Rural round-up

June 2, 2014

Dairy growth transforms High Country –  Graeme Acton:

The dry grasslands of the South Island’s Mackenzie Country are a truly iconic New Zealand location. But Insight investigates how much pressure the landscape might face from plans to increase dairying.

The Mackenzie Country is a tough and unforgiving land where farming is difficult, and where generations of New Zealand farming families have struggled with snow and ice, drought and pests.

But the Mackenzie Country is undergoing a transformation, a quiet revolution where the tussock is giving way to ryegrass, and where the sheep are slowly being replaced by dairy cows.

Irrigation in the Mackenzie raises two vital issues: the protection of water quality and the protection of the current landscape. . .

 Fashion stores get the wool message – Patrick O’Sullivan:

Shepherds mixed with shopkeepers and fashion designers stroked city sheep at the launch of Wool Week on Monday.

The “We’re Loving Wool!” message is being spread throughout the nation’s cities this week, thanks to Primary Wool Co-operative sponsorship.

The launch was at Auckland’s Britomart, where the country’s top designers were in attendance.

Zambesi’s Liz Findlay, Campaign for Wool New Zealand Fashion ambassador, shared the impact of wool on her clothing collections. . .

 Gypsy Day marks homecoming for Waikato farmer –  Erin Majurey:

Watch out on rural Waikato roads this weekend.

It’s likely to be busy as farmers pack up their troubles and head to pastures new for the start of the next dairy season.

It culminates tomorrow with what has become known as Gypsy Day – the day when contracts are up and farms change hands.

Many have spent this week packing boxes and cleaning their ovens preparing for moving day, when they will march their stock down the road only to pick up where they left off.

Among them is Ruakura herd manager Joel Baldwin who is heading home to Putaruru.

Baldwin, 24, will start sharemilking on his father Gray’s farm. . .

 Gypsy Day challenges some schools:

A rural principal says while Gypsy Day means a lot of work for farmers, it’s also a difficult time for country schools.

The first day of June marks the start of the new dairy season, and sharemilkers around New Zealand are shifting farms to start new contracts.

The principal of Lauriston School in mid-Canterbury, Dianne Pendergast, says the uncertainty of where pupils and their families will be can be stressful for teachers trying to plan class sizes. . . .

 

Still keen to see who’s top dog – Sahban Kanwal:

Peter Boys has been dog trialling for 50 years and he is still going strong.

Boys, from Timaru, has been competing for as long as he can remember and he does not have any plans to quit soon.

“I am going to compete for as long as I can – I still have about 10 years left in me,” he said, as he finished his turn in this year’s New Zealand and South Island Sheep Dog Trials Championships, at Waihi Station near Geraldine.

Boys’ dog, 4-year-old Jem, is not quite as old a hand at the championships as her owner, and according to Boys, she has maybe another six years of participating in these events. . . .

http://worldtruth.tv/


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