Rural round-up

January 7, 2019

The hypocrites at Fish and Game NZ – Alan Emmerson:

I received strong reaction to my blog on Fish and Game’s ‘survey’. Unsurprisingly I stick with everything I said.

I’d now add that the organisation is a rampant hypocrite. I did mention in my last blog that Fish and Game completely ignored the reports of 379 sewerage overflows into our pristine streams and rivers.

Was there any comment from the trade union – in a word no. . .

Pressure is on but dairy farmers’ fundamentals unchanged – Tim Mackle:

On the cusp of the new year, I’ve been thinking about the year gone and what’s head of us.

Having been involved in the dairy sector my whole life, it’s clear that it’s changed significantly since I was a kid. And in the past year, there have been a number of key challenges, whether it’s the talk about nitrogen – both from effluent or the manufactured variety – to help our grass or vegetables grow, our impacts and work to improve water quality or the growing conversation around climate change. And let’s not forget the emergence of new threats, like Mycoplasma bovis.

Here’s the thing about farming. The fundamentals are still the same – looking after cows, grass and people. . . 

Man disgusted at dumping of carcasses in South Canterbury river – Matthew Littlewood:

A South Canterbury man is disgusted to find rotting animal carcasses dumped near a popular swimming spot – and wants those responsible to own up.

Ely Peeti, of Waitohi, inland from Temuka, said he was taking his children to a swimming spot near Albury at Rocky Gully bridge on Friday when he found seven deer heads, a sheep skin and a gutted whole male pig, all lying in the water.

He told Stuff he was so shocked by his find that he posted a video online.

“I couldn’t believe the smell, it was just rotten. . . 

Resurgent collie club to hold SI champs – Sally Rae:

A few years back, the Omakau Collie Club was close to extinction.

It was only due to the tenacity of a couple of club members that it kept functioning and now, it has undergone a remarkable change in fortunes.

The club — now known as the Omakau-Earnscleugh Collie Club — is preparing to host the South Island sheep dog trial championships in 2021.

It will bring an influx of about 500 dog triallists into the Alexandra area for five and a-half days. . .

Meat meals an iron-clad rule – Tom O’Connor:

 In spite of our resolve most of us eat more than we need to and drink more than is good for us during Christmas and New Year gatherings.

That is probably because there is much more to food and drink than merely refuelling the body. We like to combine good food and beverages with the companionship of friends and family in a tradition that goes back a very long way in our history and folklore. . . 

A review of 6,000 studies over two decades delivers its verdict on GMO corn – Chelsea Gohd:

There is a great deal of misinformation out there regarding genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

From monikers like “Frankenfoods” to general skepticism, there has been a variety of biased reactions to these organisms, even though we as a species have been genetically modifying our foods in one way or another for approximately 10,000 years.

Perhaps some of this distrust will be put to rest with the emergence of a 2018 meta-analysis that shows GM corn increases crop yields and provides significant health benefits.

The analysis, which was not limited to studies conducted in the US and Canada, showed that GMO corn varieties have increased crop yields worldwide 5.6 to 24.5 percent when compared to non-GMO varieties. . .

 


Lag effect means no quick fix

January 8, 2018

A Fish and Game poll shows New Zealanders want more action on water quality:

Pollution of our rivers and lakes is one of New Zealanders’ top two concerns, according to public opinion poll results.
The findings are contained in a Colmar Brunton poll of a thousand people conducted for Fish & Game New Zealand.

The survey asked people how concerned they were about a range of issues, including the cost of living, health system, child poverty and water pollution.

Three quarters – 75 percent – of those surveyed said they were extremely or very concerned about pollution of lakes and rivers. Only five percent said they were not that concerned.

The only issue people were more worried about was the cost of living, with 77 percent saying they were extremely or very concerned. . . 

Fish & Game New Zealand chief executive Martin Taylor says the Colmar Brunton findings show how worried the public is about water pollution.

“These results are consistent with what we saw in the election and show the depth of feeling kiwis have about the loss of what they considered their birth right – clean rivers, lakes and streams,” Martin Taylor says.

“It highlights the urgency with which the government needs to make substantial changes to address the problem,” Mr Taylor says.

“People are fed up by pollution – particular by intensive corporate dairying – which has robbed them of their ability to swim in their favourite rivers and lakes. . .

My favourite lake is Wanaka where there have been no problems for swimmers this summer.

My favourite rivers are the Kakanui and Waitaki, both of which are in dairying areas. There have been no problems in the Waitaki and the high E. coli in a stretch of the Kakanui is caused by seagulls.

Fonterra and Dairy NZ should take note of these results. They show the tens of millions of dollars they’ve spent on slick PR to try and change people’s minds isn’t working,” he says.

Martin Taylor says the state of our polluted waterways is hurting New Zealand’s international image.

Does he not see the irony of saying this in a media release high on emotion and selective in its facts?

“Our clean, green reputation gives us a valuable international marketing advantage, but we have been squandering it.

“Losing our clean, green image means less tourism earnings and lower prices for our sheep and beef exports and other agriculture products. Why should all New Zealand farmers miss out on good returns because of dirty dairying?” he says.

Why should a whole industry be pilloried because of mistakes made in the past? This statement ignores all the work and the money which are being put into remedying those mistakes and ensuring current practices protect and enhance waterways.

Martin Taylor says fixing the problem is not going to be easy.

“This is a major challenge to put right. It’s going to take a lot of hard work and hundreds of millions of dollars to reverse corporate dairy farming’s environmental impact,” he says. . . 

Once again Fish & Game picks on dairying without mentioning the fouling of waterways by water fowl,  didymo which was introduced to New Zealand by fishers, pollution caused by tourists and trampers who urinate and defecate in or near waterways; and the problem of urban water pollution.

There is no dairying near Christchurch’s Avon River which is very polluted nor is there any near Takapuna Beach which was closed to swimmers last week.

The media release also ignores the lag effect which is examined in ‘Lag-effect’ politics and the politicisation of New Zealand farmers: Where to from here?, by Ronlyn Duncan of Lincoln University:

. . In terms of nitrates, the present state of water quality reflects what has occurred in the past and depending on biophysical, geological and management factors, movement into waterways can take decades. Often referred to as the ‘lag-effect’, this means it can take some time before the effects of land use intensification make their way through the groundwater system (Howard-Williams et al., 2010; LAWF, 2010, 2012; PCE, 2012; Sanford and Pope, 2013). Importantly, the same delay applies to improvements in water quality due to better farm practices and the implementation of stricter rules and regulations. Hence, the issue of concern in this paper is that the lag-effect can have potentially unforeseen social and political consequences. . . 

Those social and political consequences include the pillorying of farmers and farming by groups like Fish & Game using selective facts and lots of emotion.

The degradation of water quality is complex.

A lot of the practices doing the damage in urban waterways is still occurring. This could be fixed very quickly if there was the political will to spend the money necessary to deal with waste water and sewerage.

Most of the degradation of rural waterways occurred over a long period of time and in spite of considerable improvements in current farming practices, millions of dollars spent and a lot of on-going work, will take a long time to reverse.


Farmers foster fish

June 6, 2014

This makes a very pleasant change from the usual negative stories about dairying:

Dairy farmers are getting praise from unlikely quarters after the most salmon in 40 years have been seen spawning in a small stream in the middle of dairying country.

After identifying good salmon catches in the area during the angling season and higher spawning rates in lowland streams than normal, fishery officers did a spot check at the spring-fed Waikuku Stream, expecting to see little salmon activity.

In a small stretch of the stream which feeds into the Ashley River they found about 35 salmon and as many nests – redds – containing thousands of eggs.

Among other theories for the high salmon count, Fish & Game New Zealand think the main reason is the work of dairy farmers to fence, plant and protect the stream.

South Island spokesman Andrew Currie said it was pure chance they found so many salmon spawning in the stream and farmers deserve the credit.

“In a 200-metre stretch I walked there were at least 25 to 35 redds and that augurs well for the fishery because each one of these nests contains 3000 to 4000 eggs and we can see the day when the Ashley River returns to a good run. What was particularly pleasing by the find was that the stream was in the heart of a dairy farm.”

Currie said the “textbook” spawning site had free-running water, nice overhangs, little weed and an exposed shingle bed and was an example of top riparian planting by farmers.

“I think a lot more farms in Canterbury could have the same in their backyard if they had similar plantings and fencing.

“This is proof that dairy farming and Fish & Game can co-exist. . .

That is refreshingly positive and is appreciated by Federated Farmers:

Federated Farmers is thrilled to hear Fish and Game acknowledge the massive positive effect farmers Good Management Practice (GMP) is having on our waterways.

“Headline news in the Christchurch Press today reports farmers riparian management has resulted in the sighting of the most salmon seen spawning in 40 years, an acknowledgement that is huge for the farming community,” says Ian Mackenzie, Federated Farmers Water & Environment Spokesperson.

“The 35 salmon, nests and thousands of eggs found in the Waikuku stream, was smack bang in the middle of dairy farming land. Feeding into the Ashley River, this bountiful Canterbury stream is testament to allowing reasonable timeframes for farmers to fence and riparian plant their waterways.

“It is encouraging to see the results of farming coexisting with its waterways and heartening to have it acknowledged by Fish and Game. This is not an isolated event with similar reports in Ashburton of large numbers of salmon spawning in Spring Creek, tributary to the Ashburton River.

“This article is timely as I sat down to listen, after speaking at the New Zealand Primary Industry Summit today. It was the perfect parallel to reflect on the big picture of our industry and the correlation that it has with the economy. We are looking for ways to move forward in a sustainable way, as the most successful exporters in the world, but we have to make it right at home first and this is proving to be challenging.

“Each regional council is interpreting the requirements for the National Policy Statement for Freshwater management differently and in some cases every catchment, which will lead to an implementation nightmare. Whilst every region is different there needs to be a cohesive approach here and a standardisation of what is required.

“What we are seeing in the Waikuku stream, Spring Creek, and numerous others throughout the country, could be tenfold with a consistent and organised approach from Central and Regional Government,” concluded Mr MacKenzie.

Farming and healthy waterways which foster fish aren’t mutually exclusive.

Sustainability balance economic, environmental and social concerns and is achievable with good management practice from landowners and councils.


Rural round-up

May 28, 2014

Farmers prepare for payout cut – Sally Rae:

Five Forks dairy farmer Lyndon Strang isn’t expecting any surprises today when the dairy co-operative updates its forecast 2013-14 season payout.

A cut of between about 25c and 30c from the present $8.65kg ms farmgate milk price has been predicted by economists, while a conservative opening forecast for the 2014-15 season, around the $7kg ms mark, has also been suggested.

Mr Strang, who is also dairy chairman of North Otago Federated Farmers, said the 2013-14 payout was still going to be a record, and even a $7 forecast for next season was ”potentially still another good payout”. . .

Stream through dairy farm rich in fish – Tim Cronshaw:

Dairy farmers are getting praise from unlikely quarters after the most salmon in 40 years have been seen spawning in a small stream in the middle of dairying country.

After identifying good salmon catches in the area during the angling season and higher spawning rates in lowland streams than normal, fishery officers did a spot check at the spring-fed Waikuku Stream, expecting to see little salmon activity.

In a small stretch of the stream which feeds into the Ashley River they found about 35 salmon and as many nests – redds – containing thousands of eggs.

Among other theories for the high salmon count, Fish & Game New Zealand think the main reason is the work of dairy farmers to fence, plant and protect the stream. . .

A lamb chop fresh from the lab – Jill Galloway:

A retired Massey University horticulture senior lecturer says meat will come from the laboratory in future, putting New Zealand’s grazing systems at risk.

Dr Mike Nichols went to a conference in Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates, and said it was disconcerting to learn it was possible to “grow” a perfectly acceptable hamburger patty in the laboratory from plant-derived raw materials.

He said fillet steak and lamb chops of acceptable taste, flavour and texture were not far away. . .

Farmers prepare to pay for $90m irrigation scheme – Tony Benny:

Farmers supplied by the Rangitata South irrigation scheme intend to buy the scheme from the developer, says scheme chairman Ian Morten.

The scheme, which is expected to be in full operation next irrigation season, draws water from the Rangitata River in South Canterbury to fill seven huge storage ponds with a total capacity of 16.5 million cubic metres, three of which are now full or part full. Work completing the other four will resume after winter.

While initial investigation for a scheme on the south side of the Rangitata was started by a farmer group, it wasn’t until earthmoving company owner Gary Rooney joined them that the scheme took off. . . .

Making straight line into the top results:

Otago and Southland competitors did well in the New Zealand Ploughing Association’s (NZPA) national championships recently.

Hosted by the Marlborough Ploughing Association, more than 30 people took part in the national finals at Spring Creek, near Blenheim, from May 10 to 11.

The competitors were all winners from various qualifying events held throughout New Zealand in the past 12 months.

Mark Dillon, of Riversdale, was third in the Case IH silver plough section, and also won the W.G. Miller Trophy for the highest placed competitor aged under 35. . . .

A focus on changing fortunes: Minister to attend Open Day:

An Open Day is being held on Friday 30 May in Kaikohe to celebrate the ongoing collaboration between Lincoln University and Northland College. At the centre of this collaboration lies the recently signed Five Year Strategic Plan, designed to formalise the strategy for optimising the farming and educational opportunities from the neighbouring Northland College Farm.

In attendance will be staff and students, as well as key representatives from business and government; including the Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment, the Honourable Steven Joyce, who will be speaking at the event. . .

 


Honest conversation needed on waterways

May 15, 2014

Federated Farmers’ Waikato provincial president has responded to a response from Fish & Game NZ to his column on water issues:

Whilst I appreciate Fish and Game taking the time to respond to my article last week, they did not quite get the gist of what I was saying. They have ducked the issue of their lack of accountability and pulled a side angle out of thin air.

I am unsure where they read that I don’t support their investment in wetlands, I just don’t support them touting they’re doing it for environmental reasons when they are clearly in it for the sport. I would rather they spent 100 percent of their budget on wetlands rather than 20 percent, but just don’t pretend you are doing it for the environment. Fish and Game’s wetlands are for breeding game and supporting the population of introduced pests, however I am grateful for the natives that benefit from them.

The fundamental point I made in my article, which has also been misread, is that farmers need to buy licenses from Fish and Game to hunt ducks. Mr. Wilson may need to swot up himself on the nature of duck shooting as a sport and what the season is all about. Whilst he rightly pointed out that you don’t need to have a license if you are hunting on your own farm, he neglected to address the social aspect of hunting where you hunt on friend’s farms, and where Fish and Game makes their fortune. Opening weekend in particular is the height of social events for most farmers. As much as duck shooting is about getting rid of pests it is also about hunting with friends and without their license you would be fined or you could always resort to shooting together over Skype.

So yes we farmers are significant financiers of Fish and Game who, without a mandate, spend our license fees pushing their agenda in court.

One thing I do agree with Mr. Wilson on is that Lake Waikare needs some serious work. The farming community has spent approximately $3 billion on enhancing our environmental performance, but we are well aware there is plenty more to be done. Farmers and regional councils are working well together to rectify water quality issues and will continue to do so. Fish and Game conveniently overlooks the impact Koi Carp is having on Lake Waikare, let alone water fowl, and forgets to mention that Hamilton Lake is one of the worst water quality issues in Waikato with no farmland or stock near it.

This is a prime example of a double standard, where Hamilton Lakes’ deteoriating water quality has had no livestock near it for 50 years, yet hundreds of water fowl and is one of the unhealthiest waterways in the region. There is no shortage of information on where farming has to improve its impact on water quality, and we are, so pointing this out the obvious at this point is just plain petty.

What is left unsaid, or avoided, is why there is deteoriating water quality in rivers and lakes that have no farmland or stock around them. I would invite Fish and Game or anyone to answer that and tell me what investment or planning is happening to rectify those waterways.

Mr. Wilson, we would all do well to consider the water quality in the Waikato. The conversation here should be honest though. Between an organisation that breeds/protects water fowl and the primary industry, we all have our part to play. Let’s be honest in this and what part we are playing.

In the meantime, if the Government won’t make Fish and Game a voluntary subscription organisation, Fish and Game should try and acknowledge all its members in the work it does and part of that is engaging with them in a positive manner. We would welcome Fish and Game to our AGM next Tuesday, on 20 May, at the Hamilton Airport.

Houghton’s original column is here.

My post on it is here and I gave Ben Wilson, Chief Executive Fish & Game Auckland/Waikato Region the right of reply to it here.


Licence fees ammo for farmers’ critic

May 7, 2014

Farmers who hunt are helping Fish and Game NZ take pot shots at them, Federated Farmers’ Waikato provincial president James Houghton says.

Fish and Game will be laughing their way to the bank after Duck Shooting season kicked off on Saturday. With a compulsory subscription system, opening weekend for Duck Shooting season sees hundreds of licenses being brought from the organisation.

What irks me is that it is guaranteed revenue for Fish and Game with no need to service those who fund them. I am not against people paying for licenses but it is the way Fish and Game then uses the money that I find so unpalatable.

Most of Fish and Game’s subscribers are the very farmers that they spend the majority of their time submitting against and taking to court, trying to protect their hunting business. You can see the irony in an organisation that is focused on killing as a sport publicly banging their chests about the environment, then using the revenue they‘ve collected off farmers to frame an expensive argument, which protects their legislative gravy train rather than environment. . .

I am all for licenses to own and use a gun (gun license) as well as responsible hunting laws, but this system is not for the hunter this is all about revenue for Fish and Game, personally I would rather pay a Government organisation double what I pay Fish and Game than continue to fund their attack on farmers .

There is a bit of confusion here with the public perception that Fish and Game are an environmental organisation. Don’t be fooled – the wetlands they create are merely so they can breed more pests for us to pay them to shoot. I would say they are a self serving business rather than environmental stewards. There really is no difference between that and a hunting park – the animals are protected so they can build up a population large enough to be hunted at certain times of the year.  The ridiculous thing is that this doesn’t need to be legislated, farmers do this already, and with a clear enthusiasm for the sport it wouldn’t be hard to rustle up sponsorship to do exactly what Fish and Game do without the farce of pretending to care about the environment. If there was nothing to hunt there would still be an environment, but no Fish and Game.

In the Waikato, to help increase duck numbers, Fish and Game are shortening the duck shooting season. This to me shows their true colours – that they are not environmental stewards they are purely a hunting business. From my perspective the lack of ducks is a good thing for water quality going forward – do we really need more ducks?

Tests on water above and below farms with ponds often show it’s ducks and other water fowl which foul the water, not animals or farming practices.

With no accountability to those who pay their salaries, it is with a sour taste in my mouth that I will be duck shooting this season. Solution – I encourage the Government to either, create a voluntary subscription system ensuring our money is spent wisely, and that Fish and Game has a true mandate that represents its members, or alternatively remove them completely, stick to the hunting laws that already exist.

Fish and Game has damaged relationships with farmers over its actions subverting property rights on issues such as public access to private land and  tenure review.

It’s a sore point that farmers and their friends who buy licences to shoot pests subsidise court action and other campaigns against them.

They’re paying for the ammo their critics fire at them.


Rural round-up

April 30, 2014

PM turns first sod on Central Plains Water irrigation scheme:

Prime Minister John Key today turned the first sod of the $375 million Central Plains Irrigation Scheme near Hororata in Canterbury.

First conceived in 2001, Stage 1 of the 60,000 ha scheme is expected to deliver water to 20,000 ha of Central Canterbury in September next year.

Chief executive Derek Crombie said that the first major work on the $140m first stage, comprising the 17km-long headrace canal and bridges, will commence immediately, with construction of the 130km-long pipeline network picking up momentum mid-year.

“We expect to have up to 150 contractors working on a number of sites in the near future and to this end we are heartened by the experience of our two major contractors, Fulton Hogan/John Holland JV on the headrace canal and Downers, supported by subcontractors Aquaduct NZ Ltd, for the pipe network. . .

Construction begins on Central Plains Water irrigation scheme in Canterbury:

Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy has welcomed the official start of construction on the Central Plains Water irrigation scheme in Canterbury, which has the potential to create up to $1.4 billion in new economic activity.

“This is a proud day for the Canterbury region, with major benefits both economically and environmentally.

“When fully completed the scheme will irrigate about 60,000ha in the central Canterbury area, bounded by the Rakaia and Waimakariri Rivers, and the foothills and State Highway 1.

“It’s estimated there will be additional economic activity of between $1 billion and $1.4 billion created, an export boost of $300 million per year, and around 1,100 new fulltime equivalent jobs. . .

Sheep and beef farm profits forecast to increase 35 per cent:

Beef + Lamb New Zealand’s latest forecast, released today, tells a positive story for farmers and the wider industry.

The organisation’s Mid-Season Update predicts better pricing and strong demand for sheepmeat and beef products from key markets.

The report outlined improved product prices which are expected to drive average sheep and beef farm profit up by 35 per cent on the drought-affected level of last season. The Mid-Season Update estimates that farm profit before tax for the 2013-14 season will rise to an average of $113,700 per farm.

B+LNZ Economic Service Chief Economist Andrew Burtt says total gross farm revenue is expected to increase 9.2 per cent to $460,200, reflecting a 12 per cent increase in sheep revenue. Total farm expenditure is estimated to be up 2.8 per cent, to $346,500, on the back of increases in repairs and maintenance expenditures. Interest expenditure dropped by 2.6 per cent, thanks to a slight decrease in farm debt and lower interest rates. . .

The full report is here.

Agricultural footprint risks getting out of balance – Allan Barber:

While not exactly a new or revolutionary call for action, Fish and Game’s call last week for an independent review of water use and leaching into waterways was another bit of pressure on the future development of New Zealand farming. The organisation has long been agitating for such a review, but the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment’s critical report on land use and nutrient pollution in waterways has provided it with further ammunition.

Inevitably dairy is cited as the main culprit for the increase in pollution because stocking rates are higher and there is more runoff into rivers and waterways from dairy than from sheep and beef. Fonterra says it has collected nutrient data from nearly 4000 farms which will provide information on how to mitigate the impact of nutrients; in addition fencing of waterways is now an obligatory condition of milk collection, although Fish and Game questions how rigorously this is being audited.

According to modelling by NIWA and Motu Economic and Public Policy Research, by 2020 a further 400,000 hectares of sheep and beef farm land will have been converted to dairy. There will be a large increase in nitrogen runoff in most regions including Canterbury, Southland, Otago and Wellington. . .

Kiwi and Korean deer farmers to work together:

The deer industry plans to work with Korean deer farmers to further build demand for New Zealand deer antler velvet in South Korea, its largest market.

“The Korean Deer Breeders Association used to be opposed to velvet imports, but they now accept that by working together we can grow the pie for their farmers, as well as ours,” says Deer Industry New Zealand (DINZ) chief executive Dan Coup.

Long part of the allure of deer farming, with an Asian medical pedigree going back thousands of years, velvet has recently stepped into the modern era.

“In South Korea there is growing demand among affluent consumers for health foods and tonics based on traditional ingredients like velvet and ginseng. Because of New Zealand’s reputation for natural, safe and quality-assured product, respected Korean food companies see us as the ideal source of velvet,” Mr Coup says. . . .

Fonterra takes sustainable dairy farming to YouTube:

Fonterra Co-operative Group Limited is putting dairy farm water and environmental conservation in the spotlight with the launch of a series of YouTube videos focusing on responsible dairying initiatives taking place on New Zealand farms.

Entitled Farm Focus, the series begins today and will feature one farm every Wednesday for four weeks on Fonterra’s YouTube channel. The videos will also be posted on Fonterra’s Facebook and Twitter pages under the hashtag #farmfocus.

The four farms featured are from the central and eastern North Island of New Zealand. Each video accounts for one farm and the activities undertaken to protect waterways and natural resources while enhancing the economic viability of a farm. . . .

Birds are on the menu once more:

The 2014 Gamebird Food Festival is opening this Saturday with restaurants from Kerikeri to Invercargill opening their kitchens to cook either this year’s catch of duck, pheasant and quail, or commercially sourced birds.

So far 13 restaurants have confirmed they are taking part in this year’s Gamebird Food Festival to celebrate the hunting season, which opens on Saturday (3 May).

The aim of Fish & Game New Zealand’s Festival is to promote game birds as a delicious, free-range food source: Hunters can take their own birds into participating restaurants to have them prepared by professional chefs, or non-hunters can choose commercially sourced duck, pheasant or quail from the menu. . .

Yealands Family Wines wins ‘Green Company of the Year’ in leading global sustainability awards:

Yealands Estate has been selected as the “Green Company of the Year” by the UK’s leading drinks publisher, Drinks Business.

The Green Awards are the world’s largest programme in the drinks trade raising awareness of green issues and recognising those leading the way in sustainability and environmental practice.

Founder of Yealands Family Wines, Peter Yealands, says this global recognition is another welcome endorsement of their philosophy, culture and focus on continual environmental improvement. . .


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