Rural round-up

July 14, 2015

NZInc, Australia Mall and China’s JD.com – Keith Woodford:

For the last four years I have been promoting the notion that we need an integrated approach to selling New Zealand food online in China. Now the Aussies have gone and beaten us with ‘Australia Mall’ on China’s JD.com.

Chinese buyers increasingly want to want to buy their food online. They want food that is processed in a Western country. They also want a one-stop online shop. And they want same day delivery.

All of the above consumer needs are increasingly being achieved by our competitors. We need to be there too. . .

$7.3m for agricultural research partnership:

The Government will invest $7.3 million over five years in an agricultural research partnership to improve pasture grasses and lift the performance of livestock farming, Science and Innovation Minister Steven Joyce and Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy announced today.

Pastoral Genomics is an industry-led research partnership between DairyNZ, Beef+Lamb NZ, Grasslands Innovation, NZ Agriseeds, DEEResearch, AgResearch, and Dairy Australia whose objective is to provide pastoral farmers with better forage cultivars that will increase productivity, profitability and environmental sustainability of New Zealand’s pastoral farming systems. . .

Risk-based approach mooted for bovine TB eradication  – Gerald Piddock:

Proposed changes for bovine tuberculosis management in New Zealand could see a risk-based approach adopted in deciding which livestock to test for the disease.

This meant shifting to a system where high TB risk areas would be targeted, a risk profile would be built around infected livestock. That profile would relate to the area, a herd’s history and the amount of stock movements. The higher the level of movements, the more risk there was of infection.

The Biosecurity Act required the plan to eradicate TB be formally reviewed on a regular basis. The proposed changes would come into effect in July 2016. . .

Designers carry the flag for wool:

The inspiring way in which Australia promotes wool used in its fashion and interiors sectors prompted Auckland fashion editor and stylist Anna Caselberg to initiate a fashion wool week this year – ‘Choose Wool 2015’.

The inaugural ‘We’re loving Wool’ week last year involved a number of New Zealand high fashion designers, with a major kick-off event – including sheep shearing – in the trendy Britomart precinct of Auckland. It was organised in conjunction with Elders Primary Wool. . .

Productivity and lifestyle meet at Bellingen – Nick Heydon:

AFTER time spent living in Hong Kong, Duncan and Fiona McDonald and their family planned to live at their North Coast grazing property “Glynravon”.

Mr McDonald purchased the property at Bellingen in 2008.

“Glynravon” was seen as an opportunity to set up a home base close to New England Girls School and The Armidale School, where Duncan and Fiona’s children were set to board.

“We decided on Bellingen so we could be close to the kids, close to the coast, and that it was easy to get to Sydney,” Mr McDonald said. . .

 Meat Slicer Nelson –Safer, More Efficient Meat Slicers on the Rise:

When dealing with fleshy goods, meat companies take utmost care in every part of the process. From raising the animals to their actual processing, butchers ensure complete sanitation in each step. All of them rely on heavy machinery to do much of all the heavy work, including slicing and packaging.

These two procedures have received much development in the recent years. Its involvement ensures clean meat reaches customers. As for the slicers, it’s just not about safety. People demand specific cuts for particular dishes. This means in addition to guaranteeing cleanliness, meat slicers have to be versatile and efficient.

Local Excellence

New Zealand can compete with the best meat and dairy producers in the world. With some of the most well looked after livestock, the Pacific nation exports top-class products guaranteed. Meat-loving countries demand constant supply of premium-grade meat from NZ’s prized farms and they cannot afford to disappoint. . .

 


Rural round-up

June 16, 2015

Federated Farmers water team ‘Reclaiming choice’:

Federated Farmers has launched its very own ‘Water Team’ in response to the growing challenges farmers face in securing a profitable and sustainable future. The Federation hopes to empower the provinces to negotiate their need for the natural resource which is threatened by the lack of choices and missed opportunities through ‘false dichotomies’.

Dr William Rolleston, Federated Farmers President, says “When we deny ourselves choices of how much risk we want to take we are limiting ourselves and our ability to move forward. Our challenge is to ensure regulators, politicians and the judiciary make decisions which are in line with the science, which reflect the uncertainty of the time but are not paralysed by it.

“That’s why Federated Farmers has been developing its very own specialist water team as well as science and innovation teams to help develop our policies and inform public debate.” . . .

 

Agribusiness Agenda poses challenges – Allan Barber:

KPMG’s Agribusiness Agenda for 2015 is a comprehensive analysis of the challenges faced by New Zealand agriculture in meeting the government’s target of doubling exports by 2025. In the light of dramatically falling dairy prices with little sign of recovery, what was always a big ask has suddenly become a whole lot harder.

The Agenda was prepared following a series of Roundtable discussions with a number of leading agricultural personalities from which the views of the participants have been distilled into a number of conclusions. The key finding is that there is a compelling need to add value to our agricultural output which the report admits is pretty obvious and easier to say than do. . .

Bay sheep make the news in New York – Patrick O’Sullivan:

A photo of a Hawke’s Bay flock of sheep has featured in New York Times Magazine.

It was taken by photographer and book publisher Grant Sheehan for a soon-to-be-released book on a sheep station west of Hastings, Kereru Station – Two Sisters’ Legacy.

The New York Times Magazine story was on Dronestagram, a website featuring aerial drone photography, where Mr Sheehan’s photo was featured.

Mr Sheehan, who grew up on a farm near Nelson, said sheep were very difficult to photograph. . .

Spring Sheep Dairy Takes First Step:

Spring Sheep Dairy has taken its first step, with joint venture owners Landcorp Farming Limited and SLC Group agreeing on the focus for its consumer-led marketing business.

Spring Sheep Dairy Chief Executive and Director Scottie Chapman says SSD’s long term goal is to export high value high quality sheep milk products to Asian consumers.

“We’re still to milk our first sheep so obviously there’s a long way to go and we will take a very careful and considered approach, but we are very excited about the potential opportunities this joint venture offers,” Mr Chapman says. . .

 

Auckland Signs Up For Farm Environment Competition:

Farmers in the Auckland region can now enter the prestigious Ballance Farm Environment Awards.

Awards-facilitator, the New Zealand Farm Environment (NZFE) Trust, has formed a partnership with Auckland Council to bring the highly successful competition to Auckland. The agreement means Auckland farmers and horticulturists are eligible to enter the 2016 Awards.

NZFE chair Simon Saunders says the trust is delighted to deliver the Ballance Farm Environment Awards to the region. . .

Partnership puts spotlight on dairy feed efficiency:

Feed supplier GrainCorp Feeds has teamed up with independent research and technical specialists Dairy Club to help New Zealand dairy farmers using supplementary feed to achieve maximum profit this season.

Farmers working with GrainCorp Feeds will have access to Dairy Club’s online milk prediction tool, Tracker™, which measures current milk production and shows how they can achieve maximum gain.

Dairy Club research shows that about $200,000 of efficiency and productivity gains for the average farm can be achieved using Tracker™, which is the equivalent to adding over $1.50 to the milk price. . .

 

Elders Primary Wool announce name change to CP Wool:

Elders Primary Wool has today announced they will change their brand name to CP Wool from September 2015. The brand name change follows the 50 per cent acquisition of the Elders New Zealand business by South Island based Carr Group.

The business will be identified as CP Wool in the market and will be underpinned by Carrfields Primary Wool, a play on the Carr Group transition to Carrfields which will roll out from July 2015. Primary Wool Cooperative, the other 50 per cent shareholder in the Elders Primary Wool business is represented by the Primary Wool reference. . .


Rural round-up

November 23, 2014

Meat Trade unrecognisable from 40 years ago – Allan Barber:

It is sometimes tempting to think nothing much has changed with meat exports in recent years when you read all the publicity about the problems in the meat industry. Since the beginning of this century the contrast with the dairy industry has been particularly marked, but suddenly this season the positions have been reversed. Sheep and beef farmers can hold their heads high again and it seems likely this state of affairs may even persist for longer than just this season.

MIE has been waging its campaign for meat industry reform based on the premise the industry is inefficient at procurement, processing and marketing with farmer ownership of the value chain the only solution. There is a degree of truth in the theory of inefficiency in all parts of the chain, but no certainty farmer ownership would cure it.

However that is a topic for another day. The industry’s efficiency has improved by several hundred percent since the Meat Board got out of product acquisition at the end of the 1970s and the processing part of the industry was delicensed in 1981. During the first half of the 1970s the Meat Board controlled all plant licenses and published the lamb and beef schedules. . .

Keen to engage with staff, farmers – Sally Rae:

When Keith Cooper’s surprise resignation as chief executive of Silver Fern Farms was announced last month, his successor’s name was unfamiliar to many. Agribusiness reporter Sally Rae meets Dean Hamilton, the man taking the helm of the billion-dollar business.

Dean Hamilton finds a challenge very appealing.

Having always been very driven and competitive, he acknowledged he enjoyed winning and taking the reins at Silver Fern Farms was an opportunity to ”have a big challenge and to win with that”.

Mr Hamilton joined the company as chief strategy officer in April, following more than 20 years in corporate finance and investment in both New Zealand and Australia. . .

Global commute for Kiwi meat workers – Mathew Dearnaley and Vaimoana Tapaleao:

Commuters stuck in motorway traffic might spare a thought for Anthony Russell’s crew of slaughtermen travelling more than 17,000km to work in Iceland each year.

The nine-member team, mainly from Hawkes Bay, are among about 30 New Zealanders whose skills are highly sought-after at six Icelandic freezing works for a brief sheep and lamb processing season before the long northern winter sets in.

Mr Russell has travelled for eight years from Waipukurau to Iceland’s northwestern coastal town of Blonduos (population – 811), where he runs SAH Products’ single processing chain after hand-picking his workmates for each two-month season. . .

Farmers alerted after tick-carried disease hits West Coast farm:

DairyNZ is alerting all farmers, including graziers, to keep an eye out for signs of a tick-carried disease that causes anaemia in cattle and to actively manage the risks of ticks to their herds.

Theileriosis is a disease caused by a species of Theileria, a blood-borne parasite that only affects cattle and is primarily transmitted by ticks. A new strain of Theileria orientalis called ikeda was first identified in Northland in late 2012. This strain has been associated with anaemia and death in cattle.

The DairyNZ warning comes after the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) confirmed that a case of Theileria had hit a South Island West Coast farm this Spring. MPI has concluded that a local population of infected ticks in Canterbury or the West Coast was responsible for transmitting infection to the 188-cow dairy herd. . .

Speech: DairyNZ Board Dinner – Jo Goodhew:

John [Hon John Luxton, Chair Dairy NZ], Tim [Tim Mackle Chief Executive] and members of the Dairy NZ Board for organizing this event.

I would like to acknowledge my Parliamentary colleagues: Hon Damien O’Connor, Ian McKelvie, Barbara Kuriger, and Fletcher Tabuteau.

There are also a large number of CE’s and leaders from business, government and local government here, including Kingi Smiler, Chairman of Miraka and Laurie Margrain, Chairman for Open Country Dairy, and Martyn Dunne, Director General of the Ministry for Primary Industries.

You asked me to speak on key priorities for me in my role as Food Safety Minister and for the Ministry for Primary Industry.

I will therefore concentrate on environment, water, skills and capability, as well as some comments on Food Safety.

This is a valuable time for discussion. There is an appropriate balance between environmental and social goals, and economic growth. Both of these can be achieved, and it requires collaboration between industry and government.

It is 200 years since the first dairy cows were brought to NZ. Over that time dairying has become deeply embedded in the Kiwi culture.

Our dairy products are now exported to over 140 different countries; it’s the major industry that keeps our economy afloat- contributing over $17 billion this year. . .

 

Keinzley Agvet Wairarapa Sheep and Beef Farm Business of the Year Competition:

The annual Keinzley Agvet Wairarapa Sheep and Beef Farm Business of the Year competition is calling for final entries before it closes on Friday 28 November 2014.

The aim of the competition is to promote innovative sheep and beef farming practice by identifying farmers in the area that demonstrate a well-balanced and positive approach to their business. These attributes will be promoted at a public field day which will be held on the winner’s property in early 2015. During the day the winner shares their management policies and farming objectives and answers questions from other farmers. These field days usually attract around 150 farmers and are a valuable opportunity to network and share ideas and knowledge.

The competition is open to any farmer, (lessee or owner), or farm manager in the region, whose farm income is derived mainly from sheep and cattle. Previous entrants of this competition are eligible and encouraged to re-enter. The prize package is approximately in $30,000 in cash and products. . .

NZ Yarn finalises acquisition Christchurch Yarns

NZ Yarn has today announced the acquisition of Christchurch Yarns has been finalised. The business will trade as NZ Yarn Limited effective immediately.

Elders Primary Wool (EPW) has secured a majority shareholding of approximately 58 per cent in the acquiring business NZ Yarn. The remaining 42 per cent shareholding is held by independent investors and growers. . .

 


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