Tell me again. . .

September 29, 2019

. . . why daylight saving starts so soon?


Another week of dark mornings

March 30, 2019

The sun was just starting to rise at 6:50ish a couple of weeks ago.

Last week it was only just getting light at 7:15ish.

We’ve got another week until the clocks go back.

Sigh mutter, mumble.

Daylight saving starts to early and finishes too late.


Mutter mumble #%$**&^%$!

September 30, 2018

It’s that time of year again.

It was getting light around 6am until this morning. Now we’ve lost an hour ant it’s dark until nearly 7am.

It wouldn’t be so bad if there was both sufficient light and warmth in the evening. But we’ve only just passed the spring equinox, there was fresh snow on the Kakanuis a few days ago and it’s still too cool and dark too early at the end of the day.

In another few weeks when the sun has moved further south it will be lighter, and hopefully warmer, at both ends of the day.

Until then I will resent the lost hour in the morning – and those getting up earlier to milk, shear, muster, nurse or any of the other worst hat requires early starts will lament the cold, dark, later dawn even more.


Sunday soapbox

September 30, 2018

Sunday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation. You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, amuse, bemuse or simply muse, but not abuse.

When told the reason for daylight saving time the old Indian said, “Only the government would believe that you could cut a good off the top of a blanket, sew it to the bottom and have a longer blanket.


Dunne and dusted

August 21, 2017

Ohariu MP Peter Dunne has announced his retirement.

“The current political environment is extremely volatile and unpredictable. However, I have concluded, based on recent polling, and other soundings I have been taking over the last few weeks, that, the volatility and uncertainty notwithstanding, there is now a mood amongst Ōhāriu voters for a change of MP, which is unlikely to alter. This shift in voter sentiment is quite at variance with polling and other data I have seen throughout the year, upon which I had based my earlier decision to seek re-election for a 12th term as MP for Ōhāriu. While I am naturally extremely disappointed after 33 years of service at this apparent change of feeling, I recognise and understand it, and respect absolutely the electorate’s prerogative to feel that way.

“I have therefore decided that it is time for me to stand aside, so the people of Ōhāriu can elect a new electorate MP. Consequently, after much consideration and discussion with those closest to me, I am announcing today that I will not be putting forward my nomination for election to the next Parliament. I do so with considerable reluctance, but I have always understood that holding public office is a temporary privilege granted by the people, and can never be taken for granted. . .

Dunne was a good electorate MP who got support in spite of his party rather than because of it.

A good proportion of that was from National supporters who understood that under MMP, Dunne’s support could make the difference between being in government or opposition.

It would have been galling for them that their votes enabled him to be a minister in three successive Labour-led governments.

It would also have been galling that while he gave National confidence and supply, he often voted against the party on other issues.

One of his initiatives was to extend the length of daylight saving, moving the start to the end of September and the end to the start of April.

That makes early mornings darker for southerners for several weeks than is optimal.

In making the change he appeared not to understand that in autumn and spring we don’t get enough daylight hours to gain any benefit from    having the clocks forward an hour.

It is unfortunate that his resignation comes after parliament has risen. A politician with his length of service would have had an interesting valedictory statement.

This will be the end of United Future which is barely registering in any poll.


Clocks forward permanently

April 1, 2017

The scheduled return to standard New Zealand time tomorrow morning has been cancelled and clocks will stay one-hour ahead permanently.

A spokesman for the Department of Infernal Affairs, Ms Sunny Disposition said that putting clocks back signalled the start of winter to many people and since summer weather had been so disappointing, few if any were ready for it.

“Most people agree daylight saving is good and if some is good then ipso facto more must be better,” she said.

“We can’t change the weather, but we can keep the clocks forward and allow people more daylight. The sun comes out in the day and after the sorry excuse for summer over much of the country that’s what we need to cheer us all up – more day and less night.

“We’ll all get more vitamin D and save power with less need for electric lights.”

A reporter who pointed out that whether or not clocks stayed forward an hour, there would be less daylight as the sun moved north, was told that wasn’t in the Department’s brief.

“Clocks and time are our preserve, if you have a question about the sun you’d be better talking to Met Service or NIWA,” Miss Disposition said.

“I understand someone from one or other of them will be available to talk around mid day.”

 

 


366 days of gratitude

April 3, 2016

More than not a day too soon, at least a couple of weeks too late, the clocks went backwards early this morning.

Yesterday the sun didn’t rise until around 7:30, this morning it was an hour earlier and oh how I’m grateful for that.


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