NZ Covid resilience high but low access to vaccine

26/11/2020

Bloomberg has ranked 53 countries’ Covid-19 resilience:

Bloomberg crunched the numbers to determine the best places to be in the coronavirus era: where has the virus been handled most effectively with the least amount of disruption to business and society? . . .

The Covid Resilience Ranking scores economies of more than $200 billion on 10 key metrics: from growth in virus cases to the overall mortality rate, testing capabilities and the vaccine supply agreements places have forged. The capacity of the local health-care system, the impact of virus-related restrictions like lockdowns on the economy, and citizens’ freedom of movement are also taken into account. . . 

 

Effective testing and tracing is a hallmark of almost all the top 10, embodied in South Korea’s approach. The country approved home-grown diagnostic kits within weeks of the virus’s emergence, pioneered drive-through testing stations and has an army of lightning-fast contact tracers who comb through credit card records and surveillance camera footage to track down clusters. Like Japan, Pakistan and other parts of Asia, Korea has drawn on recent epidemic experience after suffering an outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, in 2015. . . 

The under-performance of some of the world’s most prominent democracies including the U.S., U.K. and India contrasted with the success of authoritarian countries like China and Vietnam has raised questions over whether democratic societies are cut out for tackling pandemics.

Bloomberg’s Covid Resilience Ranking tells a different story: eight of the top 10 are democracies. Success in containing Covid-19 with the least disruption appears to rely less on being able to order people into submission, but on governments engendering a high degree of trust and societal compliance. . . 

The result is an overall score that’s a snapshot of how the pandemic is playing out in these 53 places right now. By ranking their access to a coronavirus vaccine, we also provide a window into how these economies’ fortunes may shift in the future. It’s not a final verdict, nor could it ever be with imperfections in virus data and the fast pace of this crisis, which has seen subsequent waves confound places that handled things well the first time around. Circumstance and pure luck also play a role, but are hard to quantify.

The Ranking will change as countries switch up their strategies, the weather shifts and the race intensifies for a viable inoculation. Still, the gap that has opened up between those economies at the top and those at the bottom is likely to endure, with potentially lasting consequences in the post-Covid world. . . 

Although the USA ranks poorly for case numbers and fatalities it ranks highly for access to vaccine which brings its resilience ranking up.

New Zealand tops the list and has done well with relatively few cases and fatalities but has a lower ranking (2/5) for for access to vaccines.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern says we’ll need a ‘certain’ level of herd immunity before our borders open:

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has revealed New Zealand will need to have a certain level of Covid-19 herd immunity before border restrictions are significantly altered.

But that may still be a long way off – the Minister of Covid-19 Response Chris Hipkins said some travel restrictions would likely remain in place for another 12 to 18 months. . . 

‘Certain’ must mean quite high which will require widespread access to publicly funded vaccines.

No-one is suggesting the government will force anyone to have a vaccine, but governments, and businesses, can restrict access to people who don’t get vaccinated. Qantus has already announced it will require people to be vaccinated before they fly.

People will have the freedom to refuse a vaccination but those who do will find their freedom to travel is restricted.

 


Rural round-up

12/03/2015

Extra controls on 1080:

The Government has introduced tighter controls on high purity forms of 1080 in response to the criminal threat to use 1080 to contaminate infant and other formula, Environment Minister Dr Nick Smith announced today.

“I am satisfied that the controls for 1080 in the Hazardous Substances and New Organisms (HSNO) Act are robust, but with this criminal threat we are putting in place extra controls,” Dr Smith says.

High purity 1080 is highly toxic. It is mainly used for the manufacture of pest control baits, but small quantities are also used for research.

“The current regulations have an exemption for research laboratory use, as is the case for dozens of similarly toxic substances. This threat justifies putting in place additional controls that will require tighter security of high purity 1080 in laboratories, tracking of the quantity of the poison stored and used, and requiring Environmental Protection Authority certification of importers of high purity 1080 into New Zealand,” Dr Smith says. . .

Fears for 1080 milk scare repercussions

There are real fears about the knock-on effect to our dairy industry as the story about the 1080 milk powder threat makes news around the world.

Financial news service Bloomberg reported New Zealand’s clean, safe reputation is at risk, while the New York Times wrote our market has shuddered at the threat.

Reuters and the BBC also pointed to the potential economic fallout.

China remains our biggest market for milk powder, buying one-third of our dairy exports, but the news hasn’t made their front page headlines yet. . .

Game Animal Condemns 1080 Threat

“The Game Animal Council condemns attempts to blackmail New Zealand into stopping the use of 1080 poison” said Don Hammond, Chairman of the New Zealand Game Animal Council.

The use of 1080 poison has been controversial throughout its history with many groups and individuals being opposed to its use. There has been a significant increase in its use over the last year largely due to the Battle for our Birds programme. . .

Maori orchard success story:

Maori Trustee Te Tumu Paeroa says the success of a kiwifruit orchard on the East Coast is an example of how small blocks of Maori-owned land can be utilised to provide jobs and make a profit.

The Hamama Orchard, owned by Te Kaha 14B2 Trustees, recently won the PGG Wrightson Land and Life Award for commitment to people, community and passion for sustainable practice.

The Maori Trustee oversees the governance and management of the orchard. . .

Emphatic Winners in Northland Dairy Awards:

The 2015 Northland Sharemilker/Equity Farmers of the Year, Brad and Lesley Roberts, were emphatic winners – claiming the title along with six of nine merit awards on offer.

“I don’t think anyone was surprised when they were named the winners at the end of the night, as the merit awards proved they are very strong across all areas of their farm business,” Northland regional managers Ian Douglas and Rowena Butterworth-Boord said.

Brad and Lesley Roberts won $8500 in prizes at the 2015 Northland Dairy Industry Awards held at Toll Stadium in Whangarei last night . The other big winners were Karla Frost, who won the 2015 Northland Farm Manager of the Year contest, and Mike Jensen, the region’s 2015 Dairy Trainee of the Year. . .

Alps to Ocean cycleway put to test – Hamish Clark:

My ankle is sore, thighs are still burning and bumasaraus. Did I think the Alps 2 Ocean cycle ride would be easy? Yes. Was it easy? Yes and no. The hills got me every time.

I did it – me and seven other mad mates.

Five days – 301km – from Mt Cook to Oamaru – the destination was always to get to the sea, but it was the journey along the way that was the real highlight.

The Alps 2 Ocean cycle trail goes from New Zealand’s highest Mountain – Aoraki Mt Cook – past great lakes and rivers and down to the ocean. . .

 Big Fat Hen Marmalade Making Company produce great tasting home grown marmalade:

Formed in 2015, Heather’s Big Fat Hen Marmalade Making Company is New Zealand newest high quality marmalade company.

The knowledgeable and friendly team behind Heathers Big Fat Hen Marmalade Making Company, have a tradition of supplying the best quality jams and marmalades to the top hotels in New Zealand since last century.

These high-profile hotels include the Langham, Stamford, Millbrook and international flights out of New Zealand. . .

 

 


Quote of the week

27/08/2010

“We in the Labour Party have a serious problem with John Key,” says Moore, who this month became New Zealand’s ambassador to the U.S. “He’s a very hard man to hate.”

Mike Moore in a Bloomberg interview.


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