Rural round-up

December 8, 2018

Research farm breaks new ground – Nigel Malthus:

Farmers are hearing that Beef + Lamb NZ is “putting your money where our mouth is” as it launches an innovative research partnership.

Chief executive Sam McIvor made the remark at the formal launch of the North Canterbury Future Farm, a 50:50 farming partnership between BLNZ and a company formed by local farmers.

Together they are leasing Lanercost Farm, a 1310ha sheep and beef property in the Leader Valley, north of Cheviot in North Canterbury. . . 

Fantastic velvet and venison prospects excite deer veteran – Annette Scott:

The deer industry is in a good spot and farmers should be happy with how their industry levies are being spent, Deer Farmers’ Association executive member David Morgan says.

Farming deer at Raincliff Station in South Canterbury, Morgan is as excited about the industry now as he was when he came to New Zealand as an 18-year-old on work experience.

Originally from Wales, Morgan has farmed deer all his life and it was that first NZ experience that got him started.

“I saw what could be done with deer and went back home to set up a deer farm and farm deer for venison supply. . . 

Bring on 2019:

Without doubt, 2018 will be remembered as Fonterra’s annus horribilis.

It is not overstating the case to say that the past year has seen a series of failures and fiascos for the dairy co-op.

For the first time, it reported a net loss for the financial year of $196 million. Meanwhile, weaker global dairy prices have forced the co-op to keep lowering its forecast payout from an opening estimate of $7/kgMS in May to $6.25 to $6.50/kgMS . . 

Farmer’s widow fulfils husband’s dying wish to win fight against DOC – Gerald Piddock:

Murray Ward always knew he was right but never lived to see it proven. 

Instead his widow Evelyn is left to savour a bitter victory after an 18 year battle against officialdom over a drainage system that left part of the couple’s Waikato farm under a toxic lake and Murray urging his family from his deathbed to continue the fight. 

Now Evelyn fears that despite a court victory she may not live to see everything put right. . . 

Government and industry partners release report on biological emissions:

A new report shows many farmers want to take action to reduce emissions, but need more information about what steps they can take.

It also shows if all farmers operated using today’s best practice, we may be able to reduce emissions by up to 10%. Continued funding for research into new, novel technologies will be important for reducing emissions further.

The Biological Emissions Reference Group Report is the culmination of two years of research into the opportunities, costs and barriers to reducing biological emissions in New Zealand’s primary industries. . . 

Raise a glass to dairy emissions intensity progress:

New analysis shows that dairy farmers around the world are making significant progress lowering the greenhouse gas emission intensity of milk production, Federated Farmers climate change spokesperson Andrew Hoggard says.

“It’s clear that while New Zealand dairy farmers must continue their ongoing efforts to boost productivity and reduce their environmental footprint, on the global emissions and food security front the best thing we can do is to help dairy farmers in developing nations get to where we already are,” says Andrew, who owns and runs a dairy farm in the Manawatu. . . 

Farmers Smeared by Smirnoff Over Non-GMO label? – Chris Bennett:

After a day in Kansas corn, Cole Nondorf lay in bed watching evening television’s requisite barrage of commercials when he was jolted him from near-slumber by a 16-second advertisement. He watched as celebrity faces Ted Danson and Jenna Fischer cheerfully pronounced Smirnoff’s base vodka, No. 21, as non-GMO. Adios to GMO grain and welcome to the inference of health—even inside a bottle of booze. Nondorf sat up, looked at his wife, Allison, and muted the television, “Are they joking? Enough. That is enough.”

When Smirnoff kicked off a promotional campaign in October 2018, touting its No. 21 vodka as free from GMO corn, a Kansas farming couple crossed a business Rubicon. The Nondorfs swept Smirnoff products from the shelves of their liquor store after the commercial aired. The result? A wave of support from farm country and beyond.

Real Life

Tucked in Sheridan County, in the northwest quarter of the Jayhawk State, the Nondorf operation is a mix of cattle, corn, grain sorghum, soybeans and wheat. The Nondorfs, both 36, also own A & C Liquid Assets, a wine and spirits business located in Hoxie, just off Highway 24, 20 miles north of I-70: Toss a dart at Hoxie on a wall map and the point will land center of Colorado Springs, Denver, Wichita and Kansas City. . . 

 


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