Rural round-up

30/08/2016

Pet theories don’t make water safer:

Federated Farmers urges the public to apply some good old-fashioned common sense and scrutinice the statements of activists as they push their anti-farming agendas in the wake of the Havelock North water-borne gastrointestinal disease outbreak.

Top of the list would be Dr Mike Joy’s statements on The Nation last Sunday where he said:

“’Central and local government had allowed massive intensification [of dairying] that had caused the problem’ when in fact the closest dairy farm we can find is some 40 kilometres away”, Federated Farmers president Dr William Rolleston says.

Or his statement that “animals have to come out of agriculture”.

“The sanity of this statement for New Zealand can stand on its own merits.

“In the context of this bacterial episode he said that ‘over time you find it deeper and deeper and deeper [in the groundwater]’ when it is known that as water penetrates the ground, bacteria are progressively filtered out and their survival diminishes.” . . .

GoodYarn mental health scheme award winner – Sally Rae:

A rural mental health initiative developed by WellSouth has received international recognition.

WellSouth’s health promotion team was named joint winner of best mental health promotion/mental illness prevention at the Australia and New Zealand Mental Health Services Conference in Auckland for its GoodYarn programme.

GoodYarn was developed specifically for farming communities to increase awareness of the signs and symptoms of stress and mental illness, to give people the confidence to talk with someone when they were concerned, and to know where to get help. . . 

Farmers: we will fight for livelihoods – Tim Miller:

Farmers in Tarras are prepared to go all the way to the Environment Court to protect their livelihoods.

Members of the Lindis Catchment Group voted at a meeting in Tarras last night to  appeal the Otago Regional Council’s decision to set a minimum flow rate for the Lindis River catchment at 900 litres per second from October 1 to May 31 every year.

Committee member and local farmer Bruce Jolly said 26 members of the catchment group voted unanimously in favour of appealing the decision. . . 

 

Cattle theft would’ve need 10 trucks – Federated farmers:

A possible theft of 500 dairy cows from a Canterbury farm has stumped police investigating their disappearance.

Pennie Ormsby-Saunders told Newshub she has a herd of 1300 cows but last week noticed more than a third of them were missing.

Rick Powdrell from Federated Farmers says stock thefts are a concerning trend.

“In recent times there’ve been a number of thefts in that area. Now whether these are connected, we don’t know. . . 

Stand built for world champs – Sally Rae:

Four South Otago men will have little time to admire their handiwork when the world’s best shearers and woolhandlers converge on Invercargill next year.

Since May, Otago Shears committee members Bruce Walker, Ken Payne, Neville Leslie and Geoff Finch have spent 130 hours preparing the shearing stand for the Golden Shears World Shearing and Woolhandling championships.

About 4500 sheep will be shorn by competitors from about 30 countries at ILT Stadium Southland from February 9 to 11. . . 

US ag exports expected to rise by $6 billion in 2017:

US agricultural exports are expected to rise in 2017 from 2016 levels, largely due to higher exports of oilseeds and products, horticultural products, cotton, and livestock, dairy, and poultry.

According to the latest Outlook for US Agricultural Trade Report from the US Department of Agriculture’s Economic Research Service and Foreign Agricultural Service, agricultural exports in fiscal year 2017 are projected at $133.0 billion, up $6.0 billion from the revised fiscal 2016 forecast of $127.0 billion.

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said: “These numbers once again demonstrate the resiliency and reliability of US farmers and ranchers in the face of continued challenges. . . 


Rural round-up

28/08/2011

There is a possibility that only people who come from farms will find this amusing – Laughy Kate:

I was having a drink with an old friend who was in town the other day. Today he’s a successful cameraman/producer with awards coming out his ears, but he started out earning a crust as a farm hand and a fencer before picking up a camera. And every once and a while we get reminded of this . . .

Rural women learn crucial skills – Jon Morgan:

As a farmer’s wife on rugged hill country near Taihape, raising three boys and involved with schools and the local community over the past 20 years, Nicki Duncan has had a busy life.

But always, niggling away at the back of her mind, has been a feeling of unfinished business.

She was brought up in Christchurch, the daughter of Pyne Gould Guinness trading director John Paterson, and after completing a commerce degree in Japanese and marketing worked in Japan teaching English and promoting New Zealand lamb.

First intake passes leadership scheme – Sally Rae:

Christine Angland encourages other women to become involved with the Agri-Women’s Development Trust’s Escalator course.

Mrs Angland, from Waipori Station, along with Dawn Sangster (Maniototo) and Andrea Shore (Clydevale), were among the 11 graduates of the inaugural programme which was aimed at developing rural leadership and governance skills in women . . .

Green Party’s irrigation charge policy ‘crazy’ ‘a joke’ – Lynda Van Kempen:

 The Green Party’s plans to charge for irrigation water would be a death blow for Central Otago if implemented, a farming accountant said yesterday.

Alexandra-based Ibbotson Cooney accountant George Collier said the Greens’ policy was “crazy”, while Central Otago Mayor and irrigation scheme manager Tony Lepper described it as “a joke”. . .

Cow pacifier benefits worth rising early to crow about – Sally Rae:

Some mornings, John Brown gets up at 5am to head out to North Otago dairy farms to demonstrate a tool to calm cattle.

Nothing unusual about that except, at 87, Mr Brown could be entitled to stay in bed a little longer. But he is passionate about the product . . .

Tour of UK proud time for shearer – Sally Rae:

Managing the New Zealand shearing team on its recent UK tour was a proud occasion for veteran South Otago shearer Bruce Walker.

Dion King and Rowland Smith, both from the North Island, ended the tour with a series-winning victory over Wales . . .

Converstion key to family succession – Mary Witsey:

Good communication is the key to successful farm succession – that and having a business that’s profitable enough to be passed on.

That was the message about 130 farmers heard at a Beef and Lamb NZ farm succession seminar this month, where a range of specialists outlined ways to hand on the family farm to the next generation . . .

Pioneer of pregnancy scanning –  Kirsty MacNicol:

 The man credited with being one of the first in the world to scan sheep for pregnancy on a commercial basis died this month. KIRSTY MacNICOL looks at the impact Richard Chantler had on farming in the south of New Zealand.

The 1980s in rural New Zealand was a tough time – the impact of Rogernomics and the removal of agricultural subsidies forced farmers to review the way they managed their properties. Animals had to be easy care; farming had to be low cost. To make it work, stock numbers per farmer virtually doubled.

In the sheep industry romney breeders had been the first out of the starting blocks in recognising their sheep had to be genetically more efficient in carrying out their natural functions . . .

Matarangi farms sell at bargain prices – Duncan Bridgeman:

Three farm blocks on the Coromandel Peninsula have been sold at a heavy discount to valuation as bankers try and recover loans to Matarangi properties that were once part of the Hanover (© Copyright Protected – The National Business Review 56) empire.

The three farms on State Highway 25 were owned by subsidiaries of Matarangi Beach Estates, which went into receivership in November 2010 . . .

Top fine wool scoured here – Hugh Stringleman:

What is believed to be the finest bale of wool ever scoured in New Zealand is yet unsold and intending buyers need to have mortgage-sized funding.

The tested 11.4 micron, 122kg greasy bale of microfine Forest Range Merino from Anna Emmerson’s Lindis Ridges property at Mayfield, Canterbury, was scoured last week by Canterbury Woolscourers in Timaru.

Until now, scouring of such valuable wool would have been done in China where almost all of NZ’s Merino goes for processing . . .

Venison and Velvet – quality products in demand – Tony Chaston:

The deer industry as a pastoral option has fallen out of favour for NZ farmers over the last few years with numbers falling from previous heady days when growth was rampant.

But what has been consistent all the way along, is the quality of the two main products and these two articles reinforce the prospects of future demand for this small industry . . .


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