Rural round-up

July 2, 2018

Mycoplasma bovis: battle fatigue is growing but Government claims to be resolute – Keith Woodford:

Last week I was in Wellington speaking to Federated Farmers Dairy Council.    It gave me an opportunity to assess persistent rumours that Government and MPI were losing confidence in relation to the Mycoplasma eradication battle.

I heard both Acting Prime Minister Winston Peters and Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor say that they were resolute in their determination to eradicate the disease. Whether or not public positions and private concerns coincide could be another matter.

Everything I heard reinforced my concern that there is a gulf between the information MPI is providing Government and the realities of the situation. . . 

IHC calf scheme could be culled due to M bovis – Rachael Kelly:

A fundraising scheme that raises more than $1m a year for the IHC could become a victim of the Mycoplasma bovis outbreak.

Since 1984 about 4,000 farmers nationwide have donated cull cows, steers, bulls, heifers, calfs, bale of wools, lambs, sheep, goats, and deer  to the charity.

The stock is then sold and the proceeds are donated to IHC.

But farmers raised concerns about the scheme at a meeting in Gore last week, which was hosted by MPI, Beef & Lamb NZ and Dairy NZ, saying the IHC’s stock sales could transmit M. bovis between stock, therefore transferring it between farms. . .

Loss of wool training organisation keenly felt – Sally Rae:

The demise of Te Ako Wools is a “significant blow” for the wool industry, Federated Farmers says.

The organisation, which was launched in Alexandra in mid-2016, was owned by the New Zealand Shearing Contractors Association. It worked with Primary ITO to provide industry training, including shearing and woolhandling.

Training, attracting and retaining people in the industry had continued to be a challenge, Federated Farmers meat and wool chairman Miles Anderson and policy adviser Sarah Crofoot said in their report to the organisation’s national conference in Wellington last week. Finding staff had become increasingly difficult and the situation was expected to  continue over the next five years, making training “all the more important”. .  .

Big cheeses from UK and US cleared to buy farms in NZ – Martin van Beynen:

Two titans of niche agricultural markets in America and England are investing in New Zealand after getting approval from the Overseas Investment Office (OIO). 

American millionaires Margaret and Gary Hirshberg, who are from New Hampshire and in their early 60s, have been cleared to buy 69ha in Ngatimoti, near Motueka, to set up an organic sheep farm and an organic market garden. They also intend to do extensive native planting. 

The sellers, Andrew Guy and Rowan and Sharon Kearns, got $4m for the property. . . 

No monsters – science backs the safety of GMO foods:

Remember all the warnings about genetically modified organisms? They’re bad for us; they harm the environment; there is too little oversight; they fail to increase yields; and they will do little to help feed the world.

GMOs are plants and animals whose DNA has been modified by genetic engineering. The process has allowed researchers to develop corn that can survive drought, soybeans that stand up to weed killer, virus-free papayas, and potatoes that don’t bruise — in short, countless varieties of crops that yield more and cost less to grow. That’s good news for farmers and for our food supply. . . .

Lightening strike kills a dozen cows sparks strange Facebook posts – Wyatt Bechtel:

A lightning strike on a ranch in Oklahoma was not only a tragedy for the owners, but it also turned into a reminder of the lack of knowledge most people have about livestock production.

Jason Donathan, a cattle rancher from Henryetta, OK shared a photo with KOTV Channel 6 in Tulsa showing approximately 12 dead cattle under a tree. The group of primarily cows was killed by a lightning strike.

KOTV meteorologist Lacey Swope shared the picture on her Facebook page on June 24. . .

 


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