Rural round-up

November 8, 2017

Tackling water resource conservation with modern agriculture – Craige Mackenzie:

As I sat in a board room in Minneapolis, I used a break in my meeting to check the moisture of the soil on my farm in New Zealand.   I didn’t walk into a field and dig a hole or stick a meter into the dirt. Instead, I pulled out my phone, looked at its screen, and saw what my sensors were saying.

Fellow Global Farmer Network board member V Ravichandran was checking his phone as well.  Ravi was looking at photos of his cotton crop that had just been sent to him from his farm in Tamil Nadu India. Ravi checked the photos and sent a reply e-mail to India with his observation and actions required.

This is what modern agriculture looks like: It’s global, it’s high-tech, and it’s all about sustainable conservation. . .

Diversifying in the Catlins – Sally Rae:

Enterprising Catlins farmers Carey and Tracey Hancox have diversified their busy farming operation near Owaka with an accommodation venture and an on-farm butchery, processing their homegrown lamb. Agribusiness reporter Sally Rae pays them a visit.

Carey and Tracey Hancox make the most of opportunities as they arise.

The couple have a simple philosophy when it comes to their business — “no-one gets anywhere without hard work”.

“It’s just a fact of life, really. It’s not easy. People look happy once they’re successful but I think it’s reflected in how hard they have to work.

“That little bit of happiness is the payment for the stress and the worry. It balances itself out,” Mr Hancox explains. . . 

One enterprising rural woman – Yvonne O’Hara:

When Debra Cruikshank left school, she was not sure what she wanted to do.

She grew up on a sheep and beef farm in the Catlins and at the very least knew she wanted to do physical work.

She thought she might try art school.

Now, at 37, she has her own vineyard and winery and a successful business, DC Wines, that is growing each year.

After leaving school and the farm she chose to spend a year in Central Otago. . . 

New confidence and culture at Westland Milk Products:

New ways of working at board and management levels have led to a change of culture at Westland Milk Products, with a brighter outlook and growing shareholder confidence in the company, said Chairman Pete Morrison in the company’s 2017 Annual Report released today.

Commenting on the 2016-17 season, Morrison said extensive new thinking had come into the company with new management, a revised board structure and better ways of working.

“The 2016-17 financial year for Westland Milk Products was characterised by challenge and change,” Morrison said. “We began the 2016-17 year under considerable financial pressure. Shareholders, quite rightly, were demanding answers and calling for both the board and management to do much better and reverse the loss making result of the year before.” . . 

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When you lied on your CV abut having previous sheepdog experience – NZ Farming

Reda eyes Australia to secure supply – Annabelle Cleeland:

AN exclusive long-term contract has whet the appetite of a European fabric maker who is appealing to the very best Australian superfine woolgrowers to partner with them to help feed the growing demand for luxury and active wear fabrics.

There are only 20 members in the current Reda Future Project, set-up by 152 year-old Italian fabric maker Reda, who meet the quality standards of set by the country’s largest integrity scheme, SustainaWOOL. 

Last year, Reda chief operating officer Francesco Botto Poala said the company acquired 1500 bales of 15.8 to 19.2 micron wool from this exclusive group, and they are hungry for more. . . 

 

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Rural round-up

July 13, 2017

Oritain, GE Healthcare form serum testing partnership – Sally Rae:

Oritain has partnered with global medical technology giant GE Healthcare to run a test-based traceability programme to authenticate country of origin of foetal bovine serum (FBS), used in human and animal health vaccines.

Since its establishment in 2008, the Mosgiel-based company has been a global leader in using forensic science to determine product provenance.

Operations director Dr Sam Lind described the partnership as ”very significant”, not only cementing the work the company was doing within that industry, but also the opportunity to work with such a global company. . .

Productivity and quality pay off for Matarae – Sally Rae:

At Matarae Station, Willie and Emily Jones have a strong focus on development and production.

The couple, with young sons Archie and Digby, lease the 5500ha Strath Taieri property from Mr Jones’ parents, Ron and Juliet, but own the stock.

They said they were running both merino and Romney sheep under ‘‘pretty extreme’’ conditions that could range from a metre of snow to very wet, or as dry as the typical Central Otago climate.

The property was running about 5700 merino ewes, 3800 Romney ewes, 3500 merino hoggets and 1800 Romney and halfbred hoggets, plus lambs, mixed-age rams and about 200 breeding cows. . .

Precision farming the new reality

Craige MacKenzie has seen a lot of technological change since 1978, when he started farming the property he grew up on near Methven.

“The changes haven’t just been in the tools we can use, but also in the industry-wide focus on precision farming, which is all about using IT to ensure crops and soil receive exactly what they need for optimum health and productivity. We’ve tried to take it to a new level.”

Craige and his wife Roz turned a traditional mixed cropping farm into a dairy farm and a specialised seed production operation in 1987.

He has won numerous awards for outstanding farming practice, including: . .

The 25 most innovative at-tech startups – Maggie McGrath and Chloe Sorvino:

When our nation was founded 241 years ago, farming was the economy’s primary driver. By 1870, nearly half of the employed population held jobs in agriculture. Today, it’s a $3 trillion industry – but only 2% of Americans hold a farm-oriented job.

This is, in many ways, thanks to technology. Tractors and other automation advances in the 20th century let large farms shift management to only a handful of people. But this, paradoxically, has also slowed things down in the 21st. With only a few people working every farm, there’s not a lot of time – or incentive – to innovate.

“You only get 40 attempts at farming. From your 20’s to your 60’s, you get 40 seasons,” says Duncan Logan, the founder and CEO of RocketSpace, a tech accelerator company. “In tech, you get 40 attempts in a week.” . . 

Fonterra Announces General Manager, Māori Strategy – Tiaki Hunia:

Fonterra today announced the appointment of Tiaki Hunia to the role of General Manager, Māori Strategy/Pouhere Māori.

As Pouhere Māori, Tiaki will play a vital role in continuing to progress our strategic Māori commitments and strengthen Fonterra’s bicultural capability. He will work across the business, to lead, build and implement our vision of a strong partnership with Māori, growing prosperous, healthy and sustainable communities together. . .

Tractor and machinery industry calls for larger fines for intentional biosecurity breaches:

The Tractor and Machinery Association (TAMA) is praising the Ministry of Primary Industry for finding a contaminated combine harvester imported from the UK but says fines must be a deterrent for intentional biosecurity breaches.

Last week Christchurch company Gateway Cargo Systems Ltd was fined $3,000 by the Ministry of Primary Industries after it declared a contaminated combine harvester imported from the United Kingdom was brand new. An inspection by MPI at the border found it had been used and was heavily contaminated with more than 700 litres of soil and farm waste in the header unit. MPI said it could have caused “incalculable damage” to New Zealand’s environment. . .

 


Rural round-up

September 27, 2016

Drones to aid farm work :

Rab Heath grew up on a farm so he knows that grass equals money.

However, keeping an eye on your pasture takes time, and a huge amount of physical effort when checking soil conditions in every paddock.

Rab’s worked out a way to do this remotely, using drones. . . 

Canterbury farmers face bleak irrigation season – Thomas Mead:

Canterbury farmers face a tough spring with several key irrigation rivers already on restriction after a third straight year of low groundwater levels, with some wells, streams and springs to dry up.

Poor rainfall has left alpine rivers well below their long-term averages, with the Ahuriri River in South Canterbury already on a full restriction preventing all kinds of irrigation. Other rivers, including the Rakaia, Waimakariri, Hurunui, and Rangitata, are partially restricted.

Environment Canterbury (ECAN) surface water science manager Tim Davie says the restrictions are designed to protect ecosystems and stream-life. . . 

Technology set to play big part in NZ agriculture:

Ultimately, for New Zealand to diversify its export base, technology will play a critical role in improving value-add in agricultural exports, a leading New Zealand agri-tech expert says.

Craige Mackenzie, chair of Precision Agriculture Association of New Zealand (PAANZ), says precision agriculture has a lot to offer the bright future of the second biggest New Zealand industry sector.

“There is growing interest in the benefits of precision agriculture for environmental and financial viability of our New Zealand farms but we have a challenge ahead to get greater engagement with more farmers and companies in this sector. . . 

NZ Farming Systems Uruguay to cut ties with NZ, posts biggest loss since Olam took control – Jonathan Underhill:

(BusinessDesk) – NZ Farming Systems Uruguay, set up by New Zealand investors in 2006, is to cut ties with the country after delivering its biggest-ever loss to owner Olam International of Singapore.

Olam has retained a New Zealand registration for the South American subsidiary since buying out minority shareholders and delisting it from the NZX in late 2012, with its registered office care of law firm Buddle Findlay in Auckland. But the latest annual report of Farming Systems says the group “has the intention to deregister the parent company from the NZ Companies Office and migrate to Uruguay.”

Farming Systems appears to have been hard hit by the downturn in global prices of dairy products, with its net loss widening to US$74.5 million in the year ended June 30, from US$69.5 million a year earlier. Sales fell 34 percent to US$48.9 million. . . 

NZ dairy farm prices show sharp rise, REINZ figures show – Edwin Mitson:

(BusinessDesk) – The median price per hectare for a New Zealand dairy farm sales has increased by more than 50 percent on a year ago, Real Estate Institute of New Zealand figures show.

In the three months to the end of August 2016, the median sales price per hectare was $40,469, with 14 properties sold. In the same period a year earlier, the median price was $26,906, with 21 properties sold, a rise of 50.4 percent.

The figures cover the winter period, with REINZ noting that the low level of sales can distort statistics. The median size of a dairy farm sold was 100 hectares. . . 

Venison sales set to soar this spring as Kiwis become more adventurous and health conscious in the kitchen:

Duncan Venison has reported a surge in demand from consumers and professional chefs in the run up to spring and summer, indicating that Kiwis are recognising the health and taste benefits, are starting to see it as a year-round option, and are also becoming more adventurous with how they cook it.

The company is selling considerable quantities of venison to restaurants and home cooks per week, with no sign of sales slowing down as the warmer weather approaches. This includes the “Bistro Fillet from Pāmu Farms,” a tender, pan ready cut that was developed earlier this year, and is now on the menu at restaurants such as The Sugar Club, Sails Restaurant, The French Café, Paris Butter, and Clooney.

Since the 1st July launch, sales of Bistro Fillet have exceeded budgeted volumes by over 50%, with a number of restaurants still to change over to their spring menu. . . 

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Because of their connection to the land, farmers do more to protect and preserve our environment than almost anyone else. They are some of the best environmentalists around  – Ike Skelton.


Rural round-up

August 12, 2016

Kiwi world leader in precision farming – Nigel Malthus:

Mid-Canterbury farmer and businessman Craige Mackenzie was recently named the international Precision Farmer of the Year for 2016.

He is travelling to St Louis, Missouri, in early August to receive the award from the US-based PrecisionAg Institute. Nigel Malthus caught up with him before he left.

The award recognises “outstanding people, programmes and organisations making a difference in the precision ag industry”. It is a high honour for a man who was first invited to present a paper at an international conference in 2008 – but who did not then consider himself a precision farmer. . . 

$34-$35 Million FY16 reported earnings forecast for Synlait:

Synlait Milk’s reported net profit after tax (NPAT) for FY16 is forecast to be in the range of $34 – $35 million.

Underlying NPAT for FY16 is forecast to be in the range of $32 – $33 million.

Earnings guidance for the financial year ending 31 July 2016 (FY16) has been provided to clarify market expectations around FY16 performance.

“Our IPO growth projects added the capability and capacity to execute our strategy of making more from milk,” said Graeme Milne, Chairman. . . 

Collaborative group to improve nature protection:

A new collaborative group involving environmental and landowner organisations has come together to improve national policy on protecting nature on private land, Environment Minister Nick Smith announced today at the Environmental Defence Society’s ‘Wild Places’ conference in Auckland.

“New Zealand is globally recognised as a hotspot environmentally for the loss of unique species. One of the most challenging issues for councils and communities is improving the protection of our native species on private land while respecting the reasonable rights of owners to use their land for farming, forestry and other economic activities. This initiative is about bringing environmental groups and landowners together to develop clearer national policy on protecting the plants and animals that make New Zealand special.” . . 

Feds welcome biodiversity forum:

Federated Farmers welcomes the new national biodiversity forum announced by Minister Nick Smith at the Environmental Defence Society conference today.

Federated Farmers spokesperson for biodiversity Chris Allen says we now have the opportunity to come to a common understanding of the pressures and priorities for biodiversity, on land and in water.

“From here we chart a way forward. Part of this will be agreeing on a national policy statement. . . 

Threatened wildlife the winner if National Policy Statement on Biodiversity succeeds:

Forest & Bird is cautiously optimistic that the development of a National Policy Statement on Indigenous Biodiversity will help New Zealand’s struggling native wildlife, and streamline the process of protecting the environment.

Minister for the Environment Nick Smith announced today that core stakeholders have been invited to meet over the next 18 months and collaboratively work on a National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity.

A National Policy Statement (NPS) is a statutory document that guides and directs the contents of regional and district plans. All regional and district plans must give effect to the policy. . . 

Entries open for the 2016 Rural Women New Zealand Journalism Award:

Rural Women New Zealand is offering the Journalism Award in a partnership with the New Zealand Guild of Agricultural Journalists and Communicators.

The Award recognises the important contribution women make in the rural community, either through their role in the farming sector or to the general rural environment.

The Award encourages journalists to report on the achievements of women living and working in rural communities. The award recipient will demonstrate excellent understanding of issues and effectively communicate women’s responses to farming, family and business challenges, in a way which inspires and informs the audience. . . 

Changes to kiwifruit regulations:

The Government is updating kiwifruit regulations to ensure the industry is best structured for future growth, says Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy.

“New amendments to the Kiwifruit Export Regulations will allow Zespri shareholders to consider setting rules around maximum shareholding and eligibility for dividend payments. 

“This will give Zespri more options for managing its shareholding available to any other company operating under the Companies Act, and will ensure that the interests of all shareholders are recognised in any decision affecting them. . . 

Zespri welcomes changes to Kiwifruit Export Regulations:

Zespri welcomes the Government’s announcement that Cabinet has approved amendments to the Kiwifruit Export Regulations.

Zespri Chairman Peter McBride explains these regulatory changes represent the first major review of the regulations since they were put in place 17 years ago.

“The Kiwifruit Regulations have served the industry very well and extensive industry consultation showed more than 97 percent of growers support the industry structure, with minor changes identified to position the industry for the strong growth ahead. . . 

NZKGI welcomes amendments to Kiwifruit Export Regulations:

New Zealand Kiwifruit Growers Inc. (NZKGI) welcomes today’s announcement by the Government to approve amendments to the Kiwifruit Export Regulations.

These changes will ensure a regulatory structure that supports the sustainable, long-term growth of the New Zealand kiwifruit industry into the future.

The announcement today reflects considerable effort and investment by growers into ensuring the industry has the foundations to sustain its future in good and adverse times. . . 

Pahiatua Farmers Enjoy Participating In Ballance Farm Environment Awards:

Wairarapa sheep and beef farmers Tim and Nicola Hewitt are proud of the environmental work on their family’s 724ha (640ha effective) property south of Pahiatua. While they were initially reluctant to enter the Horizons Ballance Farm Environment Awards, they are glad they finally gave it a go.

“We didn’t want to be seen as blowing our own trumpet,” says Tim.

“But ultimately I think farmers have a responsibility to our industry to show that we are trying to do a good job when it comes to the environment.” . . 

New agri-food research centre in Palmerston North:

Science and Innovation Minister Steven Joyce has today announced that AgResearch and Massey University will jointly build New Zealand’s largest agri-food research centre in the Food HQ Precinct on the Massey University campus in Palmerston North.

As part of AgResearch’s Future Footprint Programme, AgResearch and Massey University are investing $39 million in the Food Science Research Centre and the design for the new buildings is well underway.

“The research conducted at the Centre will span the agriculture sector from farm to consumer, with a focus on dairy and red meat research,” Mr Joyce says. . . 

Association backs ‘thorough’ maunka honey verification – Alexa Cook:

The Unique Manuka Factor Honey Association says it can now classify what is genuine manuka honey, which it believes is a world first.

John Rawcliffe, from UMF Honey Association, said clarification around what constituted genuine manuka honey would help protect the brand and identify legitimate honey.

“Everyone who puts the word ‘manuka’ on a bottle is required to ensure that it is, so from any export honey the requirement is to show that you are labelling correctly that it is manuka.

“There have been question marks on how to go about it, and today under the UMF quality mark at least we can say ‘this is manuka’.” . . 

Rodent eradication lies in directed vitamin dose:

Rats die of a heart attack within 48 hours of being sprayed with a new chemical formulation invented by a New Zealand – United Kingdom joint venture.

The formula includes Cholecalciferol, better known as vitamin D3 and used as a health supplement in humans.

But Peter Signal, a director of New Zealand company Advanced Animal Technologies (AAT), says it’s the combination of the chemical formula with a specially designed delivery system, called PiedPiper, that has been shown to deliver outstanding results in trials in the UK, Europe and Kenya. . . 

 


Rural round-up

April 14, 2015

That is indeed a beautiful sound – Gravedodger:

Since around 0645 we have had the sound of rain on the roof,  steady and after two hours, around 13mm.

Here in Akaroa we were not as desperate as many pockets  around North Canterbury, a friend from Cheviot next door to where we spent three years in the mid 60s, is saying it is so parched there is not even any green in gully floors where there is normally some hope of a lunch for a rabbit.

Another comment in Farmers Weekly said their bit of unirrigated country has moved from brown to white. . .

Uneven rules costly – Neal Wallace:

Steps to control agricultural nutrient discharge could add 10c a litre to the cost of producing milk and impose wide-ranging restrictions on land management.

But there is little uniformity in regional council rules.

Most of the county’s 16 regional authorities are still to complete their regional plans but early indications are that each council has its own approach.

Rabobank sustainable farm systems manager Blake Holgate has been following the development and release of environmental regulations and said even neighbouring regional councils such as Otago and Southland have differing rules, creating uncertainty for owners of multiple properties and unknown costs. . .

Heartland Forum shaping up as South Island farming event of the year:

A speakers’ lineup of the who’s who in the primary sector makes this month’s ‘The Future of Heartland Forum’ near Cheviot in North Canterbury, a must attend.

A farmer discussion in Cheviot late last year about the spread of Chilean Needlegrass has since grown into staging a premier forum on the future of agriculture industries in New Zealand.

The event will be held at Te Mania Angus Stud, Conway Flat, Friday, April 17.

Other than Government speakers, the lineup includes; Dame Margaret Bazley from Environment Canterbury, Winton Dalley the Hurunui Mayor, Peter Townsend the Chief Executive of the Canterbury Employers Chamber of Commerce, Craige and Roz Mackenzie and Sam and Mark Zino, award winning farmers, Nicole Masters of the New Zealand Biological Farmers Association and Dr William Rolleston the National President of Federated Farmers New Zealand. . .

 Robotic milking can revive kids’ interest:

Robotic milking is coming of age in New Zealand and interest has surged in the last six months, DeLaval’s Grant Vickers says.

“I think it’s because a number of installations in New Zealand are working well,” he told Dairy News. “The perception of risk has probably lessened.”

The current inquiries, for robotics and barns, are from all sizes of farms and will result in installations in the North and South Island. 

Vickers spoke about robotic milking during a Dairy Women’s Network field trip to a 600-cow wintering barn as part of the organisation’s ‘Entering Tomorrow’s World’ conference. . .

What’s behind the longevity of Country Calendar? – Julian O’Brien:

Soon after I started producing Country Calendar, we had a minor crisis.

We thought we’d found a simple and elegant way to make new opening titles – but it quickly turned into a nightmare. 

We needed footage of people involved in typical rural activities, but to integrate the shots into our titles, they had to be shot against a neutral background – ideally a green-screen set up in a studio. 

Sheep in a studio? Achievable, but someone needs to be ready with a broom afterwards.

New Zealand’s top shearers in a studio? Impossible, if you want to keep the feel of a shearing competition – but we desperately wanted the shot.

As we pondered this, we had a crew shooting part of a story at the Taumarunui Shears – but there was no neutral background at the event to do a titles shot. . .

NZPork Annual Report 2014:

The NZPork Annual Report 2014, released today, reflects on the importance of the New Zealand consumer to the future of its business.

NZPork Chairman Ian Carter points out that it’s important to remember that our consumer is our neighbour and that we are touch with what consumers want and believe.

“We need to provoke interest in our product and our industry. We need to invoke confidence in our production standards and systems. And we need to evoke desire for our product,” said Ian Carter.

The report states the industry recognises that little is understood about pig farming in general amongst many New Zealanders, particularly the requirements of caring for its animals. In light of this, it is taking steps to be more transparent and advocate confidence to its consumers via its production systems and standards. . .

 Silage smells and what they mean – Ian Williams:

I grew up in town and one of my distinct memories of summer and autumn when we went to visit our farming friends was the smell of silage. 

As a kid, silage always seemed to stink and it is a smell which has been imprinted on my brain.

Now I work with the stuff. I even have a personalised number plate with the word SILAGE on it! Whenever I  introduce myself to people from town and they ask me what I do and I mention the word silage, they instantly screw up their noses and say something like “How can you work with that stuff, it stinks?” or they ask “Are you still married?” . .  .

How to install a ready-made food making business on your farm:

Making the transition from being a primary producer to processing and selling your own produce has become considerably cheaper, easier and less stressful thanks to an Anglo-French company that has created a new process that effectively builds a ‘barn inside a barn’.
Create-a-cabin has led a revolution in French farming by rapidly installing food-safe, highly flexible, and technically sophisticated food preparation rooms without the need for planning permission.
Across the Channel, Create-a-cabin’s custom-made, modular building shells have been erected quickly and cheaply for cheese-makers, poultry abattoirs, jam kitchens, meat packers, fish smokers and many more, allowing farmers to control at least one more link in the food production chain, as well as adding value to their product and thus  commanding a higher price. . .


Rural round-up

December 3, 2014

Rabobank Agri Commodity Market Research: Outlook 2015:

The fundamentals in the agri commodity markets appear more balanced through 2015. In their 2015 Outlook, the Rabobank Agri Commodities Markets Research (ACMR) analysts, expect narrower trading ranges for many commodities versus 2014. On the demand side, growth has slowed in recent years. However, lower price levels should now encourage consumption growth, which will support prices. Key variables to watch in the year ahead include US dollar strength, uncertain Chinese demand growth, slowing biofuel demand and oil price weakness.

Stefan Vogel, Global head of Rabobank (ACMR) said, “All in all, 2015 will be another interesting year for agri commodities. Macro drivers remain very much in play and price swings from supply and demand shocks are still likely, given that the stocks for most commodities are not yet at levels necessary to provide an adequate buffer.” . . .

NZ tractor sales hit decade high in Q3 on record dairy payout, high kiwi – Tina Morrison:

(BusinessDesk) – New Zealand tractor sales hit their highest level in a decade in the third quarter as farmers benefiting from this year’s record milk payout and the high local currency bought new equipment.

Tractor registrations rose 8.8 percent to 925 in the three months through September, from the same quarter a year earlier, according to Land Transport Safety Authority figures published by Statistics NZ. The three-month period would have captured orders from the NZ National Agricultural Fieldays at Mystery Creek in Hamilton in June, helping tractor registrations rise to their highest since the December 2004 quarter when they reached 970.

Farmers have been increasing their spending on equipment such as tractors, farm bikes, milking machines, irrigators, ploughs and harvesters this year as cash flows were boosted by Fonterra Cooperative Group’s record payout to dairy farmers of $8.40 per kilogram of milk solids for the 2013/14 season. Also helping drive sales was the higher value of the local currency, with the kiwi touching a record 82.03 in July when measured against a basket of major currencies on a trade-weighted basis, reducing the price of imported farm machinery. . .

 

Former Gordon Stephenson Trophy-Holders Reflect On Busy But Successful Year:

Winning the National Winner title in the 2013 Ballance Farm Environment Awards opened up a whole world of opportunity for Canterbury farmers Craige and Roz Mackenzie.

The Mackenzies handed over the Gordon Stephenson trophy to fellow Cantabrians Mark and Devon Slee in June 2014, but they are still as busy as ever.

Over the last 18-months they have hosted a string of national and international visitors on their intensive arable farm near Methven. As ambassadors for sustainable agriculture they have also travelled widely, spreading the sustainability message throughout New Zealand and overseas.

Earlier this year they toured Argentina, Chile and Uruguay, where they studied arable farming, dairying and beef production. A key aim of the trip, facilitated by the New Zealand Farm Environment Trust, was to exchange views on topics of crucial interest to New Zealand farmers and to showcase New Zealand’s stance on agricultural sustainability. . .

Shareholders pleased with Synlait Milk results:

Shareholders who attended Synlait Milk’s Annual Meeting of Shareholders today were pleased with the company’s solid financial performance and continued progress in the 2014 financial year.

Managing Director Dr John Penno discussed the annual results and outlined the focus for the 2015 financial year (FY).

“We’re pleased that we delivered on the promises we made last year by meeting our prospective financial information (PFI) forecasts. Our $19.6 million net profit after tax (NPAT) was in line with our PFI forecast of $19.7 million, and that’s a good result for our shareholders,” said Dr Penno. . .

 

A budget for farm wages always worth the effort – Chris Lewis:

There has been a lot of comment in the media and by the trusty keyboard warriors on what farmers should be paying staff and whether they are paying enough.

This week we are going to show farmers one correct way of paying staff, but this is only an example. No one size fits all and you may need to make changes to suit your individual circumstances and employees.

Before you start to hire staff, do a staff budget like you do for feed budgets showing deficits and surplus’s each period. If your staff requirements are anything like mine you will have found a need to hire additional staff for spring to manage the additional workload and time off needed through calving. . .

Consultant appointed to investigate Bee Industry restructure:

New Zealand’s bee industry has appointed a consulting firm to advise the industry on how best to unify under one peak representative body.

To date the industry has been represented by several bodies and membership

organisations, a situation that is inefficient and that stifles industry development said Kim Singleton, Chair of the Interim Industry Working Group established to manage this project.

“This process is about exploring options that provide a more effective and better resourced industry organisation and to do that we need an outside look in.  That’s why we’ve brought in a consultancy firm.” . .

Entries Closed in 2015 Dairy Awards:

A total of 539 entries have been received in the 2015 New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards, including the New Zealand Sharemilker/Equity Farmer of the Year, New Zealand Farm Manager of the Year and New Zealand Dairy Trainee of the Year competitions.

“It’s a great result and we are really thrilled with the response,” national convenor Chris Keeping says. “Given the circumstances with a lower forecast milk payout, a challenging spring in some parts of the country and a change to the timing of entries being accepted we are really pleased.

“The numbers ensure strong competitions will run in each of our 11 regions and that is great for the entrants, for the competitions and for us as organisers of the awards.” . .


Rural round-up

September 21, 2014

Diversity of services competing for awards – Sally Rae:

Three diverse Southern businesses are among the entrants in this year’s Rural Women New Zealand Enterprising Rural Women Awards. Agribusiness reporter Sally Rae finds out a little more about them.

A line-up of work boots outside Riversdale accountancy firm Hammond Davidson is not an unusual sight.

”There’s boots out there at the moment,” partner Kylie Davidson laughed yesterday, as she glanced at the front door of the business, where about 80% of the client base are farmers, farming support businesses or contractors. . .

One-stop irrigation know-how shop – Maureen Bishop:

A pilot project on 14 farms in Canterbury and North Otago has shown there is considerable scope to improve the efficiency of energy used in on-farm irrigation systems.

The pilot project was a partnership between Irrigation New Zealand (INZ), the Energy Efficiency Conservation Authority and the electricity lines companies of Canterbury and North Otago. It considered where there was an opportunity to improve the energy efficiency of on-farm irrigation systems and their operation and, if so, what the scale was. . .

Business with a twist in final – Sally Brooker:

A Timaru business is a finalist in this year’s Enterprising Rural Women Awards.

Irricon Resource Solutions Ltd is an environmental consultancy co-owned by Keri Johnston and Haidee McCabe. It is based at Washdyke but works throughout the South Island, offering services including designing dairy effluent systems, preparing and auditing Overseer nutrient budgets and farm environmental plans, water quality monitoring, aquifer and irrigation tests, ecological assessments, and resource consent advice.

Clients range from smallholdings to corporate farms. . .

  GM on the agenda at Roundtable – Tim Cronshaw:

The challenge of feeding another two billion people will go on the shoulders of Ashburton farmers Craige and Roz Mackenzie when they attend the Global Farmer Roundtable next month.

Craige Mackenzie became the first Kiwi to be invited to join farming leaders at the roundtable talks two years ago and was asked back to the event, which is part of the World Food Prize meetings in Iowa, United States. Roz has been officially invited after informally attending the last meeting.

The focus is on providing enough food for 9 billion people by 2050 through trade and technology and the subject of genetic modification (GM) to improve agriculture production – controversial in New Zealand – will be freely discussed. . . .

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