a well-deserved break.

Mr Clulee, who operates Otago Ultrasound, doing both eye muscle and pregnancy scans on sheep, has had a hectic few months.

Since the end of January, he has been travelling the South Island doing muscle scanning, working as far north as Blenheim and right down to Southland. . .

Sir Michael Fay still milking it – Bevan Hurley writes:

Sir Michael Fay, one of the country’s richest men, has swapped the bank for the barnyard and bought a $9.2 million slice of New Zealand’s dairy heartland.

The investment banker and island owner now lists “farmer” as his occupation when filling out immigration forms. . .

Strawbwerry pav pigues US media interest

 

Luxury Queenstown hotelier The Rees and New Zealand Trade and Enterprise have showcased the country’s fine wine and cuisine at US culinary institution The James Beard Foundation, described by Time magazine as the “Oscars of the food world”.

 

The event, dubbed “Flavors of New Zealand”, was hosted by New Zealand’s consul general in New York, and included a themed luncheon followed by an evening banquet featuring handpicked ingredients from 14 producers, matched with wine varieties from eight vineyards represented by Complexity Fine Wine Group. . .

An insatiable thirst for knowledge

Each day, as he goes around the dairy farm he manages, checking on the health and welfare of his human and animal friends and the land they share, Jason Halford carries with him two other dairy farmers.

“Geoff Arends is on my left shoulder and Bruce McCluskey is on my right,” he says. “I look at each situation and think what they would do. One day I’m Geoff, another I’m Bruce.”

They are the farmers who have influenced him most in the 17 years since he left school at 16 to go into dairying. . .

 


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