Rural round-up

September 18, 2015

Why the government has finally stopped a Chinese farm purchase – Politik:

The offer by a Chinese company to buy Lochinver station was turned down by the Government largely because the potential buyer was not proposing to invest much more money on the station.

Government sources have told POLITIK that the buyer, Shanghai Pengxin subsidiary, Pure 100 Farm, was proposing to spend only another $3 million extra on the station.

“What’s that – two and half Auckland houses?” said the source. . . 

Lochinver decision was a slow process:

The Overseas Investment Office could be in for an overhaul after concerns about the time taken to make a decision over Lochinver Station.

Shanghai Pengxin had agreed to buy the country’s biggest dairy farm for $88 million but ministers said there weren’t enough benefits for the country.

It took 14 months before the deal was finally blocked, and the owners are angry at the delays.

The Prime Minister admits it is a slow process which needs to change. . .

Federated Farmers welcomes government decision on Lochinver sale:

While Federated Farmers supports positive overseas investment into New Zealand’s farming system, it has welcomed today’s announcement by the Government that it has declined the sale of Lochinver Station to Shanghai Pengxin Group Co. Limited.

“New Zealand absolutely needs foreign investment, but there has to be clearly demonstrated benefit to the local and national economy. This was not proven here and we believe the Lochinver decision reinforces the importance of changes made to the Overseas Investment Office rules over recent years,” says Dr William Rolleston, President of Federated Farmers. . . 

Putting a dollar value on using good beef genetics:

Beef + Lamb New Zealand (B+LNZ) Genetics is launching a new progeny test to put a dollar value on the extra profit that can be added to the dairy-beef supply chain by using good beef genetics.

At its core, the four-year test will calculate the additional value that can be added by using high-genetic-merit beef bulls, versus the unrecorded bulls traditionally used as “follow-on bulls” in most New Zealand dairy systems. What are the financial advantages for the dairy farmer, calf rearer and beef finisher?

Limestone Downs near Port Waikato is a high-profile trust-owned property, covering 3,200ha and wintering about 27,000 stock units. It has a long-standing relationship with Massey University and is often used to trial research projects in a commercial setting. The operation converted 350ha to a dairy milking platform two years ago and runs 610 Friesian cows and 190 heifers.

Ewe won’t believe the number of lambs –  Cameron Massey:

A first time mum in Thames doesn’t do it by halves – giving birth to quintuplet lambs.

Thames resident and ex-sheep farmer Weston Finlay keeps sheep on his property to keep the lawns in check and when he was offered a second ewe to accompany his first he couldn’t see any problem.

Only the new sheep was not a ewe at all. . .

Dos and Don’ts of bringing up a pet lamb: – Peter Fowler:

It’s that time of year again: schools around the country are holding pet days, and pet lambs proving a popular option. 

But bringing up a pet lamb can be fraught with difficulty. Rural News went to Elsthorpe Primary School in central Hawke’s Bay to find out from one of the winners of the pet lamb competition what it takes to bring up a champion lamb.

Phoebe, who has been a winner in the competition for four years in a row, said the first consideration was having enough space for the lamb.

Economic growth boosted by services and primary industries

Growth in services and primary industries supported a 0.4 percent increase in GDP in the June 2015 quarter, Statistics New Zealand said today.

Agricultural production increased 3 percent in the June 2015 quarter, due to increased meat and dairy farming.

“Despite falling milk prices, we’re seeing growth in dairy production,” national accounts manager Gary Dunnet said. “But over the year, agriculture is up only a little, due to dry conditions last summer.” . . 

Hunt for great dairy pastures is on again:

The hunt is on for great dairy pastures in the Waikato and Bay of Plenty.

Entries are now open for the Pasture Renewal Persistence Competition run by the DairyNZ-led Pasture Improvement Leadership Group.
Competition organiser and DairyNZ developer Sally Peel says pasture renewal is one of the first steps to achieving high performing pastures. Improving poor yielding paddocks through good renewal practices can achieve substantial increase in pasture tonnage.

The competition has been running for five years with winners from all across the two regions.
Robert Garshaw of Waiuku won the 2014 best first year pasture. “Decisions such as cultivar and endophyte choice do matter. It’s really important to figure out what works well out of your farm and make the most of the establishment period,” says Robert. . . 

 


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