Rural round-up

November 30, 2013

Stressed rural families urged to get their men talking:

Families of farmers in Marlborough’s Awatere Valley are being urged to give the men on the farm the chance to talk.

The Top of the South Rural Support Trust says some rural males who live very close to the centre of August’s magnitude 6.6 earthquake at Lake Grassmere, are struggling to cope with the aftermath.

The trust says that it has observed serious signs of stress and depression.

Its field facilitator, Ian Blair, has this advice: “You got to get them into a relaxed attitude, and many times, the easiest way to do that is to sit round the table with a cup of tea. . .

Better management could cut farm emissions – study:

A study suggests greenhouse gas emissions and nitrogen leaching on farms can be signficantly reduced if farmers improve they way they manage their properties and use available technology.

The study the Motu Economic and Public Policy Research group used data from more than 260 farms to estimate the potential for reducing emissions and leaching.

Senior fellow Dr Suzi Kerr said the research found the best dairy farm operators are getting at least twice the milk production for each kilogram of nitrogen released. .  .

Paua battle almost over:

Last Wednesday, the Ministry for Primary Industries convened a meeting of over 15 key stakeholder representatives at Otakou Marae, Dunedin in an attempt to resolve the long-running battle over a proposal to open up closed populations of paua to commercial fishing.

Nine months after passionate New Zealanders first mobilised in their fight to protect one of the treasures of New Zealand’s south, the battle is finally drawing to a close.

This was the last of 3 meetings convened by MPI to uncover and report on further evidence and seek agreement from all parties about paua and paua diving in these four closed areas. . .

Emerging organic contaminants: A threat to New Zealand freshwaters? Sally Gaw:

Emerging organic contaminants are a burgeoning and extremely diverse class of contaminants that are not routinely monitored and that have the potential to have adverse ecological and human health effects. Emerging organic contaminants (EOCs) include both naturally occurring and synthetic chemicals.

Many of these contaminants may have been present in the environment for a long time but are only now have they become detectable due to advances in analytical chemistry. EOCs include active ingredients in personal care and domestic cleaning products, pesticides, plasticisers, pharmaceuticals, steroid hormones excreted by humans and animals, surfactants and veterinary medicines. Many EOCs are everyday chemicals in widespread use in consumer products. Much research is being devoted internationally to understanding the sources, environmental fate and adverse effects of EOCs. . .

Corbans wins Pure Elite Gold at Air New Zealand Wine Awards:

 Corbans has produced an outstanding result at this year’s prestigious Air New Zealand Wine Awards, with two of their Homestead range being awarded gold medals. 

Corbans Homestead Sauvignon Blanc 2012 won a ‘Pure Elite Gold’ at the Awards Gala in Queenstown over the weekend, one of only seven Sauvignon Blancs to receive the accolade.

The Sauvignon Blanc and Corbans Homestead Riesling 2012 had earlier won a ‘Pure Gold’ in their respective classes for their 100% sustainable wines. . .


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