Rural round-up

August 15, 2012

Australian dairy farmers follow the money – Dr Jon Hauser:

Ten years ago there was a general belief in the industry that dairy farmers would respond to low prices and low profitability by producing more milk. This is a sort of perverse defiance of the laws of supply and demand where the reverse is supposed to happen. The reality of this adage is that some farmers produced more milk, and others sold out or shut down the dairy. During the 1990’s the net effect of this was industry growth. Since 2002 the trend in Australia has been the other way – an ongoing decline in milk supply. This article is not however about the causes of declining production. It is about how to encourage milk supply and, despite the evidence to the contrary, that is exactly what has happened during the autumn and winter periods of production in the southeast. . .

Forestry harvesting machine wins national innovation award:

A non-scientist has won a major forestry research award for his key role in developing a new harvesting machine designed to be safer and more productive on steep slopes.

Kerry Hill, Managing Director of Trinder Engineering Ltd, of Nelson, is one of five winners of the second annual Future Forests Research Awards, presented at a function in Rotorua on Tuesday 14 August.

Mr Hill was one of four nominees for the award for innovation that adds value to the forestry sector. The three judges cited Trinder Engineering’s joint development with Kelly Logging Ltd over the past three years of a winch-assisted steep slope feller-buncher machine. Innovations include a front mounted winch, rear mounted blade and integrated hydraulic control systems. . .

Farm Transactions Slow As Seasonal Workloads Take Priority:

Data released today by the Real Estate Institute of NZ (“REINZ”) shows there were 55 more farm sales (+18.3%) for the three months ended July 2012 than for the three months ended July 2011.  Overall, there were 356 farm sales in the three months to end of July 2012, compared with 406 farm sales in the three months to June 2012, a decrease of 50 sales (-12.3%).  On a seasonally adjusted basis, after accounting for normal seasonal fluctuations, the number of sales rose by 0.7%, compared to the three months to June.

1,439 farms were sold in the year to July 2012, 50.4% more than were sold in the year to July 2011.  The number of farms sold on an annual basis is now the highest since April 2009.

The median price per hectare for all farms sold in the three months to July 2012 was $17,955; a 22.6% increase on the $14,649 recorded for three months ended July 2011, and an increase of 2.2% on the $17,565 recorded for the three months to June 2012. . .

The Shed At Northburn Station Appoints Experienced Wine Professional As General Manager:

Northburn Station’s The Shed has appointed wine and hospitality expert Paul Tudgay as General Manager underlining the company’s commitment to enhancing the events and conference and incentive sector of its operations, focusing around its purpose-built facility, The Shed Restaurant, Cellar Door and function venue.

Tudgay (40) is a professional sommelier, trained in the UK, and for the past five years has had a high profile as a Queenstown Resort College wine educator and more latterly as its Hospitality and Business manager. He is also credited with introducing the international Wine and Spirit Education Trust qualification to Queenstown, with more than 80 people qualified to date.

Northburn Station owners Tom and Jan Pinckney  opened The Shed four years ago with Jan taking on the diverse role of  overseeing The Shed including the restaurant, cellar door, functions and the company’s trade wine business. . .

Young Farmer elected to FCANZ Board

New Zealand Young Farmer member Mark Lambert has been elected to the board of the Fencing Contractors Association of New Zealand (FCANZ). FCANZ is an industry organisation that supports and benefits the fencing industry of New Zealand.

The 2012 FCANZ AGM was held at the Waipuna Conference Centre, Auckland on 27, 28 and 29th of July. There were eight nominees for seven spots on the board which went to a vote and Mr Lambert was elected for a one year term.

A group of dedicated fencing contractors launched The Fencing Contractors Association of New Zealand Inc. (FCANZ) in February 2006. . .

New Animal Welfare Regulations Affect Producers & Processors:

New regulations coming into force next year mean that the export meat industry will need to train all staff in animal welfare and quality issues appropriate to their jobs.  Supermarkets in the EC and UK, and their customers, want to be assured that livestock are treated humanely at all stages of processing.

In particular they are concerned that the procedures used in handling animals on farm, during transportation and from reception at meat plants through to stunning and slaughter are painless and cause as little distress as possible, according to Dr Nicola Simmons, General Manager of Carne Technologies Ltd. . .

Winter delivers too much of a good thing:

Prolonged wet weather and surface flooding is causing concern on-farm during a very busy period in the farming calendar, with calving and in some pockets, lambing, underway.

“I know when we hit a long dry spell farmers will look back at the rain longingly. But what many need right now are days or weeks of fine settled weather to dry out,” says Katie Milne, Federated Farmers Adverse Events spokesperson.

“The only way to describe much of rural New Zealand is sodden and there’ll be plenty of people in the towns and cities who’d probably agree. Farmers are hoping for a decent fine spell in order for saturated pasture to recover. . .

Hoping indeed with all fingers and toes crossed. It stopped raining here (North Otago) late this morning, the sun is trying to shine through the clouds and there are streaks of blue sky appearing.


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