For The Fallen

25/04/2019


Lest we forget

11/11/2010

It’s 92 years since the armistice was signed to end the war that was supposed to end all wars.

. . . They went with songs to the battle, they were young,
Straight of limb, true of eye, steady and aglow.
They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted;
They fell with their faces to the foe.

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years contemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them. . .

From For the Fallen by Laurence Binyon.


Tuesday’s answers

20/04/2010

Monday’s questions were:

1.  Who said: “You, the mothers, who sent their sons from far away countries, wipe away your tears: your sons are now lying in our bossom and are in peace. And having lost their lives on this land they have become our sons as well.”? 

2. Who wrote “They went with songs to the battle, they were young/Straight of limb, true of eye, steady and aglow”?

3. Where in New Zealand was the first Anzac Day marked?

4. What did General Bernard Freyberg say when a British General observed, “Your people don’t salute very much, do they?”

5. Who wrote the poem In Flanders Fields?

Points for answers go to:

Paul scored three – and half a bonus for what I think is the first gratuitous mention of Oamaru in an answer.

David got two and a bonus for honesty.

Gravedodger got three right and a good try for “somewhere in the North Island” – that’s usually close enough for a South Islander 🙂

Kelvin got four right and a bonus for honesty.

And JC can have four on trust.

Tuesday’s answers follow the break.

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For The Fallen

24/04/2009

Today’s contribution to poetry month was chosen with Anzac Day in mind.

The fourth verse of Laurence Binyon’s For the Fallen, is usually recited at memorial services.

                    For the Fallen

With proud thanksgiving, a mother for her children,
England mourns for her dead across the sea.
Flesh of her flesh they were, spirit of spirit,
Fallen in the cause of the free.

Solemn the drums thrill: Death august and royal
Sings sorrow up into immortal spheres.
There is music in the midst of desolation
And a glory that shines upon our tears.

They went with songs to the battle, they were young,
Straight of limb, true of eye, steady and aglow.
They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted,
They fell with their faces to the foe.

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old;
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.

They mingle not with laughing comrades again;
They sit no more at familiar tables of home;
They have no lot in our labour of the day-time;
They sleep beyond England’s foam.

But where our desires are and our hopes profound,
Felt as a well-spring that is hidden from sight,
To the innermost heart of their own land they are known
As the stars are known to the Night;

As the stars that shall be bright when we are dust,
Moving in marches upon the heavenly plain,
As the stars that are starry in the time of our darkness,
To the end, to the end, they remain.

– Laurence Binyon –  


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