Rural round-up

July 26, 2018

Virgin Australia hunting for New Zealand’s best meat – Sally Rae:

Virgin Australia has taken a not-so-subtle dig at rival airline Air New Zealand by launching a campaign to find New Zealand’s “finest meat supplier”.

Earlier this month, Air New Zealand announced it would be serving the plant-based Impossible Burger as part of its business premier menu on its Los Angeles to Auckland flight.

That attracted ire from many in the rural sector, who believed the airline should be pushing the country’s premium products. . .

Young Vinnies show farmers their support – Sally Rae:

Otago Rural Support Trust chairman Gavan Herlihy was “blown away” to receive handmade cards from school pupils to be distributed to farmers affected by Mycoplasma bovis.

Members of the Young Vinnies at St John’s School in Ranfurly were to be congratulated for the caring gesture, Mr Herlihy said.

It was a very stressful time for those affected and he expected receipt of the cards – which he was distributing on the pupils’ behalf – would be both treasured and appreciated. . .

Dairy herds may change from black and white to brown and brindle – Keith Woodford:

In coming years, we are likely to see the colour of New Zealand dairy cows change from predominant black and white to a mix containing more brown and brindle.  It will be a response to changes in the relative price of protein and fat.

Black and white Friesian cows produce about 1.2 kg of fat for every kg of protein.  In contrast, the brown Jerseys produce about 1.4 kg of fat for each kg of protein. Jersey milk is also richer with less water.  Jersey milk is about 5.7 percent fat whereas Friesian milk is about 4.5 percent.

For many years, protein has been worth a lot more than fat, but in the last two years that has changed. Milk protein prices are the lowest they have been for many years whereas fat prices are at record highs. This is the reason why butter is now so expensive in our supermarkets. . .

Third world water restrictions may be introduced if Waimea Dam canned – Cherie Sivignon:

Water tankers may be needed on the streets of Brightwater during severe droughts if the Waimea dam project is shelved.

“We’ll be slipping into Third World provisions [in a severe drought],” said Tasman district mayor Richard Kempthorne. “I think, the community doesn’t realise that’s what we have ahead of us without the dam.”

Kempthorne said he expected to be accused of scaremongering but the rules for tougher rationing in dry spells were in place under the no-dam provisions in the Tasman Resource Management Plan (TRMP). The rationing and related restrictions would affect rural and urban water users in the Richmond, Hope, Mapua, Brightwater and Redwood Valley areas including businesses and industry. . .

Govt to appeal landmark negligence finding in Psa case – Sophie Boot:

(BusinessDesk) – The Crown will appeal last month’s High Court’s decision that the government was negligent in allowing Psa, the virus which devastated the kiwifruit industry, into the country.

Psa infected 80 percent of kiwifruit orchards nationwide and is estimated to have cost the industry up to $1 billion in lost exports. The growers’ group, called Kiwifruit Claim, sought more than $376 million in compensation. The group of 212 growers, led by Strathboss Kiwifruit and Seeka, claimed the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry – which was merged into the Ministry for Primary Industries in 2012 – was negligent under the Biosecurity Act. . .

Horticulture holds reduced levy

Horticulture growers voted to keep the levy at its current rate, at the Horticulture New Zealand Annual General Meeting (AGM) in Christchurch today.

“Last year, we proposed reducing the levy by 0.01% to 0.14% (14c per $100 of sales) and this year, we recommended maintaining that rate,” Horticulture New Zealand Board Chairman Julian Raine says. . .

Young Farmer event wins national award:

An event bringing the country to Wellington has won a national award

A ground-breaking event which brought the country to the nation’s capital has received a sought-after award.

Wellington hosted the Taranaki/Manawatū Regional Final of the FMG Young Farmer of the Year in February.

The contest was organised by Wellington Young Farmers and has been named the country’s best regional final in 2018. . .


South Devon/Friesian X sirloin NZ’s best

May 18, 2011

A South Devon/Friesian X sirloin steak from Phil Hoskin in Pahiatua was judged New Zealand’s tenderest and tastiest in the 2011 Beef + Lamb New Zealand Steak of Origin competition.

Twenty finalists, carved down from nearly 400, were tasted by a panel of judges at the grand final today during the Beef Expo in Feilding.

The judging panel comprised Commonwealth Gold Medallist Alison Shanks, All Black Legend Richard Loe, food writer and television personality Julie Biuso, radio host Jamie Mackay and top chef, Graham Hawkes.

Each steak was assessed on aroma, juiciness, tenderness, texture and taste.

Head judge and chef, Graham Hawkes said the competition just keeps growing and the entries just keep getting better.

“The quality of New Zealand beef is simply the best and the entries this year were no exception,” says Hawkes.

The Grand Champion was awarded the prestigious Beef + Lamb New Zealand Steak of Origin Trophy, the original Beef Carcass shield and $5000.

The supreme brand award went to Bowmont Wholesale Meats in Invercargill with their Hereford Prime entry.

The Steak of Origin contest has been run for more than eight years on behalf of Beef + Lamb NZ .

 The competition process involves an initial assessment of the sirloin steak at Carne Technologies in Cambridge. Each steak is aged for three weeks before being tested for tenderness, pH and % cooking loss. The most tender steaks make the semi-final and are cooked and tasted by a panel of judges in Christchurch. The finalists (four from each of the five classes) are tasted at the Beef Expo in Feilding by top chefs and celebrities to find the most tasty and tender steak in the country.

The full results of the final:

Class 1: Best of Breed – European
1st: Rob & Mary Ann Burrows, Culverden (Charolais), processed at Ashburton Meat Processors
2nd: Charlie Stephens, Christchurch (Piedmontese) processed at Ashburton Meat Processors/Ellesmere Butchery
3rd: Cornwall Park, Auckland (Simmental), processed at Auckland Meat Processors/Wilson Hellaby
4th: TD & BR O’Shea, Whangarei (Limousin), processed at Auckland Meat Processors/Wilson Hellaby

Class 2: Best of Breed – British
1st: DC & LJ Redmond, Rakaia (Angus) processed at Ashburton Meat Processors
2nd: Robin & Jacqueline Blackwell, Inglewood (Angus) processed at Taranaki Abattoir
3rd: Tim & Kelly Brittain, Otorohanga (Angus), processed at Auckland Meat Processors/Wilson Hellaby
4th: Tim & Kelly Brittain, Otorohanga (Angus), processed at Auckland Meat Processors/Wilson Hellaby

Class 3: Best of Breed – Crossbreed & Other
1st: Phillip Hoskin, Pahiatua (South Devon/Friesian X) processed at Silver Fern Farms, Hastings
2nd: Nigel Foster, Kaitaia (Angus X) processed at Silver Fern Farms, Dargaville
3rd: Kate & Paula Jordan, Blenheim (Charolais/Jersey X) processed at CMP Kokiri
4th: Julia & Stewart Eden, Gore (Dexter/Friesian X) processed at Alliance Mataura

Class 4: Best of Brand – Retail
1st: Bowmont Wholesale Meats, Invercargill (Hereford Prime)
2nd: Foodstuffs, North Island (AngusPure)
3rd: Glanworth Partnership, Pahiatua (AngusPure)
4th: Chef’s Choice, Wanganui (AngusPure)

Class 5: Best of Brand –Wholesaler and Foodservice providers
1st: Angus Meats, Christchurch (Angus Reserve)
2nd: Progressive Enterprises, Auckland (Countdown Finest Angus)
3rd: Land Meat NZ Ltd, Wanganui (AngusPure)
4th: Neat Meat, Auckland (AngusPure)

On a related matter, rivtettingKate Taylor has been at the Beef Expo and is all beefed out.


Limousin win carcus contest

July 16, 2008

High yielding limousin cattle won the top awards in the Otago Southland carcus competition.

A 342kg steer finished by Allanton farmer Doug Lindsay was named the champion and winner of the Alan Dodd Trophy while a 290kg heifer bred by Rob Johnstone, of Outram, was reserve champion.

Ironically, the champion steer was also bred by Mr Johnstone, who has farmed the Glencairn Limousin stud for the past 23 years.

Mr Johnstone said the limousin was capable of producing twice as much ribeye muscle area — the most expensive meat on an animal — than traditional cattle breeds.

Thirty-two entries were received in this year’s competition, up on last year’s 27 entries.

The cattle were judged on the hoof and then on the hook by judge and supervisor grader Mervyn Wilson.

There were some nicely finished cattle, Mr Wilson said.

However, Mr Wilson said the fat cover on some of the cattle was less than the desired range of 3mm to 10mm, which he attributed to the drought and a shortage of feed.

They could have done with a fraction more fat, he said.

Mr Lindsay, who has won the Otago-Southland beef carcass competition at least three times previously, produced a near perfect score of 292 points out of a possible 300. His steer had a ribeye muscle area of 132 square cm while Mr Johnstone’s steer produced a ribeye muscle area of 118 square cm.

Mr Johnstone said there had been a recent resurgence in the limousin, a European terminal sire breed, that also crossed well with the Friesian, Angus and Hereford breeds.

I don’t think any other beauty competition would be looking for a fraction more fat 🙂


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