Rural round-up

August 27, 2015

Farmers not off the hook on health and safety:

It’s a complete fallacy that the farming community doesn’t have to worry about health and safety as a result of proposed changes to the Health and Safety Reform Bill, according to an expert in the field.

Crowe Horwath agri health and safety expert Melissa Vining says the recent hype around proposed changes have monopolised the headlines in recent days with many accusing the government of letting farmers off the hook.

However she is quick to dispel the myth that farmers have been given a mandate to ignore health and safety. . . 

Landcorp posts 2014/15 annual results:

Landcorp has recorded a net operating profit of $4.9 million on revenue of $224.3 million for the year ended 30 June 2015.

The $4.9 million net operating profit is down from the $30 million result the previous year. The sharp decline in the price of milk solids, combined with lower lamb prices, saw income from farm products drop 11.7 per cent on the previous year, to $213.5 million.

Landcorp chief executive Steven Carden said record-low dairy prices and tough growing conditions had driven overall financial performance down. However, a constructive response to challenging conditions had helped buffer Landcorp from major impact. . .

New Zealand in unique position for ‘water development’:

New Zealand has many advantages over the rest of the world when it comes to ‘water development’ but we need to get better at leveraging water use – for our future well-being and to protect us from the effects of climate change, says IrrigationNZ CEO Andrew Curtis.

This week is World Water Week 2015 with a theme of ‘Water for Development’. More than 3000 people, including world leaders, water experts and international aid organisations, have gathered in Stockholm, Sweden to debate solutions for water crisis around the globe at an annual symposium run by the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI) (www.worldwaterweek.org.nz).

Mr Curtis says New Zealanders are blissfully unaware of the relative advantage New Zealand has with plentiful rivers, lakes and groundwater supply across the country. . . 

Huge potential in Chathams – farmer:

The Chatham Islands has a huge, untapped potential for farming but a better understanding of soils is needed, one of the islands’ farmers says.

The islands are part of New Zealand and lie 750km east of the South Island.

Federated Farmers Chatham Islands chair Tony Anderson said there were 15 large farming operations there but many farmers worked a second job in the fishing industry. . . 

‘Power Play’ Innovation in Dairy Awards:

Entrants in the 2016 Dairy Manager of the Year contest will play to their strengths with a ‘power play’ initiative among the new judging criteria.

The change is one of many to the 2016 New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards programme, aimed at enabling more people to enter the awards competitions and at ensuring people with similar age, skills, maturity and investment in the industry compete against each other.

National convenor Chris Keeping says other changes include new competition names, entry and judging criteria – like the power play. . . 

OMG Dairy NZ Confessions Stories Advice's photo.


In praise of erudition

September 27, 2014

National’s candidate for Rongatai, Hon Chris Finlayson writes on his campaign for the elucidation of readers of the Spectator:

Every three years in New Zealand, incumbent politicians must hit the campaign trail. Since 2008, I have chased votes in the Rongotai electorate. My Labour opponent, Annette King, has held the seat since 1996. She is a fine parliamentarian, a thoroughly nice person, and also a distant cousin on my mother’s side. ‘Chris says if he wins Rongotai, he’ll ask for a recount,’ she delights in telling voters. This is supposed to be a joke but, under New Zealand’s mixed member proportional voting system, winning individual seats is not the be all and end all. The number of seats a party has in Parliament is determined by a party vote, and local representatives by a separate electorate vote. As a list MP standing in a traditional left seat my job is to maximise the party vote for National.

The Rongotai electorate takes in Wellington’s rugged southern coast, the Miramar Peninsula and the working class suburbs of Newtown and Berhampore, which are fast gentrifying and turning from red to green. Its furthest boundary is the Chatham Islands, an archipelago around 700km from the mainland. It is a place of isolated natural beauty, rich cultural history, abundant fisheries and distinctively salty mutton. On my most recent trip, the twin-propeller plane was struck by lightning and my stay had to be extended by two days. There is no cellular reception in the Chathams, adding to its attractiveness.

The Newtown debate is usually the rowdiest of the campaign. In 2011, I was shoved by an Anglican vicar as I made my way out. This year, there are ten candidates lined up across the stage facing the audience squeezed into a wooden church hall. The crowd has a very particular strand of rule-bound, suburban radicalism: every mention of ‘revolution’ is cheered, but the audience will not allow proceedings to begin while party signs are blocking the fire exits. Along with Annette, the candidates include Russel Norman, a Tasmanian who relocated to New Zealand to work for the Green Party and now, holding the office of Male Co-leader, campaigns against foreign ownership. He finds himself fighting candidates from the populist Conservative and New Zealand First parties for the xenophobe vote. The Newtown audience thinks I am insufferably right wing but also thinks the same about the Greens and Labour. Dr Norman is accused of dismissing victims of sexual assault. Annette King gets a frosty reception for her party’s track record on Maori issues. I am roundly booed when I say the audience is ‘redistributionist’. More popular are a young man dressed as a shark and representing the Climate Party (his contribution to the debate is ‘learn to swim’) and also the candidate for the Patriotic Revolutionary Front. The PRF wants a benevolent dictatorship and has a leaflet showing a composite picture of Stalin and Einstein as its ideal leader. . .

It’s not just what he says but the way that he says it.

Oh to have the ability to write so eruditely, and also to have been a better Latin scholar.

Can anyone translate his quote (in the paragraph which follows the extract I’ve used) from Horace: parturiunt montes, nascetur ridiculus mus ?

I tried Google and got the mountains are in labour, security issues. Even without dim memories of third form Latin I would doubt that is what it means.


Rural round-up

May 5, 2014

Luxury lifestyle pays milksolids dividend – Heather Chalmers:

The middle of the Mid-Canterbury plains is an unlikely place to find two massive barns housing milking cows.

Unlike New Zealand’s typical outdoors pastoral grazing system, the 950 cows from Pannetts Dairies’ herd at Mitcham, near Rakaia, spend most of their milking season inside the purpose-built barns.

While cows are free to wander out to paddocks if they wish, it is no wonder they prefer the indoors life, where their every need is catered for. As well as having a nutritionally complete feed available at all times, cows can rest on one of the 940 individual beds lined with rubber mats and make use of an automated back scratcher resembling a carwash brush. Using the barn system, cows will be milked and calve year round, rather than the more typical spring-calving seasonal production. . .

Living at the mercy of milk prices – Lyn Webster:

Being a non-shareholding supplier, my only vested interest in Fonterra is my cows and machinery.

In the perfect world I should be raking in enough cash to pay my lease, increase production and start buying my own shares.

But at the rate I’m going with drought and drying off early and doing eff-all production, it seems like a bad joke and I continue to rely on the farm owners’ shareholding to supply milk.

I am in a strange position as most dairy farmers own both cows and company shares, but I am also not alone because I bet there are many sharemilkers out there whose contracts changed after TAF and they are receiving milk price only and no dividend. . .

 Truffle season ready to delight – Ashley Walmsley:

THEY probably aren’t going to fill the winter fruit bowl of most kitchens but Australian black truffles are now in season.

One truffle expert is doing her best to educate Australians on exactly what to do with the highly prized delicacy.

Sara Hinchey of Melbourne’s Truffle Hound said even those without royal (French or Italian) blood can revel in the rich yield of black truffles from the colder regions of the nation.

Ms Hinchey’s expertise has led her to team up with several leading Melbourne restaurateurs in a series of special dinners and workshops to showcase a range of ways to prepare and consume this extraordinary and little understood subterranean mushroom. . .

An affinity for the rural sector – Sally Rae:

When David Paterson started work as a rural valuer more than 30 years ago, things were very different.

A day could be spent walking over a farm using rudimentary equipment, as there was no such thing as digital cameras or GPS units.

”When I started in 1981, you’d sit on top of a hill and look down and try and draw on the map where a gully was. Nowadays, of course, technology really has taken control,” Mr Paterson, the Dunedin-based national manager for Rural Value, said. . .

Interest in 9 dairy farms ‘positive‘ – Simon Hartley:

The likely multimillion-dollar sale of nine Southland farms owned by debt-ridden state-owned enterprise Solid Energy appear set to be concluded.

In what was considered one of the largest multi-farm offerings in the country, tenders closed a month ago on the more than 2000ha of the combined nine farms, which covered millions of tonnes of low-grade lignite coal.

PGG Wrightson real estate general manager Peter Newbold had been confident of interest in the farms, given recent demand for dairy land had exceeded supply. . . .

Budget 2014: New funding for rural and Māori housing:

The Government has announced new funding of $16 million over four years to support the repair and rebuild of rural housing, the improvement of housing on the Chatham Islands and the development of Māori social housing providers.

“New Zealanders living in remote rural areas face a number of unique and often difficult challenges, including the cost and availability of decent housing,” Associate Housing Minister Tariana Turia says.

“That is why the Government has allocated funding to improve housing in rural New Zealand, including the Chatham Islands. Compared to the rest of the population, significantly more Māori are experiencing housing deprivation and are more likely to be state tenants or renters than home owners.

“Iwi are incorporating housing into their long-term planning and the Government currently has accords with at least five iwi. Budget 2014 will take major steps to help iwi and the Crown achieve these housing aspirations. . . .


Rural round-up

October 20, 2012

Kiwifruit breeder honoured for $3 billion contribution:

The inaugural kiwifruit industry award – the Hayward Medal – was presented last night to a kiwifruit breeder whose work has added around $3 billion to the industry and the New Zealand economy, Russell Lowe from Plant & Food Research.

The new award is named after another great horticulturalist and kiwifruit breeder, Hayward Wright, whose innovation and contribution established the industry. The kiwifruit Industry Advisory Council (IAC) established the Hayward Medal and IAC chairman Bruce Cameron presented Russell with the award at Zespri’s kiwifruit industry conference Momentum, saying his work defined the kiwifruit industry. . .

Commission releases draft report on first statutory review of Fonterra’s milk price manual

The Commerce Commission has today released a draft report on its first statutory review of Fonterra’s milk price manual. The manual determines how Fonterra calculates the farm gate milk price, which is the price paid by Fonterra to dairy farmers for their raw milk.

This is the first of two statutory reviews that the Commission is required to undertake each milk season under the 2012 amendments to the Dairy Industry Restructuring Act 2001 (DIRA).

This first statutory review requires the Commission to report on the extent to which Fonterra’s milk price manual is consistent with the purpose of the milk price monitoring regime. The purpose of the regime is to promote the setting of a farm gate milk price that provides incentives for Fonterra to operate efficiently while providing for contestability in the market for the purchase of milk from farmers. . .

Why co-operatives in farming? – Anti-Dismal:

A few days ago Ele Ludemann at the Homepaddock blog noted that Co-ops key to feeding world and in a sense she is right. Co-ops are more common in argiculture than any other sector of the economy. The big question is Why?

To see why start from the idea that there are two basic ways to organise production, via contracts or via ownership. So what are the costs of each? First consider the costs of contracting. In farming one reason for the formulation of co-operatives was monopsony power. Farming is a business with many producers of highly homogeneous commodities. It is one of the most competitive of all industries. In contrast, the middlemen-handlers and processors – who purchase farm products are often highly concentrated and hence have the potential for exercising a degree of monopsony power over the farmers they deal with. Such monopsony power can be accentuated by seasonality or perishability of agricultural products. . .

Moovers and shakers in dairy industry – Linda Clarke:

Rakaia dairy farmers Rebecca and Brent Miller live in a fish bowl.

Their 1070-cow farm borders State Highway 1 just north of the Rakaia overbridge, and every man and his dog can see what they are up to.

Rebecca says the couple jokes about living in the limelight, but they farm with pride, knowing the cows and land they manage are scrutinised regularly by passing dairy farmers and are often photographed by tourists, who are taken by the green grass, black and white cows and snowcapped mountains. . .

Meatworks plans for Chathams – Gerald Piddock:

The viability of a meat processing plant on the Chatham Islands will be decided by its farmers later this month following the completion of a study into the feasibility of the facility.

The study was finished last Friday and will be presented to the Chatham Islands Enterprise Trust committee later this week.

From there it will be discussed with the islands’ farmers and other interest groups over the next fortnight, Chatham Islands Enterprise Trust chief executive Brian Harris said. . .

And from Facebook:


July 4 in history

July 4, 2009

On July 4:

1865 Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland was published. 

1845 Irish philanthropist Thomas Barnado was born.

1868 Te Kooti  escaped from the Chathams.

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