NZ wins by 8 wickets

24/06/2021

I slept with the radio on, waking now and then to hear that Black Caps were edging towards winning the World Test Championship and woke up this morning to the good news:

Howzat?

A journey that started with Brendon McCullum and continued with Kane Williamson has ended with New Zealand on top of the world.

The Black Caps have won the inaugural World Test Championship, producing a stunning sixth and final day to beat India by eight wickets in Southampton.

With India starting the day at 64-2, leading by 32 runs, victory required a stunning bowling performance, and they produced just that – skittling India for 170, and chasing down their target of 139 with 7.1 overs to spare. . . 

We were in Spain when New Zealand played England for the title in that match when they batted first and were all out for 241.

We’d been wandering round the village listening to the commentary on the radio when we heard some English accents from a table in the plaza.

I asked if they were cricket fans, they said yes but couldn’t get a commentary. We offered to share ours and sat down almost as far away as we could get from Radio Sport and listened to the last few overs.

We were happier than our new friends when we finished 241/8 which we all thought meant we’d won, or at very least drawn.

But alas the rules stated the team with the most boundaries was the winner and that was England.

That makes last night’s win even sweeter.


NZ top cricket test team

06/01/2021

The Black Caps have had a very good series:

We could have listened to the commentary on Magic Talk but a whole lot of people who would have watched it on television didn’t/couldn’t because Spark won the TV rights.

It was a business decision by NZ Cricket, we might never know whether what they gained from that compensated for audience loss.


366 days of gratitude

26/03/2018

The Black Caps won the cricket test against England by an innings and 49 runs.

What’s more the team did it without cheating and I’m very grateful for that.


Who said cricket is boring?

28/02/2015

What a game:

Australia 151: New Zealand 152/9.

Phew!

 


302!

18/02/2014

Black Caps skipper Brendon McCullum is the first New Zealand batsman to score 300 runs in a test.

He got to 298, hit a four and in doing so broke Martin Crowe’s record of 299 runs.

That he was caught on the next ball doesn’t matter, but does indicate whatbit took to break the record.

It was a wonderful feat for him and his supporting partner Jimmy Neesham who scored his maiden century.

Keeping Stock has more statistics.


It’s a draw!

25/01/2014

Who said cricket was boring?

10.15pm – India draw to keep series alive

Ravindra Jadeja hits a single on the last ball to draw level with the Black Caps and keep the series alive with two matches left to play.

New Zealand had some bad luck in the final overs but India refused to lie down and fought back to achieve what seemed impossible.

Thrilling finish to a fantastic game. . .

Just wondering if any New Zealander thought it might have been cricket to bowl the last ball underarm?


Kiwi cricketer Dutch Player of Year

02/01/2012

Kiwi cricketer, Peter Borren, has won CricketEurope’s Dutch Player of the Year poll.

Borren, who was beaten into second place by Henk-Jan Mol in last year’s poll, had another outstanding season in 2011, captaining VRA to their second double of championship and Twenty20 Cup in consecutive years.

Although his preparation for the World Cup was disrupted by a nagging injury he produced several memorable innings, especially his 82-ball 84 in the final game against Ireland. Unable to bowl in the first three matches, he turned in a fine spell with the ball against India, and his captaincy under great pressure was inspirational on the field and dignified off it.

If the results in the World Cup were disappointing the same cannot be said of the CB40 League, where Borren led his side to five victories and a tie in their eleven completed matches. The captain contributed 268 runs, second only to Wesley Barresi, at an average of 29.77, and claimed 12 wickets at 28.00. His 37-ball 56 not out against Derbyshire at Derby and, even more outstanding, 33-ball 71 not out (including five fours and six sixes) against Kent in Rotterdam played a key part in those two wins.

He played for Canterbury and New Zealand under-19 teams before choosing to play for the Netherlands.

You can read more about his career here.


Final, final farewell to Carisbrook

06/08/2011

We were at what was supposed to be the final test at Carisbrook when the – All Blacks played Wales last year.

However, Christchurch’s earthquake mounted munted Jade Stadium which gave the ‘Brook a final, final test against Fiji last month.

Rfdunedin reminded me the final inter-provincial between southern rivals, Otago and Southland will be played there today and his memories of its past brought back some of mine.

My first visits were when I was a student, standing on the terrace.

It would have been a couple of decades before I went back in the early days of the Highlanders when it was stacked full of All Blacks – Taine Randell, Jeff Matheson, Tony Brown, Marc Ellis, Josh Kronfeld . . .

There were other rugby tests and some cricket matches too.

But the highlight was watching Otago win the NPC. I think that was John Leslie’s last game for Otago and he was given the ball for the last play of the game which was a kick for a penalty.

A stadium doesn’t make a team but here’s hoping the new Forsyth Barr one creates even more good memories.

For far more informed and detailed memories, Brent Edwards recorded his for the ODT last year.


May 1 in history

01/05/2010

On May 1: 

305  Diocletian and Maximian retired from the office of Roman Emperor. 

880 The Nea Ekklesia was inaugurated in Constantinople setting the model for all later cross-in-square Orthodox churches. 

1328  Wars of Scottish Independence ended: Treaty of Edinburgh-Northampton – the Kingdom of England recognised the Kingdom of Scotland as an independent state. 

Royal Coat of Arms of Scotland 

1576  Stefan Batory, the reigning Prince of Transylvania, married Anna Jagiellon and they became the co-rulers of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. 

 

1707 The Act of Union joined the Kingdom of England and Kingdom of Scotland to form the Kingdom of Great Britain. 

  

1751 The first cricket match was played in America. 

1753 Publication of Species Plantarum by Linnaeus, and the formal start date of plant taxonomy adopted by the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature. 

 

1759 Josiah Wedgwood founded the Wedgwood pottery company in Great Britain. 

  

1776 Establishment of the Illuminati in Ingolstadt (Upper Bavaria), by Jesuit-taught Adam Weishaupt

  

1778 American Revolution: The Battle of Crooked Billet began in Hatboro, Pennsylvania. 

Battle of Crooked Billet Monument.jpg 

1785  Kamehameha, the king of Hawaiʻi defeated Kalanikupule and established the Kingdom of Hawaiʻi. 

 

1786  Opening night of the opera The Marriage of Figaro by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in Vienna. 

 

1831 Emily Stowe, Canadian physician and suffragist, was born (d. 1903). 

  

1834  The British colonies abolished slavery

1840  The Penny Black, the first official adhesive postage stamp, was issued in the United Kingdom. 

Penny black.jpg 

1846  The few remaining Mormons left in Nauvoo, Illinois, formally dedicated the Nauvoo Temple

  

1848 The Fraternity of Phi Gamma Delta was founded at Jefferson College in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. 

1851 Queen Victoria opened the Great Exhibition in London. 

  

1852 Calamity Jane, American Wild West performer, was born (d. 1903). 

  

1852 The Philippine peso was introduced into circulation. 

1000-peso note one-peso coin

1863  American Civil War: The Battle of Chancellorsville began. 

Battle of Chancellorsville.png
 

1865 The Empire of Brazil, Argentina and Uruguay signed the Treaty of the Triple Alliance

 

1869 The Folies Bergère opened in Paris. 

  

1875 Alexandra Palace reopened after the 1873 fire burnt it down. 

  

1884  Proclamation of the demand for eight-hour workday in the United States. 

1884 Moses Fleetwood Walker became the first black person to play in a professional baseball game in the United States. 

 

1885 Ralph Stackpole, American sculptor, painter, was born  (d. 1973). 

 

1886 Rallies, that ended in the Haymarket affair, were held throughout the United States demanding the eight-hour work day. 

  

1893 The World’s Columbian Exposition opened in Chicago. 

  

1893 Richard Seddon became Premier of New Zealand. 

Richard Seddon becomes Premier 

  1894 Coxey’s Army, the first significant American protest march, arrived in Washington, D.C. 

1898  Spanish-American War: The Battle of Manila Bay – the United States Navy destroyed the Spanish Pacific fleet in the first battle of the war. 

  

1900 The Scofield mine disaster killed more than 200 men in Scofield, Utah. 

 

1901 The Pan-American Exposition opened in Buffalo, New York. 

  

1910 Dr. J. Allen Hynek, Astronomer/Astro-physicist. Noted UFO investigator, was born  (d. 1986). 

  

1915  The RMS Lusitania departed from New York City on her two hundred and second, and final, crossing of the North Atlantic. 

Lusitania
 

1925 The All-China Federation of Trade Unions was officially founded. 

ACFTU logo.jpg 

1926 New Zealand Railways magazine was launched. 

NZ Railways Magazine launched 

1927 The first cooked meals on a scheduled flight were introduced on an Imperial Airways flight from London to Paris. 

1927  The Union Labor Life Insurance Company was founded by the American Federation of Labor. 

1930 The dwarf planet Pluto was officially named.

Pluto-map-hs-2010-06-c180.jpg 

1931 The Empire State Building was dedicated in New York City.

Manhattan at Dusk by slonecker.jpg

1937  Una Stubbs, English actress, was born. 

TillDeathUsDo.jpg 

1939 Judy Collins, American folk singer, was born. 

 

1940 The 1940 Summer Olympics were cancelled owing to war. 

1941 – World War II: German forces launch a major attack on Tobruk

1945 World War II: A German newsreader officially announced that Adolf Hitler had “fallen at his command post in the Reich Chancellery fighting to the last breath against Bolshevism and for Germany”. 

1945  Yougoslav partisans freed Trieste

Yugoslav Partisans flag 1945.svg 

1945  Rita Coolidge, American singer, was born. 

 

1946  Joanna Lumley, English actress, was born. 

 

1946 Start of 3 year Pilbara strike of Indigenous Australians. 

1946 The Paris Peace Conference concluded that the islands of the Dodecanese should be returned to Greece by Italy. 

  

1947 Portella della Ginestra massacre against May Day celebrations in Sicily by the bandit and separatist leader Salvatore Giuliano; 11 people were killed and 33 wounded.

1948 The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (North Korea) was established, with Kim Il-sung as president.

 

1950  Guam was organized as a United States commonwealth.

 

1956  The polio vaccine developed by Jonas Salk was made available to the public. 

1956  A doctor in Japan reported an “epidemic of an unknown disease of the central nervous system”, marking the official discovery of Minamata disease.

1960 Formation of the western Indian states of Gujarat and Maharashtra.

1960  Cold War: U-2 incidentFrancis Gary Powers, in a Lockheed U-2 spyplane, iwa shot down over the Soviet Union, sparking a diplomatic crisis.

 

1961 The Prime Minister of Cuba, Fidel Castro, proclaimed Cuba a socialist nation and abolishes elections.

Five horizontal stripes: three blue and two white. A red equilateral triangle at the left of the flag, partly covering the stripes, with a white five pointed star in the centre of the triangle. A shield in front of a fasces crowned by the Phrygian Cap, all supported by an oak branch and a laurel wreath

 

1965 Battle of Dong-Yin, a naval conflict between ROC and PRC, took place. 

1970  Protests erupted in Seattle, Washington, following the announcement by U.S. President Richard Nixon that U.S. Forces in Vietnam would pursue enemy troops into Cambodia, a neutral country. 

1971 Amtrak (the National Railroad Passenger Corporation) was formed to take over U.S. passenger rail service.

 
Logo

 

1977 36 people were killed in Taksim Square, Istanbul, during the Labour Day celebrations. 

1978 Japan’s Naomi Uemura, travelling by dog sled, became the first person to reach the North Pole alone.

1982 The 1982 World’s Fair opened in Knoxville, Tennessee.

 

1982 Operation Black Buck: The Royal Air Force attacked the Argentine Air Force during Falklands War. 

 

1983 Greek composer Mikis Theodorakis was awarded the Lenin Peace Prize.

1987 Pope John Paul II beatified Edith Stein, a Jewish-born Carmelite nun who was gassed in the Nazi concentration camp at Auschwitz.

 

1989 Disney-MGM Studios opened at Walt Disney World near Orlando, Florida.

 

1990 The former Philippine Episcopal Church (supervised by the Episcopal Church of the United States of America) was granted full autonomy and raised to the states of an Autocephalous Anglican Province and renamed the Episcopal Church of the Philippines. 

Episcopalphils.jpg

1992 On the third day of the 1992 Los Angeles riots, African-American activist, criminal, and victim of police beating Rodney King appeared in public before television news cameras to appeal for calm and plead for peace, asking, “People, I just want to say, you know, can we all get along?”. 

1994  Three-time Formula One world champion Ayrton Senna was killed in an accident during the San Marino Grand Prix at Imola.

 

1995 Croatian forces launch Operation Flash during the Croatian War of Independence. 

1997  Tasmania became the last state in Australia to decriminalize homosexuality. 

2001 Philippine President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo declared the existence of “a state of rebellion”, hours after thousands of supporters of her arrested predecessor, Joseph Estrada, stormed towards the presidential palace at the height of the EDSA III rebellion.

 

2003 2003 invasion of Iraq: In the “Mission Accomplished” speech, on board the USS Abraham Lincoln (off the coast of California), U.S. President George W. Bush declaref that “major combat operations in Iraq have ended”. 

  

2004 Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia, and Slovenia joined the European Union, celebrated at the residence of the Irish President in Dublin.

Circle of 12 gold stars on a blue background.

2006  The Puerto Rican government closed the Department of Education and 42 other government agencies owing to to significant shortages in cash flow. 

2007  the Los Angeles May Day mêlée occured, in which the Los Angeles Police Department’s response to a May Day pro-immigration rally become a matter of controversy. 

2008 The London Agreement on translation of European patents, concluded in 2000, entered into force in 14 of the 34 Contracting States to the European Patent Convention

2009 Same-sex marriage was legalized in Sweden. 

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


March 28 in history

28/03/2010

On March 28:

37  Roman Emperor Caligula accepted the titles of the Principate, entitled to him by the Senate.

 

193 – Roman Emperor Pertinax was assassinated by Praetorian Guards, who then soldthe throne in an auction to Didius Julianus.

Pertinax.jpgDidiusJulianus.jpg

364 Roman Emperor Valentinian I appointed his brother Flavius Valens co-emperor.

 

845 Paris was sacked by Viking raiders, probably under Ragnar Lodbrok, who collected a huge ransom in exchange for leaving.

 

1472 Fra Bartolommeo, Italian artist, was born.

1515 Saint Teresa of Avila, Spanish Carmelite nun, was born.
1750 Francisco de Miranda, Venezuelan revolutionary, was born.
Francisco de Miranda by Tovar y Tovar.jpg
1760 Thomas Clarkson, British abolitionist, was born.

1795 Partitions of Poland: The Duchy of Courland, a northern fief of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, ceased to exist and became part of Imperial Russia.

1802 Heinrich Wilhelm Matthäus Olbers discovered 2 Pallas, the second asteroid known to man.

PallasHST2007.jpg 

1809 Peninsular War: France defeated Spain in the Battle of Medelin.

1834 The United States Senate censuresd President Andrew Jackson for his actions in de-funding the Second Bank of the United States.

1860 First Taranaki War: The Battle of Waireka started.

 

1862 Battle of Glorieta Pass – Union forces stopped the Confederate invasion of New Mexico territory.

The-Battle-of-Glorieta-Pass.jpg

1871 The Paris Commune was formally establised.

 

1889 The Yngsjö murder  took place in Sweden – Anna Månsdotter and her son were arrested.

1910 Henri Fabre was the first person to fly a seaplane, the Fabre Hydravion, after taking off from a water runway near Martigues, France.

1920 Palm Sunday tornado outbreak in the Great Lakes region and Deep South states.

1921 Dirk Bogarde, English actor, was born.

1930 Constantinople and Angora changed their names to Istanbul and Ankara.

1935 Michael Parkinson, English broadcaster, was born.

Parkinson (ITV) title card.jpg

1936 Mario Vargas Llosa, Peruvian author and politician, was born.

1939 Spanish Civil War: Generalissimo Francisco Franco conquered Madrid.

1941 Battle of Cape Matapan –  British Admiral Andrew Browne Cunningham led the Royal Navy in the destruction of three major Italian heavy cruisers and two destroyers.

 

1942 Neil Kinnock, British politician, was born.

 

1946 The United States State Department released the Acheson-Lilienthal Report, outlining a plan for the international control of nuclear power.

1946 Alejandro Toledo, former President of Peru, was born,

 1948 John Evan, British musician (Jethro Tull), was born.

1948 – Milan Williams, American musician (The Commodores) was born.

1948 – Matthew Corbett, English retired actor, was born.

1955  New Zealand cricket experienced its darkest day, when its 11 batsman could muster only 26 runs against England at Eden Park.

NZ cricketers skittled for 26

1968 Brazilian high school student Edson Luís de Lima Souto was shot by the police in a protest for cheaper meals at a restaurant for low-income students.

1969 Greek poet and Nobel Prize laureate Giorgos Seferis made a statement on the BBC World Service opposing the junta in Greece.

1969 – The McGill français movement protest –  the second largest protest in Montreal’s history with 10,000 trade unionists, leftist activists, CEGEP some McGill students at McGill’s Roddick Gates.

1978 The US Supreme Court handed down a 5-3 decision in Stump v. Sparkman, 435 U.S. 349, a controversial case involving involuntary sterilization and judicial immunity.

1979 Operators failed to recognise that a relief valve was stuck open in the primary coolant system of Three Mile Island’s Unit 2 nuclear reactor following an unexpected shutdown. As a result, enough coolant drained out of the system to allow the core to overheat and partially melt down.

The Three Mile Island NPP on Three Mile Island, circa 1979

1979 – The British House of Commons passed a vote of no confidence against James Callaghan’s government, precipitating a general election.

 

1983 The Australia-New Zealand Closer Economic Relations Trade Agreement (ANZCERTA), better known as CER, was signed. It was New Zealand’s first comprehensive bilateral trade agreement – and one of the first agreements of this kind in the world.

Signing of CER strengthens Tasman trade ties

 1990 President George H. W. Bush posthumously awarded Jesse Owens the Congressional Gold Medal.

Jesse Owens1.jpg

1994  Zulus and African National Congress supporters battled in central Johannesburg, resulting in 18 deaths.

1994  12-year-old schoolgirl Nikki Conroy was stabbed to death at Hall Garth School in Middlesbrough after a man walked into her maths classroom and attacked pupils with a knife.

2000 A Murray County, Georgia, school bus was hit by a CSX freight train which killed three children.

2003  In a “friendly fire” incident, two A-10 Thunderbolt II attack aircraft from the Idaho Air National Guard’s 190th Fighter Squadron attacked British tanks participating in the  invasion of Iraq, killing British soldier Matty Hull.

MattyHull.jpg

2005  The 2005 Sumatran earthquake rocked Indonesia, and at magnitude 8.7 was the second strongest earthquake since 1965.

2006 At least 1 million union members, students and unemployed took to the streets in France in protest at the government’s proposed First Employment Contract law.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


February 15 in history

15/02/2010

On February 15:

509 Khosrau II is crowned king of Persia

 
KosrauIIGoldCoin.JPG

1564 Galileo Galilei, Italian astronomer and physicist, was born.

1637Ferdinand III becomes Holy Roman Emperor.

 1804Serbian revolution started.

1805Harmony Society was officially formed.

 The Harmony Society church in Old Economy Village, Pennsylvania.

1812 Charles Lewis Tiffany, American jeweller, was born.

1820 Susan B. Anthony, American suffragist, was born.

 

1835 – The first constitutional law in modern Serbia was adopted.

1852Great Ormond St Hospital for Sick Children, London, admitted its first patient.

 

1874 Sir Ernest Shackleton, Irish Antarctic explorer, was born.

1877  Louis Renault, French automobile executive, was born.

 

1879 American President Rutherford B. Hayes signed a bill allowing female attorneys to argue cases before the Supreme Court of the United States.

1882 The first shipment of frozen meat left New Zealand.

First shipment of frozen meat leaves NZ

1891 AIK was founded at Biblioteksgatan 8 in Stockholm by Isidor Behrens.

Aik.png

1898 – Spanish-American War: The USS Maine exploded and sank in Havana harbour, killing more than 260.

USS "Maine" entering Havana Harbor on 25 January 1898, where the ship would explode three weeks later

1906 – The British Labour Party was formed.

Labour logo
   

1909 Miep Gies, Dutch biographer of Anne Frank, was born.

 

1909 The Flores Theatre fire in Acapulco, 250 died.

1942  The Fall of Singapore. Following an assault by Japanese forces, British General Arthur Percival surrendered. About 80,000 Indian, United Kingdom and Australian soldiers become prisoners of war, the largest surrender of British-led military personnel in history. The Sook Ching massacre began.

Singaporesurrender.jpgLt Gen. Arthur Percival, led by a Japanese officer, walks under a flag of truce to negotiate the capitulation of Allied forces in Singapore, on 15 February 1942.

1944 The assault on Monte Cassino, started.

Battle of Monte CassinoRuins of Cassino town after the battle

1944 Mick Avory, British drummer (The Kinks), was born.

1945  – John Helliwell, British musician (Supertramp), was born.

 

1947 David Brown, American musician (Santana), was born.

1950 – The Soviet Union and the People’s Republic of China signed a mutual defense treaty.

1951 Jane Seymour, British actress, was born.

1952King George VI was buried in St. George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle.

1959 Ali Campbell, British singer and songwriter (UB40), was born.

1960 Mikey Craig, British musician (Culture Club), was born.

1961Sabena Flight 548 crashed in Belgium, killing 73, with the entire United States Figure Skating team, several coaches and family.

1965 – A new red-and-white mapleleaf design was adopted as the flag of Canada, replacing the old Canadian Red Ensign banner.

 

1970 – A Dominican DC-9 crashes into the sea during takeoff from Santo Domingo, killing 102.

1971Decimalisation of British coinage was completed on Decimal Day.

1972 – Sound recordings were granted U.. federal copyright protection for the first time.

1976 – The 1976 Constitution of Cuba was adopted by the national referendum.

1978 New Zealand beat England in a cricket test for the first time.

New Zealand beats England in a cricket test for the first time

1980 Television One and Television Two (formerly South Pacific Television) under the newly formed Television New Zealand went to air for the first time.

1982 The drilling rig Ocean Ranger sank during a storm off the coast of Newfoundland, killing 84 rig workers.

 

1989 Soviet Union invasion of Afghanistan: The Soviet Union officially announced that all of its troops have left Afghanistan.

1991 The Visegrád Agreement, establishing cooperation to move toward free-market systems, was signed by the leaders of Czechoslovakia, Hungary and Poland.

2001 First draft of the complete Human Genome is published in Nature.

2003 Protests against the Iraq war occurred in over 600 cities worldwide. It is estimated that between 8 million to 30 million people took part, making this the largest peace demonstration in the history of the world.

 StWC poster advertising the demonstration

2005YouTube, was launched in the United States.

YouTube logo.svg

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


Sports talk

27/11/2009

* Adam Smith corrected me last week for calling the football match between Bahrain and New Zealand a test. Can someone enlighten me as to when a match between two national teams is a test and when it isn’t?

* 99 then out – how frustrating for Daniel Vettori.


Sports Talk

13/11/2009

*The Breakers beat Backetball league leaders the Wildcats, last night.

* The next Americas Cup is probably going to be sailed off Valencia again.

* The Black Caps are playing Pakistan in 20-20 cricket

* Rugby for girls and boys this weekend:

The Black Ferns have the first of two tests against England on Sunday and the All Blacks are in Milan, lucky them, to play Italy.


Ouch!

26/11/2008

haka


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