Rural round-up

November 10, 2016

Significant Concerns Raised by Feds’ Healthy Rivers Project:

Discussions held with Waikato Federated Farmers members have revealed significant concerns about the impact of the Waikato Regional Council’s proposed ‘Plan Change One’.

Federated Farmers hosted a meeting for the release of the report on its Farm Plan Project, which aimed to test drive the Farm Environment Plan part the proposed ‘Healthy Rivers’ Plan.

The Farm Plan Project used 13 Waikato (mainly drystock) farms as case studies to implement the ‘Farm Environment Plans’ which will be required by the new council Plan.

Fonterra also ran a parallel process which are in the report to look at the effects on 11 Fonterra dairy farms. . . 

Fishing industry’s elder statesman had salt in his blood – Mike Watson:

OBITUARY: Commercial fishing’s elder statesman, Edward ‘Ted’ Laurence Collins, would be remembered as much for his generosity and support of the fishing industry as his broad physique honed from breaking underwater swimming records as a school boy in Marlborough.

Born in Blenheim, Collins lived all his life in Marlborough, settling in Spring Creek with his wife, Gwen, and daughters Jan and Sue, and son Peter.

He began work as a farmer but soon followed his passion to become a commercial fisherman and fishery advocate during a period of great change in the industry which included the introduction of the quota management system, and the establishment of the exclusive economic zone. . . 

Pastures most valuable crops – Richard Rennie:

Ryegrass and clover reign supreme on the charts as New Zealand’s most valuable crops.  

They came out on top in a Ministry for Primary Industries report that took stock of the country’s top 65 crops by value to the economy.  

The report compiled by the Institute for Economic Research was the first time an attempt had been made to quantify the entire range of grasses and horticultural and tree crops cultivated for commercial purposes.  The authors noted previous efforts had viewed the value of crops individually and had examined only the exported value of specific crops. . . 

A world full of cameras seems to target farmers – James Stewart:

 Life in the 21st century means we are all on show. 

Our world is now full of cameras.  From closed circuit television (CCTV) to smart phones, the new age means that instantly our actions can be streamed to the world to view. 

In seconds you can go from zero to hero.  Or for our local All Black legend Aaron Smith, all it takes is 10 minutes of lurking outside public toilets, and you are temporarily a national disgrace.

In my own backyard, the recent footage by Farmwatch has hit home how much of a target us farmers have become.  We are under scrutiny and to be honest, I’m going to have to hold back on a few four letter profanities about how this really makes me feel. . . 

A2 Milk reports first quarter revenue of $112.5 mln, shares rise 4%  –  Edwin Mitson:

(BusinessDesk) – A2 Milk, which markets milk based on the supposed health benefits of the A2 milk protein, says first quarter sales met expectations with sales driven by growth in infant formula and milk. The shares rose 4 percent on the update.

The Auckland-based, Sydney-headquartered company reported revenue of $112.5 million in the three months ended Sept. 30 in a presentation by chief executive Geoffrey Babidge to a UBS conference in Sydney. Sales of fresh milk in Australia and New Zealand were up 7 percent from a year earlier.

Babidge also said there had been “continued and consistent growth” in consumer demand for its A2 Platinum infant formula, despite research reports suggesting demand would be volatile. . . 

$75,000 Awarded to Conservation Innovators:

Using drone trackers for wildlife research, monitoring health of waterways and developing an app to help Kauri conservation – these are the winning ideas of WWF’s 2016 Conservation Innovation Awards, announced today.

The Kiwi innovators behind these ideas will each be awarded a $25,000 grant to recognise their contribution to innovation in conservation. The three winners will be congratulated at an event in Wellington tonight, MCed by journalist and public speaker, Rod Oram, and with Hon Steven Joyce, Minister of Science and Innovation, as the keynote speaker.

The winning ideas are:

DroneCounts
DroneCounts wants to take wildlife tracking to the next level, with a model that can pick up several signals and map wildlife in an area. . . 

Lazy Scumbags Prey on Young Couple – Rick Powdrell:

Once again stock theft is in the news. Some scumbags too lazy to rear their own calves wait for an enterprising couple to do the hard yards, then steal 55 of their animals.

This young Canterbury couple are working multiple jobs as well as rearing calves to get ahead in life. Rearing calves alone is a time-consuming job, with morning and evening feeding, individual animal attention required to ensure good animal health, plus the necessary cleaning to maintain a healthy environment.

This couple have clear goals on what their future holds and one just around the corner, their marriage, has now been pushed out into the future.

This theft highlights many of the factors being promoted around New Zealand at the combined FMG / NZ Police / Federated Farmers Rural Crime Prevention Workshops. . . 

Honey wars: crime and killings in New Zealand’s manuka honey industry –  Eleanor Ainge Roy:

It was the day the bees died – tens of thousands of them in 300 hives, mysteriously killed.

“The massacre”, as it is being called, happened in the otherwise idyllic landscape of Doubtless Bay in New Zealand’s far north.

And for David Yanke and Rachel Kearney, co-owners of Daykel Apiaries, the cause of death was obvious: malicious poisoning.

“It is a nightmare, I don’t feel safe any more,” says Kearney as she sits at her kitchen table on her family’s farm, 40km east of the Northland hub of Kaitaia. “I feel violated. It has almost turned into a PTSD [post-traumatic stress disorder] experience for me.” . . 

Scheme spurs massive re-think :

Four years ago, when David Kidd took over the management of 555ha of leased bare land overlooking the Kaipara Harbour, he knew he had work to do.

He and his employer, McEwan-Kidd partnership, began an intensive development programme which included subdivision, installing a water system and carrying out fertiliser and pasture renewal programmes.

They also set up a cattle-only stock policy on the flat to rolling land, running Angus breeding cows, beef bulls, trading heifers and steers – amounting to 5000-6000 stock units. . . 

Mid-season pulse check:

Owl Farm’s final Farm Focus Day of 2016 takes place on 16 November. “As usual we have a great calibre of speakers on hand to share progress to date, and to look towards the future,” says Farm Demonstration Manager Doug Dibley.

“Although it’s been a pretty wet and bleak start to the dairy season with the continuous rain we’ve received, there has been a silver lining seen through the slow recovery of the global markets. This renewed confidence has seen Fonterra twice increase their forecast farm gate milk price. We have Matt Bolger of Fonterra coming to share with us where they see things heading in the next 12 to 18 months and what we can expect as a result.” . . 


Rural round-up

July 7, 2014

From southern farmer to Featherston Street – Gerard Hutching:

One senses Conor English is not the sentimental sort. And yet he confesses to “just about crying” the day he sold a John Deere 1075 Hydro 4 header.

No coincidence, then, that the outgoing Federated Farmers chief executive has a desk littered with models of Massey Ferguson and JD farm machinery.

And although it is about 20 years since he worked fulltime on a farm, he can still wax lyrical over a Massey 188 or a JD 44-40 cropping tractor. Today’s machines, however, are “like 747s” compared to the tractors of yesteryear.

So English knows his way around a farm. Until he arrived in Wellington in the early 1990s, he was in a partnership in Dipton, Southland, near the family farm. . .

Young farmer of the year betters dad’s efforts – Tony Benny:

The winner of the ANZ Young Farmer Contest 2014 grand final David Kidd made history by being the first winner to come from the Northern region in the competition’s 46 year history.

Kidd topped his father Richard’s achievement of coming third in the 1984 final and confessed he’d likely give dad some cheek about their respective finishes.

”Let’s set this as the benchmark for the northern region’s competitor and let’s start a dynasty of northern region chalking up some bolds on the back of that Grand Final programme,” Kidd said after the televised final in Christchurch’s SBS Arena.

With the other six regional finalists Kidd spent Thursday and Friday competing on and off the farm. They had to make a market innovation presentation, sit a written exam, be interviewed, face an HR challenge and give a speech. On-farm competition included hanging gates, cutting up a lamb carcass, welding and splitting firewood. . .

Shearing marathon for cancer – Sally Rae:

Shearing has always been a hobby for Tarras stock manager Cole Wells – but now he had decided to take it one giant step further.

Next year, Mr Wells (28) plans to shear over a 24-hour period – with a break every two hours – to raise money for the Cancer Society, particularly for the research and treatment of prostate cancer.

His goal is to shear between about 750 and 800 crossbred lambs and he has a fundraising target of $24,000, which equates to $1000 an hour. . .

Support needed for dairy hub:

Plans to establish a $26.5 million permanent commercial demonstration dairy farm in Southland need the support of dairy farmers in the region.

”We have one shot to get this right and we need the Southern community behind us, because it is not going to happen without it,” Southern Dairy Development Trust (SDDT) chairman Matthew Richards said.

Mr Richards and project leader Maurice Hardie presented the proposal at an Environment Southland meeting in April. . .

Keen for another crack at TeenAg title – Sally Rae:

Admittedly, there was a little sibling rivalry when the High Country Hillbillies took on the Gumboot Girls – and the rest of New Zealand – in the TeenAg national final.

Holly Malcolm (15) and Ella Sanderson (14), the High Country Hillbillies, and Holly’s sister Georgia (16) and Brittany Caldwell (16), the Gumboot Girls, were representing Aorangi, along with Cody Callaghan and Thomas Yeatman, from Timaru Boys’ High School. . .

Teaching excellence recognised:

Last night, the Prime Minister presented the 2014 Tertiary Teaching Excellence Awards at a ceremony in Wellington.

Dr Rainer Hofmann, Senior Lecturer in the Faculty of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Lincoln University, was one of the 2014 recipients.  The nomination recognised Rainer’s ability to reach out to his students to establish relevance and to stimulate real interest as their motivation for learning.   His teaching practices start with the relationship – to produce engaged and successful students by providing the environment for them to want to learn, and to flourish.  The subtle techniques used by Rainer ensure each student can enjoy, and benefit from, the learning environment whilst being pushed to achieve their potential – almost without them realising it because they are enjoying the experience.   

“Rainer embodies the concept of attachment-based learning.  His engaging attitude makes learning easy and his masterful teaching promotes deep, enquiring and life-long learning,” said University of Otago Senior Lecturer, Dr Kumari Valentine, in support of Rainer’s nomination.  . .


Rural round-up

July 6, 2014

Young Farmer named for 2014:

David Kidd has beaten seven finalists over three days of competition to become the 2014 Young Farmer of the year.

In the 46 years of the contest’s history, Mr Kidd is the first Northern region finalist to take the title.

His father Richard Kidd was third in a young farmer competition in 1984.

Mr Kidd joked his inspiration for competing was to better his father and said he’ll be rubbing it in when he sees him. . .

Evil among us – farm community closes ranks – Rebecca Ryan:

The quiet and friendly community of Ngapara has been shaken.

Neighbours are watching out for neighbours, new chains and locks have been placed on gates and security cameras on fence posts, some residents are unable to sleep at night and farmers are requiring help to carry out basic farm work – all fearful after a mass killing of more than 215 sheep on two different properties in the area, two weekends in a row.

They are all hopeful the culprit, or culprits, do not return this weekend.

Police believe the killings may be linked and a firearm was used in both. . .

Dairy head to focus on environment – Gerard Hutching:

Newly elected Federated Farmers dairy chairman Andrew Hoggard said focusing on the environment was one of his two main priorities.

The other was to deal with the issue of labour standards.

A Feilding dairy farmer, Hoggard said it frustrated him that farmers were always trying to play catch up when it came to dealing with environmental issues.

He acknowledged there was a “real issue” of water quality being affected by dairying.

“Cows urinate and that’s got a lot of nitrogen in it, but a lot of people perceive there’s a pipe coming out of a cow shed and into a river. There are a few ratbags but things are in place for farmers to do the right thing. I don’t defend those who don’t,” he said. . .

Firm finds cunning niches – Emma Rawson:

From a mechanism that cleans up geese poop, to small parts for a Fisher & Paykel baby incubator – the range of machinery designed and manufactured by Dannevirke company Metalform is about as broad as it gets.

But the products have one thing in common: they provide solutions to problems deemed too small for the big international manufacturing giants to produce.

Solving Canada’s geese waste issue might not be big business for an agricultural giant like John Deere, but for family-owned Metalform, its Tow and Collect product has been a winner.

Tow and Collect is being used in North American towns to clean up after Canadian geese, which leave a large volume of mess on golf courses and parks during their migration. . .

Fieldays set to get even bigger – Andrea Fox:

National Fieldays will offer up to 100 extra exhibitor sites next year and a new dairy innovation centre is in the pipeline.

Chief executive Jon Calder said the new sites were part of a master plan for the Mystery Creek Events Centre and would maximise the central exhibition space area.

Large-scale exhibitors who have been seeking a new area are likely to benefit but Calder said the flow-on effect for all exhibitors of an improved design and layout would be positive.

The planned dairy innovation centre, which might not be ready until 2016, would be based on a pavilion model in Canada and would bring together in one area exhibits devoted to the dairy industry, including a herd of cows, live robotic milking, interactive plant and equipment displays, and effluent systems, Calder said. . .

Fonterra targets audience of two billion – Hugh Stringleman:

Fonterra intends to be a dairy co-operative that makes a difference in the lives of two billion people by 2025, chief executive Theo Spierings says.

It was already the world’s largest milk processor and dairy exporter and now it wanted to be a globally relevant co-operative, Spierings said.

Growth in demand was forecast to exceed dairy product supply growth by 3% each year in the massive markets of China and India from now until 2020, he said.

India’s forecast compound annual growth rate was 10% and China’s 7%, whereas their supply growth rates were 7% and 4% respectively. . . .

Life in the saddle – Pip Courtney:

PIP COURTNEY, PRESENTER: In the bush, no-one likes a skite. But while modesty’s an admirable trait, it’s kept many with fascinating lives from writing their memoirs.

Alwyn Torenbeek’s a good example. Despite an extraordinary life, it took years of badgering from his family before the 77-year-old retired drover agreed to put pen to paper.

At just 21, he was Australia’s bronc-riding champion, known for his bravery, natural talent and cheeky showmanship. But his biography is about more than fame. There’s adventure, tragedy, romance and mateship, and that indomitable bush trait, endurance.

An endurance riding camp has its own pace. There’s plenty of time to catch up with mates and swap stories, some of them tall.

At Alwyn Torenbeek’s camp, you’re assured of a yarn or five. . .

Good calving nutrition can better support calving season

With calving season just around the corner, the Dairy Women’s Network (DWN) and SealesWinslow have teamed up to educate dairying women around the importance of good calf nutrition.

Ballance Agri-Nutrients, through its animal nutrition business, SealesWinslow, will be running a series of interactive calf nutrition days across nine locations in New Zealand during June and July.

Mike Stephens, dairy category manager for Ballance Agri-Nutrients said the sessions will provide participants with practical, hands-on skills to raise healthy calves and, in the long term, build healthier and more profitable herds. . .


Rural round-up

March 18, 2014

New staff to boost border security:

26 New Ministry for Primary Industries border staff begin training in Auckland today as part of a programme to beef up frontline resources, Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy has announced today.

“Close to 125 new quarantine inspectors have joined MPI in the last 18 months and this is another big boost in resources.

“The 26 new staff will graduate around the middle of this year and will be posted around New Zealand.

“While there is increasing use of technology and intelligence to protect our border, we still need people on the frontline.

“Biosecurity is my number one priority as Minister because it is so important in protecting our economy. We know that unwanted pests and diseases can have devastating effects on our farmers and growers. . .

Clover root weevil under attack in Southland – Sally Rae:

An industry-wide effort is under way in Southland to combat the damaging clover root weevil, whose economic damage has been measured in hundreds of millions of dollars nationwide.

Clover root weevil (CRW), identified by distinctive U-shaped notches on clover leaves, was discovered in the Waikato and Auckland in 1996 and has now spread as far as Southland.

A project, involving AgResearch, Beef and Lamb New Zealand, DairyNZ and Environment Southland, which has been releasing parasitised clover root weevils on Southland farms, is being accelerated. . .

Fonterra Chairman Visits New $126m UHT Milk Processing Site:

Fonterra Chairman John Wilson visited Fonterra’s new $126 million UHT milk processing site at Waitoa on the weekend.The site is in its final stages of testing before commissioning Anchor UHT milk and cream products at the end of this month.

Mr Wilson said he was impressed with how quickly it had taken the site to get to this stage with construction completed in 12 months.

“It was great to get the chance to visit and meet the team who have brought our Waitoa site to life. There is a real sense of pride from the team on the ground.  . . .

History repeats itself in Northland:

David Kidd is the fourth Grand Finalist to be named in the 2014 ANZ Young Farmer Contest.

The thirty year old sheep and beef farm manager of Shelley Beach took first place at the Northern Regional Final at the Kaikohe Showgrounds over the weekend, Saturday 15 March.

Thirty years after Mr Kidd’s father, Richard Kidd, became a Grand Finalist David is following in his footsteps. Richard placed third (on count back) in the 1984 Timaru Grand Final representing the Northern Region. “I don’t remember it, but I was at that Grand Final and it was my first Young Farmers experience,” said Mr Kidd. . .

Meet Dr Sunday – Alice Roberts:

A doctor living in rural Queensland says it’s the patients who have kept him in town for the past decade.

Dr Sunday Adebiyi has been a general practitioner in Dysart for 10 years.

He says it’s the friendships you strike up in regional areas that make the job worthwhile.

“I have some very, very good patients and I think about them and they think about me, they are concerned about my welfare and how I’m going,” he says.

“So with such people it would be very difficult to let them down. . .

Rabobank business alumni tour successful South Island farms:

More than 80 New Zealand and Australian farmers toured South Island farms last week as part of Rabobank’s Business Management Programme alumni tour.

They visited a deer operation, an intensive indoor robotic dairy operation and a mixed cropping and birdseed business, which was currently undertaking a dairy conversion.

They also visited North Otago dairy farmer Rogan Borrie’s four properties near Oamaru.

Borrie, a fifth-generation farmer, completed Rabobank’s Farm Managers Programme in 2007.

He said it was a rewarding experience to share the developments and technology introduced on-farm.

“We showed the tour our new computerised irrigation scheme with pivot and fixed grid sprinklers that we have recently installed in order to reduce labour time and energy and improve water efficiency,” he said . .


Politics part of community service for founding member

August 13, 2011

Community service, a desire to help people and loyalty were common factors which motivated the women who were celebrated at the opening of the National Party’s 75th annual conference.

One of those women was a founding member, the late Hilda Gardiner was a conservative with a social conscience.

The daughter of James and Jessie Patrick, she was born in August 1896 and grew up on farm on Taieri Plains. Her mother was a great role model and told Hilda ‘we are put on this earth to serve others’.

This was a guiding principle for Hilda though out her life and the major motivation for her political involvement.

Hilda was a stalwart of the local community, local organisations and political scene. She was very concerned about the welfare of young mothers and children not getting a good start . This led to her involvement in the Free
Kindergarten Association, Birthright, Plunket and IHC. She was also active in Women’s Division Federated Farmers.

Her life-long involvement in Red Cross started when driving during the flu epidemic in 1918. She was awarded the society’s highest honour and represented the organisation overseas.

Hilda was also awarded an MBE.

She was brought up on a farm with livestock, observed the seasons, the cycle of nature and cultivation of food and this planted the seeds which made her a conservationist. She was active in the Tree Planting Association, Beautifying Society, Soil Health Association and a founding member of the Compos Society. She was very aware of the need to tread lightly on the earth.

When the National Party was founded Hilda was living with her husband, Arthur and their seven children at Tokarahi in North Otago. She held office at branch, women’s section, electorate and Otago Southland divisional level, was a
member of the Dominion Council and served as Women’s vice president.

A high point of her involvement in National was when the party first came to power in 1949. She had been involved in the party from the start and had worked so hard for it, there was a real sense of achievement in the election
victory.

In A Pretty Piece of Driving, a book on Hilda’s life, her granddaughter Jan Bolwell wrote:

“1949. When our man Tom Hayman stood against Nordmeyer, I said, ‘Tom, if you win this seat for us, I’ll ride on a bicycle down Thames Street.’ When Tom won, I jumped on the back of a bike being ridden by George Elvidge, the
manager of Wright Stephenson, and sailed triumphantly down the main street of Oamaru. Everyone thought I’d had a few.

“Then when Tom died the party asked me to take his place.

” ‘Hilda,’ said Arthur, ‘if you become an MP I’ll divorce you.’ So that was that.”

Hilda threw herself into voluntary work instead.

Her party involvement necessitated many trips to Wellington where she loved discussing issues and policy. She was extraordinarily knowledgeable and didn’t just work off emotion. Her grandchildren would visit and find her
listening to parliament on the radio with a copy of Hansard under her arm.

Hilda was a woman of stature and presence with an astute political brain. She had huge admiration for Prime Minister Keith Holyoake who was a good friend. She enjoyed working with him and the men who served in cabinet.

The party was in power for so long there was a sense of mission. The government was able to not just take a short term view but develop and implement policy for the mid and longer term too.

“I loved those meetings at parliament. Keith and the other ministers would join us when they could get away from the House. Tom Shand, Ralph Hanan, Norm Shelton and Harry Lake. All good men. We would sit for hours discussing issues of the day  . . .

“Strong, loyal women in the National party were listened to, I can assure you of that! Keith always said, ‘an ounce of loyalty is worth a ton of cleverness’ . . .

“Politics is not about brainpower, It’s about teamwork and being in touch with ordinary people. I learned that from Keith and from old Bill Massey . . .

“He was the Prime Minister. A mate of my father-in-law, Willie Gardiner. Farmer Bill we called him. Great mountain of a man with his busy moustache, huge paunch and bellowing laugh. On his tours around the country Bill Massey often stayed at the Grange, the family farm at Papakaio. That’s how I got interested in politics, listening to these two men talk about the latest events around the country. This was in the early 1920s before the Reform and Liberal parties joined to create our national party. We still had the remnants of the old Liberal Party in North Otago and they were dead against Farmer Bill and his Reform party. There was a real split between the farmers and the townies in those days. I remember one night old Bill was to address a crowd in Ngapara, but there was widespread flooding in North Otago and all the rivers were overflowing. Wee Willie Gardiner – you know what a massive man he was – heaved the PM on to his back and staggered across the swollen Windsor stream. It’s a wonder they weren’t both drowned. In Ngapara the Liberals gave him hell, booing and jeering and completely disrupting the meeting. ‘Listen to the lions roar’, old Bill shouted, ‘I didn’t know you had a zoo in here’. There was dead silence after that. Had them eating our of the palm of his hand. I learned a few tricks from Massey, especially those rallies I organised at the National Party rooms in Oamaru.”

Hilda was also a formidable worker and fundraiser.

“In 1940, just after he was elected leader, Sid Holland called in for lunch at Island Cliff with his secretary Tom Wilkes and our local MP David Kidd. He urged us to come up with fundraising ideas. Our National party was only four years old and desperately in need of decent premises. A group of us National Party women in North Otago decided to run a restaurant. In the end we had a fully equipped kitchen and restaurant that could cater for over one hundred folk. It wasn’t fancy tucker, just wholesome, cheap, food. People
brought in fresh vegetables and home killed meat and we relied on a network of volunteers. Our restaurant was very popular with the local community and we managed to raise thirty five thousand pounds!

The National Party rooms also hosted large meetings. Hilda’s strength of character, strong will and sense of duty were exemplified the day she was speaking at one of these. She had got the news of the sudden death of one of her sons that morning but carried on with the meeting.

Hilda was a pragmatist who took the highs and lows in her stride, knowing it was the cycle of politics. However, the 1984 election was a low point, she was disturbed not so much by National’s loss as the nature of it.

“What a fiasco. I was furious. It wasn’t the defeat. It was the way we lost. Besides licking our wounds I never imagined that as a party, we would also be forced to hang our heads in shame. How could Rob do that to his loyal followers? And not being straight with the new Prime Minister. Fancy Mr Lange having to fly Bernie Galvin, the secretary of the Treasury, and Spencer Russell, the Governor of the Reserve Bank, up to Auckland to tell him the true state of the country’s finances. Disgraceful. Nothing left to do except pick up the blue flag and march on before communism devoured us all.”

All Hilda’s community involvement was very much part of her life and times.

It started in the days before the welfare state when people had a responsibility to take care of the community, particularly the vulnerable. She firmly believed it was what you did; you didn’t and couldn’t rely on the state to provide.

Her service to National was part of her service to the community. Hilda Gardiner, the conservative with a conscience, was involved in politics to help people.

A Pretty Piece of Driving by Jan Bolwell is published by Steele Roberts. Jan also does a one woman stage show about her grandmother.

P.S. National ministers Paula Bennett and Hekia Parata were interviewed by Patrick Gower on women’s role in politics.


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