Rural round-up

September 13, 2017

Election stunt doomed to fail – Pam Tipa:

The Greens’ proposed ‘nitrogen tax’ is a vote catching policy which is highly unlikely to see the light of day, says Federated Farmers vice-president and dairy farmer Andrew Hoggard.

However the problem with such an election stunt is that it perpetrates misconceptions, he says.

“The best way of improving waterways where they need to be improved is by a catchment focus basis,” he told Dairy News.

“With the Greens’ policy, they are focusing on just nitrogen and only from one source. If a catchment has an issue with nitrogen you need to focus on it from all sources.

“Nitrogen is not the issue in all catchments; if swimmability is what people are after then it’s E.coli they need to be looking at; sediment may be a big factor.” . . 

Penalize abusers not users of water – Tim Cadogan:

Before I write another word, I need to make two very clear points.

Firstly; I am outraged that New Zealand’s waterways have been degraded over the last decade or two to the point that many are unswimmable and/or devoid of wildlife. This should never have happened and, as a nation, we must work together to fix this.

Secondly; I am apolitical. Any comments I make here in relation to Labour’s proposed irrigation tax/royalty would be made by me whether the idea was coming from Labour, National, Greens or whoever. My job is to stand up, as I see best, for Central Otago, no matter who is on the other side.

On that basis; I wrote a letter to Jacinda Ardern pointing out what I saw as the unfairness of the irrigation tax/royalty as proposed by Labour, but set in a tone of “something needs done”. I stand by the comments I made in that letter. . .

Lamb prices reach record highs – Jemma Brackebush:

Farmers say it’s been a fantastic season for lamb, as a global shortage of the meat is pushing up the prices.

Ewes are being sold with new season lambs, fetching up to $170 at sales.

Chilled export lamb prices have reached historically high levels, with the average price of $14.50 per kg, a 20 percent increase on the year before, according to AgriHQ.

Bright-coloured stock trucks line the streets of Feilding every Friday morning, as sheep and cattle are carted from around the district and brought to the yards, which lie in the centre of town. . .  

The Sunday roast is a ritual of the past – Amy Williams:

You could be forgiven for thinking millennials are to blame for the demise of the Sunday roast and that smashed avocado on toast has replaced a great family tradition.

After all, at almost $5 each, a kilogram of avocados will set you back about the same amount as a leg of lamb. It’s the modern-day equivalent.

The time-honoured tradition of eating a weekly roast meal was alive in New Zealand until at least the 1980s when a cut of fatty lamb was cooked well-done till browned and blackened, accompanied by vegetables cooked in the meaty juices.

But then fat became the enemy and now we’re more aware of our health, our wallets and the environment and, if you’re like me, eating a leg of lamb each week is extravagant for all those reasons. . . 

No farms, no food, no future.

Blue cod catch limit discussed – Hamish MacLean:

Recreational bag limits for blue cod are some of the most liberal in the country off the Dunedin and North Otago coasts — and they could be about to drop.

At the weekend, up to 140 — mostly recreational — fishermen attended two drop-in sessions hosted by the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), in Dunedin and Moeraki, in the first stage of public consultation on its proposed national strategy for the native fish. A further 800 people had filled in the online survey, MPI Dunedin team manager Allen Frazer said.

There was a queue to get into  the building at 1pm on Sunday at  Coronation Hall, in Moeraki. . .

Town’s bid to be dark sky community – Jono Edwards:

Naseby’s residents have stars in their eyes as the village edges closer to becoming New Zealand’s first internationally recognised Dark Sky Community.

Naseby Vision plans to submit its application to the International Dark-Sky Association in December, after about a year of planning.

To support the bid, the Maniototo Community Board last week decided to officially endorse the project.

Naseby Vision chairman John Crawford said this was an important and necessary step.

“The mayor has written a letter of support and some other groups are doing the same. We’ve got to show the wider community is on board.” . . 

Predator Free 2050 Ltd on the hunt to fund bold conservation projects:

 New Zealand conservation groups committed to broad scale predator eradication are encouraged to lodge an expression of interest for funding and support from Predator Free 2050 Ltd.

The organisation – tasked with eradicating possums, rats and stoats from New Zealand by 2050 is seeking Expressions of Interest from regional and local councils, community organisations, mana whenua, businesses, Non-Governmental Organisations and other entities capable of delivering eradication initiatives in line with its 2025 goals.

The 2025 goals include enlarging target predator suppression to an additional one million hectares of mainland New Zealand, eradicating predators from at least 20,000 hectares of mainland New Zealand without the use of fences, eradicating all predators from New Zealand’s island nature reserves and achieving a breakthrough science solution capable of eradicating at least one small mammalian predator from the mainland. . . 

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366 days of gratitude

April 14, 2016

I used to not like fish.

What changed me was trout caught in Lake Taupo and barbecued soon after. My conversion was complete when I was treated to fresh-caught hapuka  from off the coast of Waimarama and Great Mercury Island.

Those experiences with fresh fish, which has such a delicate taste, made me realise that what I’d had before that the strong fishy taste that had put me off fish, can’t have been fresh.

Oxymoronic as it seems, fresh fish doesn’t taste fishy.

Fish bought from a shop can never be as fresh as that cooked straight from the lake or sea but we can usually get blue cod which is nearly as good.

That’s what we had for dinner tonight, baked with a topping of olives, sun-dried tomatoes, parsley and a squeeze of lemon juice.

It was not at all fishy and I’m grateful for that.


Rural round-up

December 20, 2012

Dead cows suffered urea poisoning:

The deaths of a 120 cows on a south Taranaki farm was a large-scale, one-off accident, caused by urea poisoning, a vet has confirmed.

The cows, which made up about a quarter of the farmers’ herd, died suddenly earlier this month, after their water troughs had been topped up using a portable tank.

Within 30 minutes, cows began falling to the ground. Vets were called immediately, but there was little they could do as some of the cows died quickly.

Taranaki Veterinary Centre chief executive Stephen Hopkinson says the cows suffered urea poisoning.

He told NZ Newswire the portable tank used to fill up the water troughs had also been used to spray pastures with urea.

Though it was rinsed in between uses, there was still enough urea left in the bottom of the tank to poison the cows. . .

Smedley Station invites Lincoln University to join them in producing the ‘very best future farmers’:

North Island-based Smedley Station and Cadet Training Farm has initiated a partnership agreement with Lincoln University to form a unique on-farm education and training offering for young farmers.
 
Smedley Station is located in the central Hawkes Bay, 40kms west of Waipukurau, and the 5,000ha (30,000 stock unit) property offers two-year, intensive on-farm training and experience for 22 cadets.   Smedley’s Board Chairman, Pat Portas, is delighted that the two like-minded training institutions have formed a partnership to work together: “Smedley’s vision is ‘developing the very best future farmers’.  For an individual to become one of the best farmers they need to have a well-rounded education, including both practical work and theory.   Smedley Station has traditionally been providing excellent on-farm practical training and the partnership with Lincoln University will now enable the delivery of the best land-based theory New Zealand has to offer.  Our cadets will finish their time here with all-round practical skills and having had the potential to study right through to Level 5 with the University”. . . 

Foresters growing less pruned wood:

Forest owners are moving away from production of pruned logs, says the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI).

MPI has released the 2012 annual National Exotic Forestry Description (NEFD) report, which gives a snapshot of the area and make-up of New Zealand’s planted production forests. . .

Stay safe on the farm this summer:

On average, 850 people each year are injured riding quad bikes on farms. Five die.

It is because of these unacceptable statistics that Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment inspectors will visit farms this summer to ensure key quad bike safety steps are recognised and understood.

Rural Women New Zealand joins the Ministry in urging farmers and their families to take extra care on the farm over summer, particularly when it comes to quad bike safety.

As it gets closer to the holiday season the pace of work picks up and more tasks are fitted into the longer days. . .

Canterbury Earthquake Awards recognises the Farmy Army

Key members of Federated Farmers’ Farmy Army were recognised last evening at the Canterbury Earthquake Awards.

“The individual recognition received was a well deserved tribute for their selfless contribution and commitment,” says John Hartnell, Federated Farmers Bees Chairperson and ‘Generalissimo’ of Federated Farmers’ Farmy Army.

“The five ‘Farmy Army’ people recognised last night accepted their awards really on behalf of the thousands who pitched in to help Christchurch. . .

Prevention best protection for facial eczema risk:

Reports that farm revenue is not matching increases to input costs mean farmers need to be acutely focused on maximising production.

Altum Animal Nutrition Manager Jackie Aveling says warmer temperatures and higher humidity are a sign that summer is finally here, but they also signal the potential for facial eczema.

“Dairy and beef cattle, sheep, deer and goats are all susceptible. For dairy farmers in particular, facial eczema can put a real brake on production when they are aiming to make the most of reasonable growing conditions at a time when peak production can taper off,” says Mrs Aveling. . .

Marlborough Sounds Blue Cod Fishery Opening For Summer:

The Ministry for Primary Industries is calling on recreational fishers to know the rules when they go fishing for blue cod in Marlborough this summer.

District Compliance Manager Manager Ian Bright said Fishery Officers would be out and about making sure recreational fishers follow the rules. . .

And from World Angus Forum:

angus


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