366 days of gratitude

March 26, 2018

The Black Caps won the cricket test against England by an innings and 49 runs.

What’s more the team did it without cheating and I’m very grateful for that.


Quote of the day

March 31, 2015

The greatest legacy one can pass on to one’s children and grandchildren is not money or other material things accumulated in one’s life, but rather a legacy of character and faith. – Billy Graham

This choice was inspired by:

Brendan Malone’s  Son, your character is more important than legal action:

. . . I love my son more than life itself, but, if years from now, when he is in high school, he should ring me one day and tell me that he is being sent home from a very important school sports trip because he has made a bad decision and broken the law, I will not take legal action to help him avoid the consequences of what he has done.

I will undoubtedly feel greatly disappointed for him, and probably very angry about any personal time or financial investment that is about to be lost by my wife and I as a result of him being sent home from the competition.

But I would also be keenly aware that there is something far more important than just money, time or sporting accolades at stake here, and that I, as his father, need to help him to understand that honour matters, and that sacrificing your integrity to compete in a sporting competition (even if you win) does not make you a winner – it makes you a man without character. . .

And:

Jonny Gilling’s Open letter to the Black Caps: I can point to you and say to my sons, ‘live like that’ :

. . The simple reality is that fame is a cheating lover. Give it a generation or two and very few people will recall your names or your achievements.

Perhaps the cricket die-hards will, there will no doubt be a plaque or two somewhere acknowledging what you have achieved. But the world is too small a place to remember the sporting deeds of many and each generation moves on to its own heroes.

What will live on is character passed from parent to child, honour imparted and stewarded into maturity by a community to a young one. What will live on are the qualities that can exist in a human heart that steward the very life of humanity.

And so I say thank you.

Thank you for taking your global stage and as a unified team, displaying something more valuable than holding aloft a trophy.

To New Zealand cricket, keep walking the path that you have started on. While you did not win the game, where honour and integrity are evident, you can never fail. I believe if you continue on in this manner, the trophies will come.

I know that given the hopes you had as a team, a letter from an unknown nobody will probably mean very little right now. However, life has a funny way of taking what we once thought was an incredible achievement, and with expanded and matured sight, life proves what we thought to be incredible is actually fairly insignificant.

It is for that reason that I hope each of you go forward to live the kind of lives where one day, perhaps months, years or decades from now, you read this letter again and recognise how invaluable it is to display honour, humility, character and compassion for the world to see.

As a father seeking to reveal to them the beauty of his sons, thank you.

And:


Good sports

March 28, 2015

Sambit Bal writes:

The difference between New Zealand and South Africa in Auckland was a matter of moments: fleeting minutes that laid bare the fickle beauty and cruelty of sport.

Without the knowledge and experience of pain, the pleasures of sport will never feel truly sweet. And because sport provides such incredible highs, it must also be accompanied by corresponding lows – with every triumph must come heartbreak. And when a match goes down to the wire like this heart-stopper between New Zealand and South Africa did, when one ball or one shot in the last over decides who goes to the World Cup final, these emotions are that much more profound: they can last a lifetime. . .

It is worth reading in full and shows both New Zealand’s Black Caps and South Africa’s Proteas as very good sports.

 


NZ’s in the final

March 24, 2015

What a game!

South Africa
281/5 (43) Live
New Zealand
288/6 (42.2)

Who said cricket is boring?

February 28, 2015

What a game:

Australia 151: New Zealand 152/9.

Phew!

 


Blackcaps beat England by 8 wickets

February 20, 2015

What a win!

England 123 all out after 33.2 overs (Joe Root 46, Tim Southee 7-33, Daniel 1-19) lost to New Zealand 125-2 in 12.2 overs  (Brendon McCullum 77, Martin Guptill 22) by eight wickets  at Westpac Stadium in Wellington.

Tim Southee was in a class of his own today, producing New Zealand’s best figures in ODI history to bowl England out for 123 in the crucial ICC Cricket World Cup 2015 fixture in Wellington. The skipper added to Southee’s record breaking bowling effort with the fastest half century in the history of the ICC Cricket World Cup from only 18 balls.

McCullum ended with 77 from only 25 balls, to lead the home side to 124-2 and chase down the English total in the 13th over. It was the first time that Westpac Stadium was a full house for a cricket match – a total crowd of over 30,000. . . 

This is where I have to confess I’m a fair-weather cricket fan – but I’m really enjoying the start to this World Cup campaign.

 

 


It’s a draw!

January 25, 2014

Who said cricket was boring?

10.15pm – India draw to keep series alive

Ravindra Jadeja hits a single on the last ball to draw level with the Black Caps and keep the series alive with two matches left to play.

New Zealand had some bad luck in the final overs but India refused to lie down and fought back to achieve what seemed impossible.

Thrilling finish to a fantastic game. . .

Just wondering if any New Zealander thought it might have been cricket to bowl the last ball underarm?


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