Rural round-up

January 13, 2019

No rescue for Taratahi :

A rescue package for the Taratahi Agricultural Training Centre was rejected by the Government last year, which left the national training provider no option but to face liquidation.

The Farmers Weekly has been told the package consisted of cost savings, a restructured business and courses, the planned sale of the 518ha Mangarata farm in the Wairarapa, a $6 million working capital cash injection and moratorium on refunding over payments to the Tertiary Education Commission (TEC).

Last year the Government spent nearly $100m bailing out Unitec, Whitireia and Tai Poutini polytechnics. . .

The vegans are coming, so Kiwi farmers need to give us something to believe in – Daniel Eb:

Environmental limits, changing tastes and a redefined social licence are driving consumers away from animal proteins. In part two of a series on the rise of veganism, Daniel Eb looks at what New Zealand must do to get on board.

There is a sense of impending transformation ahead for agriculture in New Zealand. The world’s richest consumers – New Zealand’s target market – want products that speak to their identity. They are increasingly perceiving value in terms of experience, and are less willing to tolerate our production-first model. In short, they want something to believe in. In the second part of this series on veganism I outline a way forward, an opportunity to re-imagine our value as food producers and our impact on the world. . .

Postive start for wool sales – Alan Williams:

The calendar 2019 wool sales season in the South Island started brightly, with indications of business being written in China, and helped by lower volumes.

Crossbred prices remain at depressed levels and there are still issues to be faced, but the positive start was refreshing, with finer crossbred wools up to 6% dearer at Christchurch on Thursday, and strong wools up to 2% better, PGG Wrightson’s South Island sales manager Dave Burridge said.

The small volumes of new season’s lambs’ wool were keenly sought after, with prices well ahead.  . .

Meet the couple at No.1 State Highway, Far(thest) North – David Fisher:

At the point in the road where there is little left of State Highway 1, you’ll find Herb and Colleen Subritzky.

In the evenings they sit on the deck of their home, overlooking the road – New Zealand’s longest road stretching more than 2000km from Cape Reinga in the north to Bluff in the south – nursing cold beers and listening to birds filling the silence of the Far North.

All day, buses and cars race by their home to cover those final few kilometres to Cape Reinga. At 6pm, the main parking area shuts and the flow reverses, dwindles then stops. From then until morning, it must be one of the quietest stretches of road in the country. . . 

Eight vie for Otago/Southland FMG Young Farmer title – Sudesh Kissun:

Two former workmates at the iconic Mount Linton Station are set to clash in the FMG Young Farmer of the Year contest.

Jacob Mackie and Allen Gregory, who are both 25, will go head to head in the Otago/Southland regional final in Milton next month.

“I can’t wait. I really enjoy the challenge of competing. It pushes your boundaries and makes you work on your weaknesses,” said Allen. . . 

Farmer credits his dog with fighting off attacking steer – Kristin Edge:

Johnny Bell reckons his little dog, Jade, saved his life by fighting off a steer that bowled the veteran farmer and was attacking him on the ground.

The canine companion then ran along the road to get help for her wounded master who had been knocked unconscious. Bell’s front teeth had been smashed out, his right eye severely bruised as was his ribs and legs.

What was not immediately evident was the Northland farmer was suffering a brain bleed. . .


Peters vs The Listener

August 25, 2008

Winston Peters has penned a letter to the editor of The Listener in response to David Fisher’s story about New Zealand First Incorporated on which I blogged a couple of weeks ago.

In relation to the “curiouser & curiouser story (August 16), the name New Zealand First is held by an incorporated society set up 15 years ago to hold and protect the name. This society had no other purpose and could not possibly generate the intrigue Fisher mistakenly infers. He sent my office a list of questions, none of which referred to this matter.

Fisher responded:

Peters has previously confirmed that party officials handle comments on party matters and party structure. Peters says NZ First Incorporated was set up 15 years ago “to hold and portect the name” and has no other purpose. Following the story’s publication, Peters sent a press release asserting that “New Zealand First Incorporated was set up well before the political party”.

According to documents bearing his signature, filed with the Companies Office, he is not correct. those documents, dated August 1993, are the rules of incoproration for the society and state that NZ First Inc was set up “to assist and promote the objects of the political party known as NZ First launched on 18 July 1993”.

Also, the documents with the Companies Office make no reference to the society’s existance being purely for the preservation of the name. Instead, NZ First Inc’s filings with the Companies Office include the party’s rules and procedures for selecting the party list, for dealing with the electorate candidates, for electing officers of the party and for putting remits before its annual party convention.”

This is typical Peters, leaving more questions than answers and among those questions is: if NZ First Inc hasn’t received income and made payments, how has the party been operating and who was paying for it?


Questions on nil returns

August 13, 2008

What might you expect to show on a political party’s annual return to the Companies Office for the structure through which the party exists?

Some of the things I’d expect to see are membership, donations and fund raising coming in and rent or rates, wages, stationery, postage, advertising, power and GST going out.

But as Keeping Stock points out an article in this week’s Listener by David Fisher explains New Zealand First Incorporated has been filing nil returns for 15 years.

I read the whole story in the magazine which is not yet on line and was left wondering:

1) Does the party have another vehicle which does have income and expenditure?

2) If so who knows about it?

3) If not how are the party’s operations funded?

4) Do party officials know anything about the running of NZ First?

5) If not who does?


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