Rural round-up

13/02/2016

Proliant’s Feilding plant expected to bolster Manawatu economy – Paul Mitchell:

Proliant’s new cattle blood plasma manufacturing plant in Feilding is expected to be a huge boost to Manawatu’s economy.

The $30 million plant takes blood from cattle and makes it into products such as diagnostic test kits and vaccines for research and in drug production.

It was officially opened on Friday by Economic Development Minister Steven Joyce.

Vision Manawatu regional manager Mark Hargreaves said the benefits to the region’s economy started two years ago with the plant’s construction bringing a lot of jobs to Manawatu contractors and freight companies.  . . 

Proliant Biologicals Opens New Zealand Facility:

Proliant Biologicals is proud to announce the opening of its New Zealand Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) manufacturing facility. The facility is located on the North Island of New Zealand, in Feilding.

The facility was designed and constructed to replicate the “Closed Loop” system, developed and instituted in Proliant’s U.S. facility located in Boone, Iowa. The equipment design and installation was done to functionally duplicate the systems in the U.S. facility, with critical processing systems coming from the same vendors used for U.S. installations. . . 

All about fariness – Neal Wallace:

Alliance Group is addressing inequality not accumulating fresh capital by deducting money from suppliers’ animal payments, chairman Murray Taggart says.  

From today the co-op will deduct 50c a head from lamb, sheep and calves, $2 a head from deer and $6 a head from cattle for shareholders who need to increase their shareholding to match their supply calculated on a three-year rolling average.  

Taggart said the move was about creating equitable shareholding and not a capital-raising move. . . 

MIE won’t get B+LNZ backing:

Two remits being presented by the Meat Industry Excellence to Beef + Lamb New Zealand’s annual meeting next month won’t get the industry-good board’s backing.  

The board considered both the remits and agreed not to support either, chairman James Parson said.  

In its push for reform, despite an agreement for Chinese company Shanghai Maling to buy into Silver Fern Farms, MIE last week notified two remits it would present to the B+LNZ meeting on March 23.  

The remits would be mailed with the B+LNZ voting papers this week with MIE chairman Dave McGaveston urging farmers to get thinking early. . . 

Dairy farmers visit Vatican for help – Chris McCullough:

European dairy farmers have reached out to Pope Francis for some spiritual blessing, in the hope it can help boost the ailing milk sector.

Around 140 dairy farmers, who are members of the European Milk Board, travelled to the Vatican in Rome to ask the Pope for some assistance.

They travelled from France, Lithuania and many other countries, all asking for the same thing, a future for their industry. . . 

Red wine and a dinner party – Grassroots Media:

I promise this isn’t a blog about the effects of red wine after a dinner party. Ok maybe it is, but not in the way you’re thinking.

In May 2015 I saw myself at a cross roads – ‘What did my future hold?’ I had a secure job, I was working with great people but felt I was missing a little something.

It turns out that little something, was a big challenge.

While having drinks with the Kellogg’s Rural Leadership cohort in Wellington, I came across participants of the Agri-Women’s Development Trust Escalator course, who were also enjoying a wine or two. There, I met two women who would eventually change the road I was travelling on. . . 

 

Food Tank: The Food Think Tank's photo.


Rural round-up

12/12/2013

Audacious goal on South Canterbury demo farm:

Beef + Lamb New Zealand’s demonstration farm programme is about testing new and exciting ideas within a real farm context. So, when Andrea and Warren Leslie from South Canterbury were invited to join the programme, they were challenged to share their ultimate on-farm goals during an initial workshop of demonstration farmers. Warren says he made the mistake of standing up first.

“I said ‘I want to lamb 200 per cent’ and people said that’s not such a big deal. Then I added ‘without any triplets or singles’.” That quietened them. He wasn’t finished. The cattle goal was more challenging again: “We breed Murray Greys and sell a lot of bulls into the dairy industry. Wouldn’t it be great if 75 per cent of our progeny were male? I’m just putting it out there, to get the discussion going.” . . .

Fonterra farmgate milk price mixed blessing:

Farmers will have split views on Fonterra Cooperative Group confirming the farmgate milk forecast at $8.30 per kilogram of milksolids (kg/MS). While they will be pleased with that confirmation they will be less pleased to see the dividend forecast being cut by two-thirds to ten cents per share.

“The dividend is a direct marker to the financial performance of Fonterra as a company,” says Willy Leferink, Federated Farmers Dairy chairperson.

“Farmers will be happy to see the milk price confirmed but since 85 percent of the dividend payout goes to farmer-shareholders, they will have mixed feelings since it’s a 22 cents per share haircut.

“But knowing what my farms have produced in the season to date, it’s no surprise to find that Fonterra has been pushed to process what our farms have produced. . . .

Synlait Milk flags faster growth in 2014 as Fonterra cuts guidance – Paul McBeth:

(BusinessDesk) – Synlait Milk, the milk processor which joined the NZX in July, says earnings will beat guidance next year on cheaper raw milk prices and growing demand for its products. That contrasts with Fonterra Cooperative Group, which today slashed its guidance in the face of a margin squeeze.

International demand is favouring Synlait’s milk powder and anhydrous milk fat products, while recent announcements mean the season’s milk price won’t be as high as expected, the company said in a statement. Because of that, Synlait said first-half and annual earnings will probably beat forecasts in 2014. It predicted profit of $19.6 million on sales of $524 million in its prospectus.

“We now expect the company will benefit from both earnings growth in our value added categories, a favourable product mix, and lower than expected milk prices,” chief executive John Penno said. “This is likely to mean Synlait’s earnings for the half and full FY14 will be ahead of forecast.” . . .

Showcasing the best – Rebecca Harper:

It’s show time here in Feilding.

Growing up, the Hawke’s Bay A&P Show was a huge part of our family life. We went to a small country school and they closed the school and gave us all the day off, because we all went to the show.

Dad used to enter lambs every year and there was usually a coloured certificate to take home for a prize on the hoof or the hook.

I rode my pony and competed in the horse events and my brothers and I were given money for the rides. . .

Kiwis take Aussie shield – Tim Fulton:

New Zealand has run away with Australia’s agricultural and pastoral show shield.

The FCAS Shield has been contested by Australian states since 2000, while NZ entered the fray five years ago.

FCAS is the Federated Council of Agricultural Societies, an equivalent of the Royal Agricultural Society in NZ.

First, second, and third placings in premier show competitions are combined to find the shield winner. . . .

Rural women up front and centre – Abby Brown:

Members of Rural Women’s Scott’s Ferry branch showed off their underwear at the Royal A&P show on December 6.

The Y fronts and boxers were decorated as part of their Y Front campaign which encouraged men to be up front about prostate cancer and get checked.

The underwear decorated one wall of the advocacy group’s booth.

Another wall was decorated with plaster cast breasts, as the group also encouraged women to get checked for breast cancer. . .


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