Rural round-up

July 10, 2018

Waipahi young farmer keeps national title in South – Nicole Sharp:

Taking the bull by the horns, Logan Wallace did not let his second chance slip through his fingers and  won the FMG Young Farmer of the Year in Invercargill on Saturday night.

After competing in the grand final in 2016, Mr Wallace (28) had a rough idea of the battle in front of him on Thursday, Friday and Saturday. The technical day on Thursday tested mental strength, while the practical day on Friday tested both physical and mental ability before the quiz on Saturday evening.

Mr Wallace won the Ravensdown Agri-Skills Challenge, the Agri-Sports Challenge, Massey University Agri-Growth Challenge and the overall title. . . 

Chinese dairy giant Mengniu eyes formula expansion at Pokeno – Jamie Gray:

China’s Mengniu, through its subsidiary Yashili NZ, is looking at expanding its state-of-the-art infant formula plant at Pokeno, the company’s chief executive Lu Minfang said.

Lu, in an interview, said plans are afoot for a substantial expansion of the already busy plant, which opened late in 2015 at the end of Auckland’s Southern Motorway.

Last month French food giant Danone – which already has close ties with Mengniu and Yashili – said it planned to acquire up to 49 per cent of Yashili NZ. . . 

East Coast seeking solutions to slash floods a month after massive deluge – Patrick O’Sullivan:

The tsunami of forestry slash last month will likely happen again on the East Coast unless the industry stops clear felling erosion-prone area, says forester Chris Perley.

It’s been one month since a deluge in the hills above Tolaga Bay sent thousands of unwanted logs careering downhill – clogging up rivers, endangering lives and destroying homes.

Perley said similar events had occurred in Hawke’s Bay, such as in the Mohaka catchment eight years ago.. . .

Tough questions about ‘M. bovis’ raised by farmers – Nicole Sharp:

Hard questions were raised, some with no answers.

Farmers questioned the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) and industry representatives about disease testing and biosecurity issues at a Mycoplasma bovis meeting in Winton last month.

One question raised was how some farmers would sell young stock, such as bobby calves, because putting calves together at stockyards could spread the disease.

Beef + Lamb New Zealand policy and advocacy general manager Dave Harrison said if farm systems involved saleyards and bringing in more calves, then farmers needed to decide whether or not that was a risk they were willing to take.

”Saleyards are going to be a risk area,” he said.. . 

Fumigant use research under way at PFR :

Research into the use of Vapormate, or ethylformate (including CO2) as a potential fumigant to kill mites, and other insects infecting export apricots post harvest, is under way at Plant and Food Research’s (PFR) Clyde base.

Research associate Kate Colhoun said the fumigant ethylformate (EF), which was also known as Vapormate, had proven effective against flower thrips.

The fumigant was ”generally recognised as safe” (GRAS) by the US Food and Drug Administration, was fast acting, residue free and acceptable for most export markets. . . 

A2 milk wave coming – Woodford

Agribusiness expert Keith Woodford says within the next five years China could be accepting only A2 milk products.

Speaking at Federated Farmers Dairy conference in Wellington this morning, Woodford, a retired agribusiness professr, says the push for A2 milk won’t come from the Chinese Government but consumers.

He told dairy leaders that A2 milk was the “largest selling milk” in Australian supermarkets. “I know this because I’m part of the Australian A2 milk story,” he says. . . 

Looking back at a decade of deregulation – Gregor Heard:

It may seem like only yesterday, but July 1 marked 10 years since the Australian export wheat market was officially deregulated.

When the Rudd Government passed the Wheat Marketing Act of 2008, opening up the market to multiple exporters of bulk wheat, it marked the end of almost 70 years of single desk marketing.

Under the single desk, a national pool operated, with all wheat marketed on behalf of growers by the Australian Wheat Board. . . 


Rural round-up

January 9, 2017

Hold trade partners to account – Nigel Stirling:

They are expensive and have been used only sparingly in New Zealand’s history.

But one of the country’s top trade lawyers, Tracey Epps, says the Government shouldn’t shy away from taking cases against protectionist trading partners to the World Trade Organisation.

She tells Nigel Stirling why.

It amounted to a billion-dollar Christmas present for the country’s beef farmers. . . 

New plan ready to go – Alan Williams:

Farmers want Beef + Lamb NZ to step up its market development work and chairman James Parsons says a start is under way.

The new plan would involve more development work in key, mature markets alongside the export companies, Parsons said.

Promotions would be made only if companies were prepared to follow through with products and had already helped to develop the strategy. . . 

Reforming our regional economy – Chris Perley:

Why do we manage land the way we do? Why does New Zealand focus on ever-more gross production over a great scale of sameness?

Why do we talk of “feeding the world” when we can at best feed 40 million or so? Why do some defend the consequences of pollution of streams?

Why do we think we can keep on farming the way that we do, and then add some token riparian fences as some panacea solution – which it patently is not?

Enough with all the mechanical in-the-box thinking. It is leading us in a vicious treadmill downwards. . . 

High tech solution to invasive mammal pests – James Russell:

This year the Biological Heritage National Science Challenge in New Zealand launches its project on high tech solutions to invasive mammal pests, hosted by the University of Auckland. The high tech solutions project aims to deliver the long-term science solutions which will become a part of Predator Free New Zealand. In July 2016 the New Zealand government officially adopted Predator Free New Zealand and in December appointed the PFNZ2050 board of directors and announced its commitment to the Honolulu Challenge. In 2017 the high tech solutions project will commence researching the science which will eventually be needed to achieve the 2050 target. . . 

New Year honours for dairy, beef and wine leaders – Gerard Hutching:

Former National Cabinet minister John Luxton has been honoured with a Companion of the Order of New Zealand (CNZM) for his services to the dairy industry.

“This award is a recognition of the importance of the dairy industry, which is very innovative and responsible for earning nearly half New Zealand’s primary sector exports,” he said.

A National Party MP from 1987 to 2002, Luxton held numerous Cabinet portfolios including Agriculture, Housing and Commerce.

He oversaw the development of industry-good body DairyNZ, stepping down as chairman of the board last year, having held the position since 2008. . . 

Farm-turned-amusement park provides ‘good, wholesome, old fashioned fun‘ – David Burroughs:

If you’ve ever wanted to ride a cow, or get towed behind a tractor, or ride a bike like ET, you need to visit Fernbrooke Farm Amusement Park.

Sitting near the base of Mt Taranaki, the park is the brainchild of Stratford farmer Dave Hunger, who for the last five years has spent his spare time creating weird and wonderful machines and toys.

Hunger started bringing visitors on to his farm five years ago after making a trebuchet, similar to a catapult, out of a 13 metre long tree. . . 

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I work out (side).


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