Rural round-up

June 26, 2014

B+LNZ Lincoln Science Day: Farming 20/20 in 2020:

Thursday, 3 July 2014 Region: Northern South Island Location: 12.30-5pm: Stewart Building, Lincoln University By farmers. For farmers

Bookings are now open for this free farmer science event. Register today.

You will have heard about drones in agriculture, but have you seen one in action? Thought about selectively targeting stock to reduce drench resistance? Is clever winter feeding with fodder beet the latest game changer? How can your smartphone help you work smarter, not harder?

Come along and find out about the technologies that could take farming into the future. . . .

Why are dairy prices spiking?

It’s shaping up to be a historic year for America’s economically important dairy industry.

At the end of August, decades-old dairy price supports will change as the federal government ends its milk income loss contract (MILC) program. MILC guaranteed compensation for dairy producers if domestic milk prices fell below a certain level.

But dairy producers haven’t had to worry too much, at least for the present, about milk prices falling.

Despite a smaller overall beef and dairy herd, due in part to historic drought conditions across parts the U.S., the nation’s milk output is expected to reach a record 206.1 billion pounds this year, up nearly 5 billion pounds from 2013.

Dairy prices have also spiked. “We’ve never seen dairy prices and milk production this high at the same time,” Robin Schmahl, a commodities broker and owner of AgDairy in Elkhart Lake, Wisconsin,told AgWeb.com 
back in April. “For dairy producers, the futures looks brighter than it has for a long time.” . . .

Rangatahi learning about land:

It makes sense to upskill rangatahi who will eventually manage the farms on Maori land as more whenua is returned to iwi, the Taratahi Agricultural Training Centre says.

The Masterton-based centre has joined with Papawai Marae, near Greytown, to provide agricultural training for 15 Kuranui College students on the Ringa Raupa Ringa Ahuwhenua pilot programme.

Taratahi Maori Agribusiness co-ordinator Ben Matthews said it was important to guide young Maori on a rural career path to set them up for the future. . . .

Cow comfort key to stand-off pads:

Farmers considering investing in stand-off pads must make cow comfort their number one priority, according to new DairyNZ research.

Information from the three-year study into stand-off pads, a farm facility which helps farmers prevent pasture damage in wet weather, has been released in a new resource – Stand-off pads – your essential guide to planning, design and management.

DairyNZ farm systems specialist Chris Glassey says the research followed eight North Island farms with stand-off pads during the winter months of May until August. The Northland and Waikato farms were monitored for hours of pad use, pad stocking density, surface material deterioration and cow comfort. . . .

Progress on forestry safety action:

In the first five months of this year, the number of serious injuries reported in forestry has dropped by nearly half compared with last year, Labour Minister Simon Bridges says.

“This is positive news and indicates the work the whole industry – the regulator, the forestry companies, the contractors and the workers – has been doing is paying off, but this is not a time to celebrate,” Mr Bridges says.

“I remain concerned that WorkSafe New Zealand is continuing to find very serious levels of non-compliance in the industry.”

WorkSafe New Zealand figures show 46 serious injuries have been reported this year up to the end of May compared with 82 in the same period last year.  This year’s figures are substantially below the six year rolling average for the same period of 77.  . .

 

Media Release from the National Animal Welfare Advisory Committee (NAWAC):

New Zealanders are being invited to have their say on the newly drafted animal welfare standards for the temporary housing of companion animals.

The proposed Code of Welfare: Temporary Housing of Companion Animals describes the minimum standards and best practice guidelines that owners and people in charge of animals must achieve to meet their obligations under the Animal Welfare Act 1999.

“It is essential that owners and people in charge of companion animals in temporary housing facilities are aware of their welfare needs,” says Chair of NAWAC Dr John Hellström. . . .

Bee groups moving towards merger:

The two groups representing beekeepers look set to merge to act as one voice for the industry.

Federated Farmers launched its bee industry group in 2002 after a split with the National Beekeepers’ Association.

For the first time, the organisations are holding a joint conference in Whanganui.

Association president Ricki Leahy said there has been a positive reaction from the industry for them to unite soon. . . .

 


Rural round-up

July 28, 2013

Macraes project praised – Dene Mackenzie:

Hopes are high the review of Oceana Gold’s operations – particularly of its Macraes gold project – will not cut deeply into the Otago economy.

Otago Chamber of Commerce president Peter McIntyre said yesterday many people in Otago were not aware that such a constructive mining sector operated within the region.

Macraes was estimated to be worth around $100 million annually to the regional economy. . .

Water collectives recommended – Sally Brooker:

Farmers need to continue with collective ventures for better water quality, Federated Farmers says.

The theme of partnership for water progress was discussed by a panel at the federation’s national conference in Ashburton on July 4. Speaking first, former Rotorua-Taupo federation president Neil Heather said collaboration produced ”powerful action”.

He outlined the gains made in cleaning up Lake Rotorua’s water pollution, saying farmers needed to become informed. . .

Fewer cows can mean better profits – Sally Brooker:

The traditional approach to determining stocking rates needs to change, DairyNZ representative Chris Glassey says.

Presenting a paper at the recent South Island Dairy Event at Lincoln University, he said incoming nitrogen limits would force change.

”The optimum stocking rate is never a constant. This paper challenges the belief that more cows means more profit.” . .

Kiwi shearers fleece British opposition in test series – Ruth Grundy:

The two-man New Zealand shearing team has won the British leg of its northern hemisphere series.

Rowland Smith, of Hastings, and Tony Coster, of Rakaia, beat Ulster at the Rickamore Shears in Ireland on July 13,notching up the third win on their four-event 2013 Elders Primary Wool United Kingdom Tour.

The pair opened the UK series a fortnight earlier with a loss to Scotland at Lochearnhead Shears but quickly bounced back with two wins over England. . .

Bee numbers on the rise – Tim Cronshaw:

Commercial bee numbers are on the rise in spite of the varroa mite disease which has plundered wild bee stocks.

Bees in managed hives were hit hard by varroa, but hive treatment has allowed them to withstand the disease and their numbers have grown as demand for honey production and pollinating crops has increased.

Registered beehives are up about 7 per cent to 450,000 from last year and rising since 2005 along with increasing numbers of registered beekeepers.

Federated Farmers North Canterbury chairman Barry Hantz said good prices for manuka honey had encouraged beekeepers to put in more hives, particularly in the North Island. . .

Didymo find ‘gutting’ – Rebecca Fox:

The battle to keep Fiordland didymo-free has been lost.

The invasive algae has been discovered in the remote Large Burn valley.

Western Fiordland was one of the ”last frontiers” to remain free of didymo in the South Island, despite it being originally discovered in the nearby Waiau River in 2004, Department of Conservation freshwater ranger Lyndsay Murray said yesterday.

”It’s pretty gutting really. It’s the first confirmed positive sample of a waterway west of the divide.” . . .


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