Rural round-up

11/02/2013

Primary industry experts on National Science Challenges panel on National Science Challenges Panel:

Federated Farmers is excited three experts from the primary industries are part of the eleven person panel charged with identifying New Zealand’s science challenges.

“We are excited to see the primary industries are part of tomorrow’s world,” says Dr William Rolleston, Federated Farmers spokesperson on food production sciences.

“We have three experts representing the primary industries and this underscores that primary food production and value-added processing is not just about the now, but the future too.

“Plant and Food Research’s Chief Scientist, Dr Ian Ferguson and Waikato University’s Professor Jacqueline Rowarth are highly regarded scientists.

“Both have received Royal Honours for their contribution with Professor Rowarth being a former Federated Farmers Agri-Personality of the Year. . .

Range of investors expected in regional irrigation schemes:

The superannuation fund, ACC and other private equity funds are expected to be among key investors in regional irrigation schemes, partnering with the state and regional councils.

The Government will set up a company to spend an initial $80 million on irrigation projects.

Paul Callow, a Deloitte’s partner who specialises in infrastructure and energy, says the Crown-owned company will operate like Crown Fibre Holdings, which was set up for the rollout of ultra-fast broadband.

He says the problem with projects like irrigation is that a very large capital investment is needed when there is an uncertain uptake and the private sector is not usually very enthusiastic about that risk profile. . .

Primary ITO welcomes changes to apprenticeship schemes:

The Primary Industry Training Organisation (Primary ITO) welcomes the new apprenticeship initiatives announced by government following the 18-month industry training review. Primary ITO is one of the largest ITO’s in New Zealand, facilitating training in the agriculture, horticulture, equine, water and sports turf sectors.

As the primary industry is one of New Zealand’s most important sectors, investing in the skills and knowledge of our people ensures the primary sector continues to thrive. Agricultural and horticultural products account for 40% of New Zealand’s exports. Education is vital to ensuring the productivity and profitability of the primary industries.

The recently announced changes mean that Modern Apprenticeships and other apprenticeship-type training will come under an expanded and improved scheme called New Zealand Apprenticeships. . .

First Steps to Better Farm Business Governance –  Pasture to Profit:

Good Farm Governance…”A process of Getting Advice to provide a Better Perspective”

Good Governance, Management and Operational efficiency are critical to all dairy farm businesses.

First Step to Better Farm Business Governance is to separate the Farm roles.

On every dairy farm there are Operational tasks where most dairy farmers spend most of their time (day to day routine jobs). The Management role which is making tactical decisions (organising & controlling land, resources & people).  Management is about making decisions. These tactical decisions often relate to this week or over the next one or two months.

Governance is the big picture strategy “what business are we really in? What personal & family values are really important to our business? . .

2013 AgriKidsNZ Competition set to sizzle:

The AgriKidsNZ Competition is about to launch into the Regional Finals stage around New Zealand and over 600 Primary School children are in agreement that the Regionals are the place to be!

New Zealand Young Farmers (NZYF) organise the competitions which take place alongside the ANZ Young Farmer Contest Regional Finals and TeenAg Competitions from February 9th to March 31st. The first AgriKidsNZ Regional Final takes place this weekend on Saturday 9th February in Whangarei at the Barge Park Showgrounds.

Teams of three will be tested on their knowledge of all things farming and all things New Zealand and after a whopping 600 children competed last year, organisers are looking forward to more of the same great action this year. . .

Loving the man and the land – Art 4 Agriculture:

Today’s guest blog by journalist turned farmer Bessie Blore comes to us with these words of wisdon

… there is room for fresh blood in our farming future, and there are new, inspiring, exciting stories to be started from today…

Bessie story is a fascinating and very entertaining tale.indeed. I don’t know about you but when I read this I thought to myself this must be one handsome man and one special girl.

Now we’re the only two human inhabitants of “Burragan,” 70,000 acres of grazing land, more than 100 kilometres from the closest town of Wilcannia. And over the past 24 months I have developed a passion for life on the land, and wool growing in particular, that borders on crazed and psychotic at times, I’m sure most of my city friends think I’m far too enthusiastic about dirt, sheep, and isolation.

Seriously 100 km from the closest town!!!!. You would want to pay close attention to detail writing the grocery list. . .

And:
Photo


Science leader for MPI

21/08/2012

The Prime Minister has had a chief science advisor since early in his first term, now the Ministry of Primary Industries has a science leader too:

Dr Ian Ferguson (MNZM) has been appointed to the newly created position of Departmental Science Adviser for the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), Deputy Director General of Policy Paul Stocks announced today.

“This is an exceptionally important role for the Ministry,” Mr Stocks said. “I am confident that Dr Ferguson will provide strong science leadership to ensure that MPI is well connected across government and with the science community, and will continue to produce high quality scientific advice.”

The role focuses on the key areas of quality assurance of science inputs into regulatory decision making; strategic direction for science investment; and ensuring that MPI is able to effectively deal with emerging risks and opportunities. . .

The recognition of the importance of a scientific approach to policy is welcome. It is especially important in the MPI which oversees the productive industries which play such an important role in the economy and have such an impact on the environment.

It’s very easy for governments to have good ideas,  ensuring they are based on sound science will help to ensure they work in practice.


%d bloggers like this: