Rural round-up

February 4, 2020

A word from the mayor – Hurunui District Council:

We heard Last week that our central government is increasing its spending on infrastructure. This is welcome news to local government who provide forty percent of New Zealand’s public infrastructure.

However, with this news comes a bit of disappointment. There is a feeling that South Island projects have been largely ignored and that the allocated spending fails to recognise the contributions and needs of the rural sector.

While the news itself is good, the government’s infrastructure spending priorities appear to focus on moving people and ignore the economic importance of agriculture. Our productive rural sector is reliant on road transport that allows goods to be moved from farm to market – the proposed infrastructure spend fails to recognise and value this from an economic perspective. . .

Outrage at government over new levy :

Farmers have taken to social media to express outrage at the Government over a new levy.

Last week, Rural News reported that the New Zealand Agricultural Aviation Association (NZAAA) was unhappy with a proposed new aerial safety levy.

NZAAA claims the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) levy unfairly targets the ag sector and will increase the costs of aerial spreading of fertiliser and spraying of crops. . .

Fodder beet yield unaffected by significant reductions in fertiliser – research :

New research shows that it is possible to reduce traditional fertiliser recommendations for growing fodder beet – sometimes by significantly more than half the usual amount – with no effect on crop yield or quality.

Plant & Food Research, along with industry partners, recently completed a three-year study with the assistance of the Ministry for Primary Industries’ (MPI’s) Sustainable Farming Fund (now superseded by Sustainable Food & Fibre Futures) to determine the best way to grow fodder beet, a popular supplementary feed crop for livestock in New Zealand.

The researchers conducted a series of nitrogen, potassium and boron trials to establish whether standard management practices could be recommended for varying soil types and locations. . . 

Revised weather messaging aims to prevent repeat of 2019 mass cattle deaths in Qld monsoon – Eric Barker:

Almost a year to the day after flooding in north-west Queensland killed more than 500,000 head of cattle, the monsoonal rain was forecast again.

Summer flooding is a regular event in the area and many graziers rely on it to sustain their businesses for the rest of the year.

But the 2019 monsoon was one of the biggest and most unusual on record and if the cattle survived the raging torrents, they died from a cold snap that coincided with the rain . . 

City girl loving rural life – George Ckarj:

‘‘I’m a city girl born and bred.’’

Anna Munro, who works at the Temuka saleyards, is originally from Christchurch but felt like she needed a change of scenery, finding peace in the idea of rural life.

‘‘I was born in the North Island but my dad was in the army, so we travelled a lot all over. I ended up in Christchurch for a while, met up with a really cool guy and moved down here.’’

Speaking to Central Rural Life during a recent stock sale, Ms Munro felt she needed to get involved with the community after purchasing a lifestyle block and some sheep. . . 

How a vegan diet could affect your intelligence – Zaria Gorvet:

The vegan diet is low in – or, in some cases, entirely devoid of – several important brain nutrients. Could these shortcomings be affecting vegans’ abilities to think?  

It was the late 1880s in the city of Rajkot, India. The meeting was to take place on the banks of the local river – and discretion was essential. Mahatma Gandhi, who was just a teenager at the time, hadn’t told his parents where he was going; if they had found out, they would have been shocked to death.

As it happens, Gandhi was having a picnic. And on this occasion, India’s future national hero – and one of the most famous vegetarians in history – wasn’t planning to dine on cucumber sandwiches. No, for the first time in his life, he was going to eat meat.

As he later wrote in his biography, Gandhi was raised as a strict Vaishnava Hindu, so he had never even seen meat before this fateful day. But his picnic companion was a shady character with an unusual obsession – the idea that meat held the key to being physically and mentally strong.

In the end, Gandhi braved the meat. It was as tough as leather. . .


NIght flights for Queenstown Airport

May 6, 2014

Queenstown airport has the go-ahead to begin night flights.

Currently the airport only allows flights to take off and land during daylight hours, thanks to its size and configuration as well as the terrain of surrounding mountains.

The Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) says the airport will have to undergo changes before the night-time flights are permitted, including widening the runway from 30m to 45m and adding extra lights to the runway, taxiway, approach and off-airport areas. The changes will also include specialised training for crew and pilots.

“Queenstown Airport Corporation and operators have shown a willingness to improve infrastructure and develop operational procedures to gain this approval,” says CAA director Graeme Harris. . . .

Had the people who decided the airport’s location been able to look ahead and see how the town, and surrounding area, would grow, the airport would almost certainly have been put somewhere else.

The rapid growth in the Queenstown Lakes District’s permanent population and tourism has boosted travel in and out of the area.

A lot of  people from North and Central Otago and Southland also use Queenstown in preference to Invercargill, Dunedin, Timaru and Christchurch airports.

Not allowing night flights is frustrating for business people who have to finish work in for example, Wellington or Auckland, earlier or stay there overnight.

The decision to allow night flights is good news for all travellers, be they coming and going for business and pleasure.

It might not be so welcome for the people who live in the flight paths.


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