Rural round-up

November 10, 2016

Significant Concerns Raised by Feds’ Healthy Rivers Project:

Discussions held with Waikato Federated Farmers members have revealed significant concerns about the impact of the Waikato Regional Council’s proposed ‘Plan Change One’.

Federated Farmers hosted a meeting for the release of the report on its Farm Plan Project, which aimed to test drive the Farm Environment Plan part the proposed ‘Healthy Rivers’ Plan.

The Farm Plan Project used 13 Waikato (mainly drystock) farms as case studies to implement the ‘Farm Environment Plans’ which will be required by the new council Plan.

Fonterra also ran a parallel process which are in the report to look at the effects on 11 Fonterra dairy farms. . . 

Fishing industry’s elder statesman had salt in his blood – Mike Watson:

OBITUARY: Commercial fishing’s elder statesman, Edward ‘Ted’ Laurence Collins, would be remembered as much for his generosity and support of the fishing industry as his broad physique honed from breaking underwater swimming records as a school boy in Marlborough.

Born in Blenheim, Collins lived all his life in Marlborough, settling in Spring Creek with his wife, Gwen, and daughters Jan and Sue, and son Peter.

He began work as a farmer but soon followed his passion to become a commercial fisherman and fishery advocate during a period of great change in the industry which included the introduction of the quota management system, and the establishment of the exclusive economic zone. . . 

Pastures most valuable crops – Richard Rennie:

Ryegrass and clover reign supreme on the charts as New Zealand’s most valuable crops.  

They came out on top in a Ministry for Primary Industries report that took stock of the country’s top 65 crops by value to the economy.  

The report compiled by the Institute for Economic Research was the first time an attempt had been made to quantify the entire range of grasses and horticultural and tree crops cultivated for commercial purposes.  The authors noted previous efforts had viewed the value of crops individually and had examined only the exported value of specific crops. . . 

A world full of cameras seems to target farmers – James Stewart:

 Life in the 21st century means we are all on show. 

Our world is now full of cameras.  From closed circuit television (CCTV) to smart phones, the new age means that instantly our actions can be streamed to the world to view. 

In seconds you can go from zero to hero.  Or for our local All Black legend Aaron Smith, all it takes is 10 minutes of lurking outside public toilets, and you are temporarily a national disgrace.

In my own backyard, the recent footage by Farmwatch has hit home how much of a target us farmers have become.  We are under scrutiny and to be honest, I’m going to have to hold back on a few four letter profanities about how this really makes me feel. . . 

A2 Milk reports first quarter revenue of $112.5 mln, shares rise 4%  –  Edwin Mitson:

(BusinessDesk) – A2 Milk, which markets milk based on the supposed health benefits of the A2 milk protein, says first quarter sales met expectations with sales driven by growth in infant formula and milk. The shares rose 4 percent on the update.

The Auckland-based, Sydney-headquartered company reported revenue of $112.5 million in the three months ended Sept. 30 in a presentation by chief executive Geoffrey Babidge to a UBS conference in Sydney. Sales of fresh milk in Australia and New Zealand were up 7 percent from a year earlier.

Babidge also said there had been “continued and consistent growth” in consumer demand for its A2 Platinum infant formula, despite research reports suggesting demand would be volatile. . . 

$75,000 Awarded to Conservation Innovators:

Using drone trackers for wildlife research, monitoring health of waterways and developing an app to help Kauri conservation – these are the winning ideas of WWF’s 2016 Conservation Innovation Awards, announced today.

The Kiwi innovators behind these ideas will each be awarded a $25,000 grant to recognise their contribution to innovation in conservation. The three winners will be congratulated at an event in Wellington tonight, MCed by journalist and public speaker, Rod Oram, and with Hon Steven Joyce, Minister of Science and Innovation, as the keynote speaker.

The winning ideas are:

DroneCounts
DroneCounts wants to take wildlife tracking to the next level, with a model that can pick up several signals and map wildlife in an area. . . 

Lazy Scumbags Prey on Young Couple – Rick Powdrell:

Once again stock theft is in the news. Some scumbags too lazy to rear their own calves wait for an enterprising couple to do the hard yards, then steal 55 of their animals.

This young Canterbury couple are working multiple jobs as well as rearing calves to get ahead in life. Rearing calves alone is a time-consuming job, with morning and evening feeding, individual animal attention required to ensure good animal health, plus the necessary cleaning to maintain a healthy environment.

This couple have clear goals on what their future holds and one just around the corner, their marriage, has now been pushed out into the future.

This theft highlights many of the factors being promoted around New Zealand at the combined FMG / NZ Police / Federated Farmers Rural Crime Prevention Workshops. . . 

Honey wars: crime and killings in New Zealand’s manuka honey industry –  Eleanor Ainge Roy:

It was the day the bees died – tens of thousands of them in 300 hives, mysteriously killed.

“The massacre”, as it is being called, happened in the otherwise idyllic landscape of Doubtless Bay in New Zealand’s far north.

And for David Yanke and Rachel Kearney, co-owners of Daykel Apiaries, the cause of death was obvious: malicious poisoning.

“It is a nightmare, I don’t feel safe any more,” says Kearney as she sits at her kitchen table on her family’s farm, 40km east of the Northland hub of Kaitaia. “I feel violated. It has almost turned into a PTSD [post-traumatic stress disorder] experience for me.” . . 

Scheme spurs massive re-think :

Four years ago, when David Kidd took over the management of 555ha of leased bare land overlooking the Kaipara Harbour, he knew he had work to do.

He and his employer, McEwan-Kidd partnership, began an intensive development programme which included subdivision, installing a water system and carrying out fertiliser and pasture renewal programmes.

They also set up a cattle-only stock policy on the flat to rolling land, running Angus breeding cows, beef bulls, trading heifers and steers – amounting to 5000-6000 stock units. . . 

Mid-season pulse check:

Owl Farm’s final Farm Focus Day of 2016 takes place on 16 November. “As usual we have a great calibre of speakers on hand to share progress to date, and to look towards the future,” says Farm Demonstration Manager Doug Dibley.

“Although it’s been a pretty wet and bleak start to the dairy season with the continuous rain we’ve received, there has been a silver lining seen through the slow recovery of the global markets. This renewed confidence has seen Fonterra twice increase their forecast farm gate milk price. We have Matt Bolger of Fonterra coming to share with us where they see things heading in the next 12 to 18 months and what we can expect as a result.” . . 


Rural round-up

July 17, 2011

Farming couple move south to live dream – Collette Devlin:

Hannes and Lyzanne Du Plessis travelled to New Zealand from South Africa eight years ago with their child, a suitcase and only $20 in a bank account.

Six weeks ago, they moved to Southland with their three children to contract milk on a dairy syndicate managed by MyFarm at Edendale.

“We had no idea our lives would go in this direction,” Mrs Du Plessis said. “We want our story to inspire others. You do not need a lot of money or experience, because the opportunities to live your dream are all here within the New Zealand dairy industry.” . . .

Self-shedding dorper sheep a growing breed – Collette Devlin:

The dorper sheep, a common sight in most parts of the country, was introduced to New Zealand by a Southland breeder, but it remains a rare breed in the region.

There are 45 registered breeders in New Zealand but only four of these are registered in Southland, the New Zealand Sheep Breeders Association reports. Two are in Gore, one in Balclutha and one in South Otago . . .

Problems facing new grain and seed head – Gerald Piddock:

Ian Mackenzie has taken up the chair of Federated Farmers Grain and Seed at a tumultuous time.

He comes into the role after a tough few years for grain farmers with a grain surplus keeping returns low for many of them . . .

June farm sales up year on year but median price per hectare at 7 year low says REINZ – Gareth Vaughan:

A total of 111 farms changed hands last month, 30 more than in June
last year, according to the Real Estate Institute of New Zealand
(REINZ), with nearly half the sales coming in Canterbury, Otago and
Southland. However, REINZ says the median price per hectare is now at
its lowest level since July 2004.

The June sales included 13 dairy farms and 59 grazing properties and
compares with the 81 farms that changed hands in June 2010, 80 in June
2009, 216 in June 2008, 212 in June 2007 and 158 in June 2006. . .

Radicalsim from the far right – Tony Chaston:

Don Nicolsons foray into politics from a Federated Farmers background
is not new, as many well known politicans have started their political
career via this way.

Just how successful he will be only time will tell, but it is
interesting to note that Bruce Wills the new president has already
stated that his style will be less divisive. Is the political following
by farmers changing, and are they moving further to the right and away
from ther traditional National Party roots? . .

Nestle takes slice of Vital Foods:

A subsidiary of global food giant Nestle says it is taking a minority stake in Vital Foods, a New Zealand company that specialises in developing kiwifruit-based “functional foods” solutions for gastrointestinal conditions.

Terms of the deal have not been disclosed, but Nestle Health Science said in a statement that it would take a seat on the board of Vital Foods “to help steer future product development as well as commercial strategy”. . .

It’s time for some friendly persuasion – Jon Morgan:

Bruce Wills has the creased features of an outdoorsman and the dirty fingernails of a farmer who just a few hours before was dagging lambs in the Hawke’s Bay hills. But seated in the Wellington head office of Federated Farmers he looks at home in a suit and tie.

He is a model of the modern farmer – university educated, highly numerate, literate, articulate and computerate, and an agricultural jack-of-all-trades, handy with hammer, fencing pliers, shearer’s handpiece, drenching gun and team of dogs.

Now he wants to add political lobbying to his skillset – the tramping of corridors, handshaking, backslapping, joshing, hard talk, soft persuasion and smiling through clenched teeth . . .

I’ve got farming in my blood –  Eleanor Ainge Roy:

Bruce Wills, the new head of Federated Farmers, talks about a childhood spent taming the wilderness, and the price he paid for returning to the family land.

When the Wills family moved onto Trellinoe Farm in the late 1950s, 45km north of Napier, the only accommodation was a tiny rabbiter’s cottage, stuck on the knob of a hill. There were no gardens, no fences, and no grass. Just acres and acres of blackberry scrub, wild pigs and goats.

After more than 50 years of hard yakka turning the land into an 1100ha sheep and cattle station, Bruce Wills says the family is still in the “breaking in” phase.

Wills, 50, is the new president of Federated Farmers, and spent his first week in the job travelling between Rotorua, Wellington, Trellinoe and Hamilton. It was a hectic mix of attending meetings, talking to the media – and sheep crutching on his farm.

Prime lambs return record sale prices – Sally Rae:

Record prices for prime lambs at southern stock sales are      giving farmers something to smile about after last year’s      shocking season when up to a million lambs died in freezing      conditions.   

A pen of about 20 Dorset Down ram lambs sold for $223.50 each      at a recent Charlton stock sale in Gore. The price was      believed to be a record for the saleyards, PGG Wrightson Gore      livestock manager Mark Cuttance said .  . .

Growth rates beefed up in simple herd home – Sally Rae:

When Mike Elliot could not get the growth rates he    desired through winter to finish beef cattle – despite feeding    as much as they wanted to eat – he looked for an alternative.   

With an 88ha farm in South Otago, although about 11ha of that  was in trees, it was a fairly small property and he needed to   farm intensively.

But he had a “phobia” about making mud and there were also      the increasing costs of planting crops and the amount of time      and effort to feed cattle on those crops . . .   

Support, direction required for rural sector – Dr Marion Johnson:

Sometimes I completely fail to understand New Zealand. As a     nation we trade on a clean green image yet encourage the  desecration of our resources at every turn.   

 We espouse a No 8 wire mentality; yet I wonder how many   citizens even know what No 8 wire is? We no longer support  innovation, unless it is within a prescribed field and then I      would debate the legitimacy of calling such developments innovation . . .   

Bee roads and wildflowers can help save bees in the UK – pasture farmers  are key players  – Pasture to Profit:

Do you know what a “Bee Road” is?
It’s a wild flower planting on farms to attract & protect Bees. I’ve started my own “Bee Road” sowing a wild flower strip of about 40metres x 10m along a roadside on a pasture based dairy farm.  https://www.cotswoldseeds.com/seedmix/wild-flowers-1 

It was sown this spring & is now in glorious techno colour. The bees &
insects love it but there have been some problems like the dry weather &
weed infestation. I am justly proud of my efforts but there are frustrations .  . .

Farmsafe and AgITO launch Quad Bike Farm Licence:

Farmsafe, in association with Agriculture ITO (AgITO), has launched the Quad Bike Farm
Licence.

“On average 35 farmers come off their quad bikes every day,” Grant Hadfield, FarmSafe national manager, says.

“FarmSafe and AgITO are committed to reducing accidents and changing attitudes through training on safe quad bike riding practices.”

The Quad Bike Farm Licence is gained through a practical on job training package that covers safe quad bike riding practices as well as teaching participants to effectively identify, minimise and isolate potential bike riding hazards and make safe riding decisions. . .


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