Rural round-up

May 25, 2018

Farmer has to start again after M. bovis – Sally Rae:

It is not surprising that Graham Hay gets a little choked up as he describes the devastating impact of Mycoplasma bovis on his farming business.

The Hakataramea Valley property has been in the family since his grandfather took over in 1921 and Mr Hay has lived there all his life.

He and his wife, Sonja, have invested in it for their children to carry on and he was one of the drivers of Haka Valley Irrigation Ltd, a small group of farmers who brought water to the traditionally dry valley.

But the cattle disease has ”destroyed” their business. . .

New Zealand could achieve world first by eradicating Mycoplasma – Gerard

No country has ever eradicated Mycoplasma bovis, but they have never really tried, Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor says.

The Government is widely expected to opt for an eradication approach to tackle the cattle disease which has shaken the rural sector since being detected last year.

Despite the lack of precedent for ridding any country of the disease before now, “members of the technical advisory group regard it as feasible,” O’Connor said. . .

M. bovis predicted to bring about the end of sharemilking in New Zealand – Andrea Vance:

Farmers are predicting the end of sharemilking as the country moves to control the outbreak of Mycoplasma bovis.

Share-milkers own their own cows – but not the land– so move them from farm to farm. Some use the income to save for their own farm.

But Primary Industries Minister Damien O’Connor said farming practices must change, with less movement of stock, as officials battle the infection. . . 

Survey assess health of NZ’s farming women – Yvonne O’Hara:

Farmstrong is asking farming women to complete a survey about their health and social connections to identify key wellbeing issues and provide information for research into possible tools and solutions to issues.

Farmstrong is a non-commercial initiative founded by rural insurer FMG and the Mental Health Foundation and provides programmes, advice and events that focus on farmers’ health and wellbeing.

Project manager Gerard Vaughan said the survey had had more than 820 responses so far and would close in early June. . .

Moteo apple orchards show way of the future – Rose Harding:

A new block of apples at Moteo is the way of the future, according to its developers.

The 47ha leased block being developed by T and G is planted to be two-dimensional rather than the usual three.

This is done by training growth along wires so the fruit is easily visible and easily picked. It also simplifies thinning and pruning.

T and G national growing manager Lachlan McKay says the Moteo block is the biggest 2D planting in New Zealand. He was reluctant to give an exact cost for the development. It was clearly not cheap. . . .

Kiwifruit monthly exports soar to new high:

Kiwifruit exports rose $197 million (82 percent) in April 2018 compared with April 2017, to reach $438 million, Stats NZ said. This is a new high for any month.

The rise in kiwifruit exports was the leading contributor to a $345 million rise (7.3 percent) in overall goods exports, which reached $5.1 billion. This is the second-highest for any month – the highest level was $5.5 billion in December 2017.

“Kiwifruit exports were up for all New Zealand’s principal kiwifruit markets – China, the European Union, and Japan,” international statistics manager Tehseen Islam said. . .

Agricultural innovation in East Otago: helping to shape New Zealand’s farming industry – D.A. Stevens & K.A. Cousins:

ABSTRACT

The East Otago region has been at the forefront of agricultural advancement in New Zealand with key people leading the way in creating a culture of innovation. Rural technology developments are traced back from the emerging new biotechnology industries, through animal genetics research, improvements in hill country and pasture production, soil and fertiliser research, the introduction of deer farming and sheep breeding, to the frozen meat shipments, agricultural organisation restructuring and land reforms of the early settlers. . .


Rural round-up

August 21, 2017

Labour needs to provide detail on water charging policy:

New Labour Party leader Jacinda Ardern’s plan to charge water royalties for commercial bottlers and irrigation schemes is a pre-election crowd pleaser.

It capitalises on the outrage some people feel when they read of pure New Zealand water being shipped off in bottles overseas for the profit of foreigners. The idea that revenues raised can be redirected into cleaning up our stressed and polluted waterways also speaks to valid environmental concerns.

But the policy has come out of nowhere, and the lack of detail is worrisome. Voters could be excused for thinking it is a glib, once-over-lightly headline-grabber.

If they find themselves on the Treasury benches after next month’s election, Labour might learn the lesson with water that US President Donald Trump learned with healthcare – who knew that it could be so complicated? . . 

Te Mana brings the fat back into lamb to appease even the harshest critics – Pat Deavoll:

Chef and co-owner of the Wanaka Gourmet Kitchen, Dale Bowie reckons he can get even the most ardent critic to enjoy a lamb rack thanks to a product called Te Mana Lamb.

“We’ve had customers here say they don’t like lamb, but when others on their table start saying how great it is, they try some and think it’s brilliant,” Bowie says.

A generation of Kiwis has grown up with the mantra that fat is bad, yet Bowie’s table guests are told that Te Mana Lamb has a high level of Omega-3 fatty acids and polyunsaturated fats that are good for you. . .

Poo-powered electricity, hot water – Pam Tipa:

A biogas recovery system using methane from dairy effluent to generate electricity and heat water was one of three finalists in the Energy Technology of the Year award in the 2017 Deloitte Energy Excellence Awards.

The system was installed by John Scandrett of Dairy Green Ltd with Fortuna Group Ltd.

The ground-breaking project implementing a prototype methane recovery system on a 950-cow farm in Southland has demonstrated for the first time commercial viability of this technology within a cool climate, says Dairy Green in its award entry. . .

Getting off the well-worn farm track – Jamie Gray:

New Zealand’s farming model will have to change as lab-grown meat gobbles up the low-cost market, and Landcorp can lead the way, says chief executive Steven Carden.

Carden, who heads up the country’s biggest farming company, says the old model – producing bulk commodities at low prices – has served the country well for the last century or so.

Until now.

“We see headwinds coming around the traditional protein farming model, [that’s] meat and milk,” he says. . .

Selling our meat is a game of two halves – Craig Wiggins:

Over the past few months I’ve emceed a fair share of rural awards and conferences where mention of synthetic proteins and insect flour scared many a middle-aged farmer.

The talk that’s being shouted from on high about being prepared for these new products to take over the world of food production as we know it was more than enough to cause many a listener to question their future as sustainable farmers of the future.

A synthetic steak, a petri dish hamburger and cricket flour chocolate mudcake all sound like a taste test from hell. However, we’re being led to believe these products won’t only be palatable but taste more like the real thing than the real thing. . .

FMG board revamp:

Three agribusiness leaders have been elected to the board of rural insurer FMG.

Geoff Copstick, Murray Taggart and Steve Allen were elected by FMG members at its annual meeting in Hanmer Springs this week.

Copstick was chief financial officer of Gallagher Group in Hamilton for nine years. He is now on Gallagher’s board and chair of its audit and risk committee. Copstick also serves as an independent advisor to Northland Regional Council on finance, audit and economic development issues. . .

Scarred country creates pest nest – Tim Futon:

Earthquake damage has helped gorse, broom and pest animals fan out across Kaikoura.

Kaikoura’s pest liaison committee chairman Derrick Millton said the region faced an explosion of deer, goats and possums.

Parts of the Clarence back-country were full of Red deer and there was serious risk of more erosion and fouling of waterways if they weren’t kept in check, he said. . .

Two NZ wineries sold to fine wine start-up – Lauren Eads:

Two prominent New Zealand wineries have been acquired by a newly-established fine wine company co-founded by the man who launched Craggy Range and a US-based wildlife conservationist.

Pyramid Valley Vineyards in Waikari, North Canterbury, and Lowburn Ferry Wines, Central Otago, have both become the first purchases of Aotearoa New Zealand Fine Wine Estates Limited Partnership (ANZFWE) – a new venture between Brian Sheth, sole director of US-based Sangreal Wines LLC, and Steve Smith MW, sole director of LandbaseWineNZ Ltd. . .


Rural round-up

November 6, 2015

Lochinver Station sells to New Zealand buyer:

One of New Zealand’s largest farms, Lochinver Station in the central North Island, will remain in New Zealand ownership following its sale for an undisclosed sum to privately owned New Zealand farming group Rimanui Farms Ltd.

It will take over the ownership of the 13,843 hectare sheep and beef station, upon settlement of the sale in March next year, from one of New Zealand’s largest private companies, Stevenson Group Limited, which has owned it for more than half a century.

Bayleys Real Estate recommenced marketing the property last month after the Government announced it had turned down an Overseas Investment Office application from Chinese company Shanghai Pengxin’s subsidiary Pure 100 to buy the property. . . 

IrrigationNZ calls for 350,000ha more land to be irrigated – Sophie Boot:

(BusinessDesk) – IrrigationNZ is calling for a dramatic escalation in irrigation, saying New Zealand could bring water to an additional 350,000 hectares by 2025, boosting agricultural production and providing a buffer against weather events such as El Nino-induced drought.

The lobby group wants a 50 percent increase in irrigated land in the next 10 years, according to its industry snapshot released today. New Zealand currently has about 720,000 hectares of irrigated land, and IrrigationNZ has produced a map showing where irrigation could be expanded, pushing total watered land to more than 1 million hectares.

Chief executive Andrew Curtis said New Zealand’s primary production growth is being hampered by a lack of a reliable water supply, which ultimately holds back economic growth. . . 

No jobs?  move to the regions, urges govt:

Unemployed people are being urged to look to the regions for work by the government, after the unemployment rate broke the 6 percent mark yesterday.

The rate is now at its highest point in two years and economists have predicted that it is likely to rise further.

Listen to more on Morning Report ( 4 min 32 sec )

But Steven Joyce, Minister of Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment told Morning Report it was a “multi-regional story”, with lot of shifts around the country.

He said that in some regions such as Otago and Northland, there were shortages of people applying for jobs, and unemployed people should consider moving if they could. . . 

Forestry joins GIA biosecurity agreement:

The forestry industry has become the sixth industry group to join the Government Industry Agreement (GIA) biosecurity partnership, Primary Industries Ministers Nathan Guy and Jo Goodhew have announced today.

“It’s great to have the New Zealand Forest Owners Association (FOA) onboard, working with the Ministry for Primary Industries to manage and respond to the most important biosecurity risks,” says Mr Guy.

“A growing number of industries have now signed up to work together with the Government through the GIA.” . . 

Forest defence bolstered by agreement with government:

The Forest Owners Association says having a biosecurity agreement with the government is a vital part of the forest industry’s defence system.

FOA chief executive David Rhodes and primary industries minister Nathan Guy today signed what is known as a Government-Industry Agreement at Parliament. The agreement defines where responsibilities and costs will fall in the event of an outbreak of a serious forest pest or disease.

“For 50 years we have had a forest health surveillance scheme that is seen by overseas experts as one of the best in the world. But being ‘best’ is not good enough, we need it to be as near to perfect as we can make it,” says Mr Rhodes. . . 

FMG's photo.


Rural round-up

August 18, 2015

Dairying must take a long-term view – Chris Lewis:

There’s no doubt in anyone’s mind that Fonterra’s announcement last Friday was a blow.

The politics that followed was not surprising either, but disappointing nonetheless.

But underneath all that noise, what this means for our economy and what the government should be doing, are the dairy farmers directly affected.  Most importantly, we need to be talking about what this means for them and how we can support them.

While some dairy farm businesses will exit the industry following consecutive low pay-outs, the vast majority will be able to farm through the next few seasons with the support of their banks, but farmers need to engage. . .

NZ Pastures to sell off half its shares:

South Island farming operation New Zealand Pastures Ltd, which owns seven farms in Otago and Canterbury, has announced it is putting up half of its shares for sale.

New Zealand Pastures’ largest shareholder is a Netherlands-based pension fund, which will keep its 50 percent stake. The other shares are held by a small group of professional and institutional investors. . .

Rural insurer announces $26.7m profit:

The country’s largest rural insurer, Farmers Mutual Group, has announced an after tax profit of $26.7 million, its sixth consecutive profit.

Farmers Mutual Group (FMG) chief executive Chris Black said the result was underpinned by investment income of about $23 million.

“Eighty percent of our investments are cash and bonds, so very secure and relatively stable. We take a conservative view, and the other 20 percent is in equity investments. We use that profit in a range of ways, firstly adding to reserves.” . . .

Premium US beef supplier likes SFF – Sally Rae:

Lenny Lebovich has travelled the world to see where the best grass fed beef was to be found.

The founder and chief executive of Chicago based company Pre Beef ended up in New Zealand, where he talked to some key companies and felt his company had the most in common with Silver Fern Farms.

Mr Lebovich, who started his career as an investment banker and has traded that for a role in the meat industry, was looking for high quality beef. . .

Little bit of everything at Gore A&P’s fundraising ball – Sally Rae:

Whether you’re in the market for a Hereford or hay, fodder beet or firewood, the Gore A&P Association’s Spring Ball is the place to be.

The ball is being held in the James Cumming Wing on August 22 to raise money for 16 new horse boxes at the showgrounds. It was hoped about 200 people would attend.

The A&P committee needed to raise about $50,000 for the development, committee member Tryphena Carter said. . .

Kate Taylor's photo.


Rural round-up

July 15, 2015

FMG gets $3m flood, snow claims – so far:

The country’s largest rural insurer Farmers Mutual Group says it has received $3 million worth of claims related to the flooding and snow that hit the country last month.

FMG said the severe flooding in the lower North Island prompted 264 claims from the Manawatu-Whanganui and Taranaki regions, and snow damage in Canterbury led to 80 claims being lodged.

General manager of advice and insurance Conrad Wilkshire said most of the claims were for damage to houses, contents, sheds, and farm equipment.

In one case, a farm building was swept down a river. . .

Fonterra’s rivals tell DIRA review there is insufficient competition for dairy industry deregulation – Fiona Rotherham:

(BusinessDesk) – Competitors of Fonterra Cooperative Group, the country’s largest dairy processor, claim there’s still insufficient competition to deregulate the industry.

In submissions to the Commerce Commission, which is undertaking a government-ordered review of the industry’s competitiveness, rival processors either want the status quo or the regulations tightened.

Farmers lobby group, Federated Farmers, says the Dairy Industry Restructuring Act 2001(DIRA) will need to be amended if it’s retained long-term. . .

 Kiwi Developed Sugar Substitute to Tackle Obesity Problem:

A new low-calorie sugar alternative made entirely from fruit and developed by Kiwis, is set to offer companies around the world a natural way to reduce sugar in everyday foods and beverages such as cereals, yoghurts and juices, without compromising flavour.

Developed by Kiwi and Chinese joint venture company Guilin GFS Monk Fruit Corporation, Sweet-Delicious is a natural fruit juice made from a small Chinese melon called monk fruit. As a natural low-calorie alternative to sugar and artificial sweeteners it is a new way to tackle the growing obesity epidemic. . .

 ‘Drought man’ coming to Lincoln:

“Innovate or stagnate” will be the main message from Grassmere farmer Doug Avery when he visits Lincoln University next Thursday.

Avery’s talk about turning drought and desperation into sustainability and success will take place on Thursday, July 16 at 7pm.

Avery, also known as the ‘drought man’, says he understands the value of farmers learning from farmers. . .

Fonterra strengthens ties with the Netherlands:

Associate Minister of Trade Todd McClay says a new Fonterra ingredients factory in the Netherlands, opened yesterday by Dutch King Willem-Alexander, marks an exciting step forward in agribusiness collaboration between New Zealand and the Netherlands.

The state-of-the-art factory in Heerenveen, Friesland, has been developed in partnership with Dutch conglomerate A-Ware Food Group, which has built a major new cheese plant next door.

Whey and lactose, by-products of A-Ware’s cheese-making process, will be processed into specialty ingredients by the Fonterra plant. These will be used in high-value paediatric, maternal, and sports nutrition products for sale in the European Union and beyond. . .

Kiwifruit Claim Wins First Round:

The High Court at Wellington has ruled in favour of The Kiwifruit Claim and against the Crown on all substantial points, in a judgment released on 8 July.

Kiwifruit growers and post-harvest operators who were negatively affected by Psa have untilFriday 9 October 2015 to sign up to The Kiwifruit Claim, the court has ruled.

The court said growers and post-harvest operators should be allowed to bring the proceedings as a representative or class action, which had been opposed by the Crown Law Office (CLO). . .

Hemp seed food sales remain on horizon:

The adoption of a hemp seed food standard remains on the horizon, following work requested by the Food Standards Australia New Zealand Ministerial Forum earlier this year says Food Safety Minister Jo Goodhew.

“New Zealand supports a standard allowing the sale of hemp seed food products, and I am hopeful that the Ministerial Forum will be able to assess the proposed hemp standard again early next year,” says Mrs Goodhew.

“The best available science shows us that hemp seed is safe to eat and has positive nutritional properties. However, the Ministerial Forum had some unanswered questions when it met in January. . .

 

Review of Hemp as a Food:

The NZ Grain and Seed Trade Association (NZGSTA) was pleased to learn today that the Australia and New Zealand Ministerial Forum on Food Regulation (the Forum) was continuing to address some concerns around the sale of hemp seed foods for human consumption.

Responding to the Forum’s communiqué issued from Hobart Thomas Chin, association general manager, said the industry realises that the NZ Minister and officials were supportive of hemp seed foods and they are continuing with strong efforts to help see the development of a new cropping opportunity for NZ primary producers and manufacturers. . .

 

Wool Market Slightly Easier:

New Zealand Wool Services International Limited’s General Manager, Mr John Dawson reports that the first wool auction of the 2015/16 season offering 6,800 bales comprising predominantly 80 percent short second shear wools, saw a 92 percent clearance with a slightly softer tone.

Despite a weaker New Zealand dollar compared to the last sale on 25th June, with the weighted currency indicator down 1.96 percent, the bulk of the offering was firm to 2 percent easier.

Mr Dawson advises that the seasonal slow-down in order, approaching European vacation period and well stocked supply lines in China are limiting new orders for wool temporarily. . .

 


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