No “only” about .9%

February 23, 2016

One criticism of the Trans Pacific Partnership is that it will add “only” .9% to New Zealand’s GDP.

Politik has the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade’s response to  two economic studies quoted by Labour  using that figure to justify criticism of the deal.

MFAT Chief Negotiator David Walker says that 0.9% increase in baseline GDP in 2030 is equivalent to NZ$2.7 billion.

There is no “only” about $2.7 billion.


Rural round-up

June 23, 2015

Water presents high risk to agribusiness:

Whether it’s growing crops, generating electricity or entertaining tourists, water is a key ingredient for the success of the New Zealand economy, yet this also makes it a key risk.

PwC’s latest publication, Preserving water through collaboration that works, considers how New Zealand within a global context, has responded to water risks and the potential to improve water management in the future. New Zealand faces its own risks which differ from those in other parts of the world, and these risks, are increasing.

PwC Director and Local Government expert David Walker says, “A usable supply of water is fundamental to the New Zealand economy and permeates across all industries – and notably farming, forestry, electricity generation and public sectors. However continued effective water management is becoming more complex and costly. . .

ASB Farmshed Economics Report Cash is king for farmers

• Despite a better milk price forecast, farm cashflows will remain weak this season.

• But falling interest rates are putting cash back in farmers’ pockets.

• Meanwhile, the hot air has been let out of the NZ dollar.

Despite Fonterra’s better opening season milk price forecast, farm cashflows will still face pressure this season, according to the latest ASB Farmshed Economics Report. . .

 

TPP dairy deal ‘not at a level we would currently like’, says Key – Pattrick Smellie:

(BusinessDesk) – The Trans-Pacific Partnership trade pact does not yet include an acceptable deal on access for New Zealand’s most important exports, dairy products, with little more than a month to go before the controversial 12 nation trade deal could be concluded.

“I think the way I would describe it is there’s a deal. It’s probably not at the level that we would currently like,” said Prime Minister John Key at his post-Cabinet press conference in Wellington. He was referring to comments last week by Trade Minister Tim Groser that negotiations on dairy access to the heavily protected US, Canadian and Japanese markets had “barely started.” . . .

A2 shareholder Freedom Foods in consortium to take over milk marketer – Fiona Rotherham:

(BusinessDesk) – A2 Milk Co’s cornerstone shareholder, Freedom Foods Group, is part of a consortium with an international dairy group that’s eyeing a takeover of the dual-listed milk marketer.

Freedom Foods, which owns about 19 percent of A2 Milk with a related entity, is mulling a takeover of A2 Milk, making an indicative non-binding and conditional expression of interest to buy the shares it doesn’t already own. A deal would be contingent on the consortium, which includes an “unnamed leading international liquid dairy milk company”, undertaking due diligence. It also has a restriction on A2 Milk changing the number of shares on issue, effectively scotching a planned equity raising. . .

LIC seeks $125M debt facilities this year, targets $140M equity over decade – Jonathan Underhill:

Livestock Improvement Corp, which aims to lift annual revenue to $1 billion by 2025, says it plans to establish $125 million of debt facilities this year and is likely to require $140 million in equity capital over the next 10 years to meet its growth goals.

Details of its capital requirements are included in a presentation the bull semen and dairy genetics database manager is taking around the country to explain to its shareholders how its changing focus, with increased capital spending and new product development, is changing its financial profile. Previously it has only required seasonal debt funding, typically for three months, the presentation shows. .

Upper South Island Butchers Battle It Out:

The best young butchers in the Upper South Island have been announced following the Alto Young Butcher and Competenz Butcher Apprentice of the Year regional final on Saturday.

Rowan Lee from Peter Timbs in Bishopdale was the winner of the Alto Young Butcher category, while Matthew Clemens from New World Ilam topped the Competenz Butcher Apprentice category, both highly sought after titles. . .

 

Tractor and Machinery Association elects new President:

Mark Hamilton-Manns, New Zealand Sales Manager for John Deere, has been elected President of the Tractor and Machinery Association (TAMA).

Formerly Vice President of the organisation, he takes over from Ian Massicks, New Zealand Kubota Manager for CB Norwood Distributors, who had been President for six years.

Roger Nehoff, General Manager New Zealand Retail for Landpower New Zealand, was elected Vice-President. . .


Rural round-up

December 1, 2013

Best little river in New Zealand – Rebecca Fox:

Gradual improvements in water quality in East Otago’s Shag River over nearly a decade have earned it the grand prize in the inaugural 2013 New Zealand River Awards.

”The Shag is the best little river in New Zealand,” Otago Regional Council chairman Stephen Woodhead, said when he accepted the award at a ceremony in Wellington last night.

He said the award was for the river’s community and recognition of the work landowners had done to improve practices on land through which the river flowed. . .

Good things take time:

Federated Farmers is thrilled by the recognition Otago farmers received at the first New Zealand River Awards last night, with two rivers as finalists and the Shag River taking the prize for most improved river in New Zealand. 

“The Shag River has come a long way from 10 years ago, and it is a credit to those farmers who care for and value their river,” says Ian Mackenzie, Federated Farmers water spokesperson.

“Change is hard for everyone, but once you take the time to get everyone on board you can really make a difference. Changing the result of 30 years of degradation is not a quick fix, there is no instant gratification, so that is why 10 years on from the water management plan’s implementation you are seeing some positive results. . .

Beetle’s prickly appetite could have wider impact– Tony Benny:

Scientists hope a thistle-munching beetle already reducing prickly weed infestations in the south will also lay waste to hard-to-control Californian thistles on North Canterbury hill country farms.

Landcare released European-sourced green thistle beetles – also known as cassida or tortoise beetles – on about 50 farms, mostly in lowland Southland, five years ago.

AgResearch scientists want to find out more about the beetle and see if it can go to work in the hill country of North Canterbury and the North Island.

“We’re starting to see the effects of the beetle, and Southland farmers are thinking that it’s having quite a good effect on the thistle populations there,” said AgResearch scientist Michael Cripps. “Basically, they’re seeing observational evidence of a decline in the thistle population.” . . .

Pastoral farmers asked to think pig, poultry-style – Tim Fulton:

CANTERBURY farmers affected by Chilean Needle Grass (CNG) have been encouraged by local support for their position but the regional council warns the grass can still take root any time and place.

ECan’s latest biosecurity newsletter suggests pastoral farmers take similar precautions to pig and poultry farmers, by controlling movement of people, vehicles and machinery on and off their property

Sheep farmer Owen Gould from Parnassus in the Hurunui district has clarified the extent of CNG on his place, hoping to make other farmers aware of the plant and steps to contain it. . .

Govt help unlikely – Alan Williams:

Three of New Zealand’s biggest meat companies took a restructuring proposal to the Government but were told they would need more substantial industry and farmer support before it could help with legislation.

The reaction has negative implications for any plan involving a merger between only two players, the Silver Fern Farms and Alliance Group co-operatives.

In its campaigning to get candidates elected to the boards of the two co-ops, the Meat Industry Excellence (MIE) group has suggested the Government would legislate to provide protection for their 52-54% market share in the early stages of a merged entity. . .

David makes old Goliath steam:

When David Walker first saw the 1901 traction engine at a Marlborough winery it was a hulk.

He described its condition as “rust value only” when he took delivery on April 16 this year.

However, the committed restorer had the rare 10 horsepower steam driven engine up and running, albeit minus its pin-striping, in time for the weekend’s Nelson A&P Show.

“It hadn’t been steamed up in 62 years,” said Mr Walker of his latest prize. To get it operational he had to replace, rebuild or repair nearly every moving part. . .

NZB National Yearling Sales Series Catalogues Online Today:

The catalogues for New Zealand Bloodstock’s 88th National Yearling Sales Series are now available online.

A total of 1371 yearlings have been catalogued across the three sales sessions of Karaka’s week-long auction extravaganza, starting on Monday 27 January 2014.
Premier Cover

The PREMIER SALE catalogue features a world-class line-up of 469 Lots – 28 more than in January 2013 – set to be offered over two days on Monday 27 & Tuesday 28 January, commencing at 11am each day. . .


Feds to recognise Cream of the Crop

June 20, 2009

Federated Farmers plans to recognise the best of New Zealand Agriculture with the Cream of the Crop awards at its annual conference.

The Agribusiness Person of the Year and Agribusiness Personality of the Year will be judged by farmer and former All Black Sir Colin Meads, business woman Anna Stretton, Auckland Mayor John Banks and David Walker from Geni.

President Don Nicolson said other agribusiness award winners would also be honoured, including: the winners of the Ballance Farm Environment Awards; The National Bank Young Farmer of the Year; The Ahuwhenua Trophy – BNZ Maori Excellence in Farming Award; Lincoln University Foundation South Island Farmer of the Year; Rural Women New Zealand Enterprising Rural Woman Award winners; New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards Sharemilkers of the Year; New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards Farm Manager of the Year  and New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards Dairy Trainee of the Year.

The awards ceremony will take place in Auckland on July 1.


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