Rural round-up

November 20, 2017

Out fishing while his cows milk – Mark Daniel:

Dairy farming was always a likely career path for Graham Barlow, of Fermanagh Farm, in the Piako district of Waikato.

The farm name gives a clue to the family heritage: a great-grandfather came to New Zealand from County Fermanagh in northwest Ireland many moons ago.

Milking 320 Jerseys calving in March (75%) and November (25%) on 90ha, Barlow went straight from schooling to dairy farming, soon realised he hated milking but was interested in all things technical; he describes himself as a techno-geek. . .

62 years and counting:

AI technician Don Shaw (79) has been surrounded by dairy cows his entire life, bringing many calves into the world.

Raised on an Ohaupo farm, Shaw is a fourth generation New Zealand dairy farmer. For the last 62 years he’s worked as an AI technician, inseminating about 250,000 cows.

Although now retired from a sales consultant role at CRV Ambreed, Shaw is still an AI technician, working October and November on four Waikato farms, inseminating cows. . . 

First and second wins for southern family in Mate & Wool cup – Pat Deavoll:

The Gibson family of Foulden Hill, Middlemarch earned a quinella when their cattle took out first and second places in the Meat & Wool Cup at the Canterbury A&P Show.

Yearling hereford bull Foulden Hill Mustang narrowly pipped its two-year-old santa gertrudis colleague to take the title. 

What’s more, Mustang had earlier won the Junior Meat & Wool Cup over a charolais heifer owned by the Fisher family of Banks Peninsula. . . 

Open Gates:

The whole country cares about what’s happening with our waterways, including us.

And we want to show you what we’re doing to protect them. Things like planting, fencing to keep cows out of the water and managing nitrogen. So, come and visit one of the 40 farms we’re opening.

Open Gates is a chance to talk first hand to farmers, walk around their farm and see what they’re doing to care for the environment and their animals. It’s also an opportunity to ask them about their farm management and future plans.  . . 

Gene discovery may halt world-wide wheat epidemic

University of California, Davis, researchers have identified a gene that enables resistance to a new devastating strain of stem rust, a fungal disease that is hampering wheat production throughout Africa and Asia and threatening food security worldwide.

The discovery by UC Davis wheat geneticist Jorge Dubcovsky and his team will help breeders more quickly develop varieties that can fend off the deadly pathogens and halt a worldwide wheat epidemic.

The findings were recently published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Wheat and stem rust have been in an evolutionary arms race for more than 10,000 years. . .

Collecting information from farm machinery ot gain insight – Johanna Legatt:

DON’T be thrown off by the odd-looking acronym and the complex-sounding jargon.

The Internet of Things (IoT) is really just a fancy way of talking about new technology that talks to each other with minimal human intervention.

“The concept is simply based around connected devices — they can be sensors, monitors or some sort of data-collecting device, that help perform an automatic action, such as closing a gate or recording the soil temperature,” explains General Manager of Research at the Australian Farm Institute Richard Heath.

“These devices then talk to other devices that help farmers make better decisions.” . . 

 


Rural round-up

November 19, 2017

Further 1000 Mycoplasma Bovis cattle to be culled in South Canterbury – Ryan Dunlop:

A further 1000 cattle will be culled in South Canterbury due to the cattle disease Mycoplasma Bovis.

According to the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), that will bring the total cull number up to 5000.

Meanwhile several people have applied to the ministry for compensation for loss of livestock and productivity. 

On Wednesday, MPI confirmed another farm in South Canterbury was infected with the disease, bringing the total infected properties to eight. . . 

Safe’s distortion of harmless farming practice – Jon Morgan:

 Take a look at this video supplied by the animal rights group, Safe. It shows a cow running behind a car towing a trailer holding three calves.

Safe sent the video to TVNZ and it has been picked up by other news organisations and run by them without any attempt to find out what is actually happening.

Safe alleges that this is a “distressed” cow “chasing” after her calves, showing a strong bond between them.

However, the overwhelming opinion of dairy farmers who have seen the video is that nothing of the kind is happening. . . 

Wool sale best in a long time – Alan Williams:

Prices gained ground across the board at Thursday’s special live wool auction at the Christchurch A&P Show.

“Best sale in a long time,” PGG Wrightson South Island sales manager and auctioneer Dave Burridge said.

He estimated nearly $6 million of wool was sold at the sale, the second auction staged at the show.

First-up at the sale was the New Zealand Merino co offering and auctioneer Mike Hargadon later noted a little more enthusiasm on the buyer bench than at the usual market venue, in what was a very firm market for its fine wools. . . 

Shearing: Tony Coster wins national title at Canterbury Show:

Former New Zealand representative shearer and multiple national all-breeds champion Tony Coster reckoned he only shore in yesterday’s New Zealand Corriedale Championship to get out of doing a job.

But trading the job he says he would have otherwise been doing produced unexpected results, for the now 50-year-old Rakaia veteran when he beat World champion John Kirkpatrick by over a minute in a six-man final over 12 sheep each and won the Canterbury Show feature for a third time.

“I’m on the committee, or at least I help run a few things,” he said. “If I hadn’t shorn I would have had a few jobs to do.” . . 

ACCC set to deliver “myth busting” analysis of $1/L milk selling – Colin Bettles:

MICK Keogh has delivered a comprehensive update of the competition watch-dog’s legal enforcement and oversight activities in different troublesome segments of agricultural supply chains.

Mr Keogh – a long term policy analyst and respected commentator at the Australian Farm Institute – is one of seven Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) Commissioners and is spearheading its Agricultural Enforcement and Engagement Unit.

He spoke at an Agribusiness Australia forum in Canberra last week providing a frank assessment of current competition issues which carry economic and political consequences, for the farm sector,

That list includes an ongoing inquiry into the dairy supply chain that’s set to deliver a “myth busting” report in terms of dissolving common misconceptions about food retailers selling $1 per litre milk. . . 

 


Rural round-up

November 16, 2017

Irrigation water flows at Sheffield as new scheme starts – Heather Chalmers:

Sheffield arable farmer Damon Summerfield expects to double his production following the arrival of water from the massive Central Plains Water irrigation scheme, writes Heather Chalmers.

If Central Canterbury arable farmer Damon Summerfield is acting like an expectant farmer it’s no surprise. This “baby” has been 10 years in the making.

He’s even talking about a christening which is apt when the “baby” is irrigation water as part of the Central Plains Water community scheme. . .

Farmer vigilance helps keep sheep measles at low ebb:

New Zealand recorded its lowest lamb prevalence level of sheep measles in ten years, says the project manager for Ovis Management Ltd, Dan Lynch.

He says 0.59% of lambs processed in the season ending October were detected with sheep measles versus 0.64% last season.

Lynch believes this low prevalence reflects continuing onfarm control being exerted by farmers across NZ. “This is a great outcome.” . . .

Beef + Lamb New Zealand Chairman James Parsons not seeking re-election:

James Parsons, Chairman of Beef + Lamb New Zealand (B+LNZ), announced today he will not be seeking re-election in the organisation’s director elections in March.

Mr Parsons, who farms a 478-hectare hill country farm in Tangowahine, Northland, has served as the Northern North Island Director on the B+LNZ Board for nine years, including four as Chairman.

“Although I am still very energised as the organisation’s Chairman, another three-year term would mean 12 years on the board and seven years as Chairman,” says Mr Parsons. . .

Beef + Lamb New Zealand invites director nominations and remits/resolutions for Annual Meeting:

Beef + Lamb New Zealand (B+LNZ) today announced nominations have opened for two B+LNZ director roles and one position on its Directors’ Independent Remuneration Committee (DIRC).

Under the requirements of the B+LNZ constitution, two electoral district directors and one existing DIRC member retire by rotation at the annual meeting.

This year, directors Phil Smith (Northern South Island), and James Parsons (Northern North Island), and DIRC member Derrick Millton will be those retiring by rotation. They are permitted to seek re-election. Mr Parsons announced this week he will not be seeking re-election as a director. . .

Rabo NZ chief Daryl Johnson resigns after less than two years in the job – Sophie Boot:

(BusinessDesk) – Rabobank New Zealand chief executive Daryl Johnson has resigned, less than two years after taking over the reins of the rural lending specialist.

Johnson’s resignation will take effect on Dec. 22, and Rabobank NZ has commenced a process to appoint a new chief executive officer, chair Henry van der Heyden said in a statement to the NZX. Johnson joined the bank in July last year, having previously led National Australia Bank’s Asia business. . . .

Water scientist hits back at claims around Waimea dam plan – Cherie Sivgnon:

The Waimea River, near Nelson, will be dry most summers if more water is pumped from the aquifers under the plains without augmentation, according to Landcare Research water scientist Andrew Fenemor.

If minimum flows in the river were to be maintained and seawater intrusion avoided, there needed to be limits on water taken from the aquifers, he said.

Fenemor is a former Tasman District Council environmental manager and a member of the newly formed Community Water Solutions Advisory Group, set up to advise the council and its proposed joint-venture partner in the $82.5 million dam project, Waimea Irrigators Ltd. . . 

Canterbury A&P Show: ‘Amazing’ weather and crowds for day one – Oliver Lewis:

Bryce Black has been described as the “chief stirrer” and “ring entertainer” during his long tenure at the Canterbury A&P Show.

The 87-year-old has almost never missed a show and has presided over the movement of horses into the ring for the past 70 years.

On Wednesday, the opening day of the 155th event, the Tai Tapu local was in his caravan right on the edge of the Main Arena. . . .

There’s more farmland in the world than was previously thought – Megan Durisin:

There’s more agricultural land in the world than previously thought, and India rather than the U.S. or China is now believed to have the biggest acreage of any country, according to new study aimed at improving food and water security.

Global cropland totals 1.87 billion hectares (4.62 billion acres), 15 percent to 20 percent higher than earlier estimates, according to a map released Tuesday by the U.S. Geological Survey. The increase is due to the assessment of areas previously mapped inaccurately, or left unmapped, the USGS said in a statement. . .

 


Rural round-up

July 20, 2014

Back agriculture back our Roads:

Federated Farmers welcomes the Government’s announcement to increase investment in our deteriorating rural roads, but has concerns at whether it will be enough.

“A proposed increase of 4.3 percent per annum for local road improvements, and a 2.4 percent increase for local road maintenance, is long overdue but it remains to be seen whether it is enough.” says Katie Milne, Federated Farmers Local Government Spokesperson.

“To date, the investment in our rural roads has not kept up with inflation and it is evident in each pot hole and/or goat track that farmers, families, school buses and contractors navigate everyday.

“We are pleased this is now being addressed but is it a sufficient recognition of the importance of roading to an economy reliant on primary production, and in turn it’s long rural roads? . . .

More places earmarked for rural medical students:

Health Minister Tony Ryall has today announced there will be an additional 34 medical places for students next year at our two medical schools, including more positions earmarked for rural students.

Mr Ryall made the announcement at Taumarunui Hospital, a busy rural health facility in the King Country with around 100 staff. 

“Research shows that students who grew up in rural areas, such as Taumarunui, are more likely to go back and work in those areas. These extra places will help encourage more doctors to work in our rural communities,” says Mr Ryall.

“Since 2009 this government has now funded 170 extra medical school places. . . .

New Zealand Seafood Industry Assures Australian Consumers that its Seafood is Sustainable:

The Australian Marine Conservation Society (AMCS) list of imported fish that it’s telling consumers to stay away from, sounds like an ‘underarm delivery’ to the New Zealand industry.

Seafood New Zealand’s Chairman George Clement says it seems that the AMCS is has just gone through a list of imported seafood to arbitrarily warn people against most of it.

“Species by species, as we go through them, we can see how misinformed the AMCS report is. They’ve provided no transparent criteria nor openness in their assessments. There’s no indication that they have actually challenged themselves to examine the facts when they’ve drawn up their list.” . . .

Seafood New Zealand welcomes community funding for seabird conservation work:

Seafood New Zealand today welcomed Conservation Minister Dr Nick Smith’s announcement that the Government will provide $300,000 of funding to two community groups to support their work in protecting some of New Zealand’s special seabirds.

The seafood industry is one of the founding partners in the Southern Seabird Solutions Trust which has received $100,000 towards a seabird smart recreational fishing initiative that aims to reduce the number of birds accidentally caught by recreational fishers in the upper North Island. . . .

From the last will and testament of a farmer c1986 – Gravedodger:

To my Wife,  my bank overdraft. Maybe she has an explanation for it.

To my Banker, I bequeath my soul, he has the mortgage on it anyway.

To my nearest and dearest neighbor, my clown suit, he claims he is going to carry on farming.

To The Rural Bank, my grain silo and my Fertilizer Bin, he has them as chattel security anyway.

To the local scrap metal dealer, every item of crap machinery I have gone to extraordinary lengths to keep from his possession. . . .

Otago woman named NZ’s top young amenity horticulturist:

New Zealand’s top young amenity horticulturist has been found after an intense day of competition at the Young Amenity Horticulturist of the Year event in Hamilton yesterday.

The annual competition is run by the New Zealand Recreation Association (NZRA) and serves as the qualifier for the prestigious Horticulturist of the Year competition, which will be hosted in Auckland in November.

Otago woman Sarah Fenwick emerged as the judge’s choice after planning, planting and potting her way to victory. The 30-year-old former vet nurse narrowly beat second place getter Josh van der Hulst, from Kamo, to take out the prize. . . .

Tax officials to work with bloodstock breeding industry:

Racing Minister Nathan Guy and Revenue Minister Todd McClay have confirmed that Inland Revenue officials will work with the New Zealand Thoroughbred Breeders’ Association on a number of tax issues raised by the industry.

The issues cover questions the NZTBA has over the application of tax rules for the industry and are expected to be dealt with as part of the normal consultative process between the private sector and tax officials.

“We are confident that the majority of the issues can be worked through, providing a positive result and greater certainty for what is an important industry to New Zealand,” Mr McClay says. . . .

Entries open for New Zealand’s largest A&P Show:

Show organisers for the 2014 Canterbury A&P Show are calling upon showing enthusiasts from throughout New Zealand to send in their entries and compete in the country’s largest Agricultural and Pastoral Show. For over 150 years, The Show has been attracting and showcasing New Zealand’s best animals and talented competitors. In addition to showing success, exhibitors will be competing for over $100,000 in prize money.

More than 3000 animals and close to 1000 competitors are expected to compete in 1700 classes including sections for horse and pony, beef and dairy cattle, sheep, alpaca, llama, wool, goat, dog trials, poultry, shearing and woolhandling, woodchopping and vintage machinery. Entries are also open for two of the feature competitions of The Show – the Mint Lamb Competition where New Zealand’s top lambs are put to a taste test, and the Young Auctioneers Competition where up-and-coming stock agents get to show off their skills. . . .


Rural round-up

November 19, 2012

Fonterra Shareholders’ Council opposes resolution:

The Fonterra Shareholders’ Council, is advising the dairy co-operative’s farmer owners to reject a proposal aimed at reinforcing their control of the board and company.

A group of farmers has put forward a resolution calling for a minimum of nine farmer-elected directors on the board and a maximum of four appointed directors. . .

NZ producer prices fall in 3Q, led by electricity, dairy:

New Zealand producer input and output prices fell last quarter, led by electricity and dairy products, confirming there’s still little sign of inflation pressures in the economy.

Producer input prices, or prices paid by producers, fell 1 percent, the first quarterly decline since the third quarter of 2009, following a 0.6 percent gain three months earlier, according to Statistics New Zealand. Output prices, or prices received by producers, fell 0.9 percent, the biggest drop since the third quarter of 2009, after gaining 0.3 percent in the second quarter.

The government statistician already released inflation data for the third quarter last month, showing the consumer price index rose a smaller-than-expected 0.3 percent, for an annual pace of 0.8 percent, below the central bank’s 1 percent-to-3 percent target band. . .

No Canterbury show without characters – Sally Rae:

When Woodbury Lilly was named supreme champion animal at the Canterbury A and P Show three years ago, it was a “magical” experience for Clydesdale breeders Jim and Deborah Cook.

The Cook family, from Cust, in Canterbury, are regular exhibitors at the show and took four horses to this year’s event.

Mrs Cook recalled that when Lilly was in the ring being judged she noticed the mare had a real presence about her. . .

Stoneleigh New Vintage Release Wins Gold at the Sydney International Wine Competition:

Stoneleigh has been awarded a Blue-Gold Medal for the new vintage release of one of its most exciting wines, Stoneleigh Rapaura Series Pinot Noir 2011, at the Sydney International Wine Competition 2013.

Stoneleigh Rapaura Series Marlborough Pinot Noir 2011, awarded in the Pinot Noir category, is a single vineyard wine showing finesse and purity of flavour garnered from the unique gravel stony soils of the original Stoneleigh vineyard in the heart of the Rapaura region, Marlborough, New Zealand.

Jamie Marfell Stoneleigh Winemaker says to win a Blue-Gold Medal at the Sydney International Wine Competition is a true testament to the purity and quality of Pinot Noir coming from Rapaura. . .

Biodiesel deal great for growers:

Federated Farmers Grain & Seed welcomes the sale of Solid Energy’s agribusiness division of Biodiesel New Zealand has been concluded and a new company, Pure Oil New Zealand Limited, has been formed.

“After hearing a few weeks ago it was possible Solid Energy could simply shut the doors of Biodiesel, this is the news oilseed rape growers have been waiting for,” says Federated Farmers South Canterbury Grain & Seed Chairman and oilseed rape grower, Colin Hurst. . .

Wool group to give report ‘serious consideration’:

The Wool Unity Group says it will give serious consideration to recommendations made in a report it commissioned from professional services company KPMG.

The group was formed following a crisis meeting the Primary Industries Minister held three years ago after farmers voted to dump a levy to fund wool promotion.

Chairman Colin Harvey says the report identified problems as well as opportunities in the wool industry which need to be addressed. . .

Sustainable Farming Film Festival:

Practical examples of sustainable farming techniques such as polyface farming, permaculture, forest gardens, edible cattle hedges, biological farming and organics all feature in a Sustainable Farming Film Festival coming to Okato’s Hempton Hall next Saturday 24 November.

Climate Justice Taranaki have hit the headlines a lot since they formed in late 2010, criticising new oil and gas exploration, in particular the dangerous technique called fracking, but the group is not just about saying ‘NO’ to more fossil fuels. Climate Justice Taranaki has also made it their responsibility to help get solutions out to those in positions to significantly reduce fossil fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions. Farming is one industry that contributes a fair chunk of the country’s greenhouse gas emissions but it could also be the leading ‘carbon farming’ industry if it changes its ways. . .


Royal Show to go

May 1, 2009

If the Canterbury A&P Show was under threat, agriculture in New Zealand would be in a very sorry state.

What then does the demise of the Royal Show at Stoneleigh in Warwickshire say about the state of agriculture in Britain?

If the collapse of Lehman Brothers and the fire-sale of Merrill Lynch were powerful symbols of the end of the City as we had come to know it, then the demise of the Royal Show, the premier farming event of the British calendar at Stoneleigh in Warwickshire, is a totem of the end of our countryside.

A&P Shows in New Zealand had some pretty lean years in the wake of the 80s’ ag-sag but most have done better in recent years, partly as a result of better farm incomes but also by adapting to attract urban people with little or no knowledge of , or interest in, farming.

Fortunately not all British Shows are under threat and those which are thriving:

. . . aren’t anymore about red-faced, burly farmers looking for a new bull and horny-handed sons of toil trading harrows. . .  They have an obligation, if they are to survive, to entertain as well as to trade. And, sad as it may be for those who have farmed the land for generations, that is a rubric for the countryside itself.

If farming is in terminal decline . . . then other uses for the countryside have to be developed and encouraged, beyond building new homes across swathes of it. And that requires both imagination and a new covenant between town and country.

As matters stand, the two are more estranged than ever. . . The new appointment of the South Downs as a National Park only serves to show how the Government believes that rural beauty is to be corralled, rather than integrated in to the rest of our economy. As a nation, we need to decide what we want from our countryside.

They also need to decide how much they’re prepared to pay for it. Farming certainly isn’t in terminal decline in New Zealand and is probably better placed than other sectors to withstand the recession. One of the reasons for that is that we were forced to enter the real world in the 1980s in contrast to our British counterparts who are still dependent on subsidies and find they and their incomes are governed by political whim rather than their markets.

But although we’re standing on our own feet there are still people and groups with strong views on what they want from and for our countryside and who want to tell us what to do and how to do it.

There is some comfort in the knowledge that the government has a better understanding and appreciation of farming than the previous one because here, as in Britain,  farmers are very much a minority and the rural-urban gap is very wide.

That’s one of the reasons that A&P shows are important, not only are they a  measure of how farming is doing, they’re also a plank on bridge between town and country.


Smiles at the show

November 14, 2008

The sun was shining on the Christchurch show yesterday and people were beaming too.

The weather’s dry, the outlook for commodities is uncertain and the clouds hovering over the domestic and globabl economies are darkening, any or all of which could be reason for gloomy faces.

But the government has changed and when the election came up in conversation, as it inevitably did, that made everyone we talked to smile, and the biggest smiles of all were at the National Party tent.


%d bloggers like this: