6 ideas to re-connect a generation

30/06/2013

Being unemployed at any age is undesirable but youth unemployment is even more of a problem.

Having a job and learning the generic skills that come with doing it properly even with an unskilled job help make young people more employable.

Going from school on to a benefit rather than into further education, training or a job, make young people less employable and the longer they’re not working the more difficult it is for them to get,a nd keep, a job.

Kevin Roberts observes that young people without jobs are at risk of becoming disconnected from society and he offers six ideas to help re-connect them:

  • Partner more schools with local businesses, trade academies, and universities
  • Run career days for every age from 11 up
  • Introduce entrepreneurial skills as a subject in primary schools
  • Create start-up hubs that provide free internet access and basic business amenities for young graduates starting out
  • Cities should run competitions that challenge youth to find solutions to civic problems
  • Sing together. Singing keeps your spirits up, elevates parts of you that don’t often get to rise up. And you could be a YouTube phenomenon.

Having a job doesn’t necessarily mean working for someone else.

The Fieldays provided an opportunity for a young entrepreneur to show age isn’t a barrier to innovation:

. . . 12-year-old Patrick Roskram of Matamata, made an enthusiastic pitch to the Innovation Den panel about his invention; the fencing tool Gudgeon Pro 4in1. Patrick’s passionate speech was recognised by Dr Ray Thompson, Chair of the Angel’s Association NZ, who awarded the $1000 Best Pitch Award to the young finalist saying it was a stand-out presentation. Patrick also won a marketing pack from Vodafone’s Darren Hopper who offered time with their creative agency in Auckland. However, the icing on the cake for the young inventor was a personal invitation from Sir William Gallagher for the 12-year-old to have an internship at Gallagher’s Research and Development department during his school holidays.

Sir William Gallagher joined a surprised Patrick on stage as he finished his presentation. Sir William congratulated Patrick on his pitch, giving him a triple A for enthusiasm.

“You’ve certainly got a solution for the New Zealand market and I can see an opportunity for it. There’s some homework to do but I’m certain you can come up with a product that can go into shops.”

Patrick later said it was all “pretty awesome” and it had always been a dream of his to speak to Sir William and that he had lots of other ideas up his sleeve. . . .

It would be a safe bet that someone with this sort of initiative and ability at that age won’t be troubled by unemployment.


Rural round-up

14/06/2013

The primary industry powerhouse:

Governments have tried over the years to steer attention away from New Zealand’s primary industries as being the powerhouse of the economy.

As examples, tourism has been accepted as a large earner of foreign exchange, and with a prime minister serving as tourism minister, the spending ploughed into promoting New Zealand as a destination has increased. Sir Peter Jackson and the Weta Workshops have for some time now been used as illustrations of what clever New Zealanders can achieve. And the phrase ”knowledge economy” has been bandied around for a generation as ministers of the Crown promote learning and technology as a way of breaking down the barriers of distance for New Zealand. . .

Cracker innovation entries at Fieldays:

Judges were overwhelmed by the high standard of entries in the Fieldays Innovation Competition at Fieldays yesterday.

 Darren Hopper, spokesperson for Vodafone, the major partner of the Fieldays Innovation Centre , says the competition is crucial to growing good ideas and gaining efficiency. New Zealand’s agricultural sector is the envy of the world and synonymous with Kiwi ingenuity, he says.

The Fieldays International Innovation Award recognises the best agri-business innovations being launched on the world stage. The award was presented at last night’s Fieldays Opening Cocktail Function. . .

MPI called into UK disease outbreak simulation:

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) has been called into a large scale United Kingdom animal disease outbreak exercise.

The UK authorities have asked MPI to advise on the availability of New Zealand vets, emergency managers and technicians to help manage the simulated outbreak.

The EXERCISE is testing the UK’s capacity to deal with a nationwide outbreak of classical swine fever. In the simulation, the outbreak has become so large that the supply of local animal health experts cannot cope alone and authorities have called on New Zealand for help.

New Zealand is party to a six-country (New Zealand, Australia, UK, Canada, Ireland and USA) Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to form an international animal health emergency reserve. In the event of a disease outbreak, vets and other animal health experts can be called in from participating countries. Under the MOU New Zealand vets helped out in the UK’s 2001 foot and mouth disease (FMD) outbreak. . .

A purple blister on the weather map is coming to get us – Milk Maid Marian:

It’s not a good sign when the local weather forecaster gets a spot on ABC Radio’s National news. Our forecast is so shocking that, yes, it made headlines today.

A massive chunk of Victoria is about to go underwater and, with it, a massive chunk of our farm. We’ve had an inch of rain in the last two hours and the prediction is for between 51 and 102mm tomorrow, followed by another 20 or 30mm over another couple of days.

I’m thankful for the undulations at the southern end of the farm. The cows will at least be safe. . .

Informed, proactive decision making during drought will pay off:

Cutting cattle numbers by a total of 59 percent and sheep by 30 percent by March during this season’s big dry may seem brutal, but it was a proactive decision based on sound figures, which has given Paul Dearden confidence heading into winter and lambing.

The Waipukurau sheep and beef farmer says regularly monitoring the situation and making timely decisions based on accurate figures was crucial in trying to minimise the cost of the drought to his farming business.

“Like others in drought regions, our challenge was to identify when to de-stock and by how many in order to preserve the health of our animals and look after the pasture we did have. More recently, we needed to get the timing of our Urea application right and make the most of the good rainfall. . .

New Wines to Taste At Hot Red Hawke’s Bay:

New releases, new wine labels and award-winners will be on offer at this year’s Hot Red Hawke’s Bay, the region’s flagship wine event being held next week.

Over 200 wine media, trade representatives and connoisseurs have snapped up tickets to the two events being held on June 18 at Auckland’s Viaduct Events Centre and on June 19 at Te Papa in Wellington.

Now in its tenth year, Hot Red originally only offered red wines for tasting but given the region’s increasing dominance with award-winning white wines, for the second year there will be a strong showing of Chardonnays amongst the 150-plus wine line-up. . .


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