Who’s the PCBU?

August 5, 2016

Just wondering: who is the PCBU (person in charge of a business or undertaking) when a stripper is performing for professional rugby players?

Is it the Chiefs rugby franchise, the person who hired the stripper, all the players who watched her, the stripper’s agent or the stripper herself?

Whoever it is, under the most recent health and safety legislation the PCBU is ultimately responsible for ensuring a workplace is safe but every worker also shares responsibility.

At risk of courting accusations of victim blaming, turning up alone to strip in front of a bunch of drunk young men isn’t taking your safety at work seriously.

It’s a bit like leaving the lights on and doors and windows open when you go out at night. It wouldn’t make it right for someone to burgle your house, but you would be at least naive if not foolhardy to make it so easy for them to do so.

This doesn’t make the reported behaviour of the audience acceptable. An invitation to look is not an invitation to touch and no always means no.

Also wondering: where does misogyny, (the dislike, hatred or mistrust of, contempt for, or ingrained prejudice against women) begin?

Watching strippers doesn’t necessarily demonstrate hatred of women. But people don’t watch them in appreciation of their intellect or personality and I’m not sure if it’s possible to watch a striptease act without being guilty of contempt for and objectification of the stripper.

But where does that misogyny start – watching the stripper, ordering one, being an employer of or agent for one, or being one?

If you’re a stripper are you merely acting on your right to do what you want and earn some money in the process, or are you enabling misogynism?

Also wondering: is there more than a little irony that the story of the rugby players and the stripper coincide with another about actor Orlando Bloom paddle boarding naked and is that objectifying him?


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