Rural round-up

07/06/2017

Time to give farmers their due – Dr William Rolleston:

It is election year and it seems that for the environmental groups the gloves are off.

We have seen Greenpeace run a series of fundraising ads vilifying dairy farmers and Forest and Bird pull out of the Land and Water Forum. No surprise that both these organisations are headed by ex-Green politicians. Scuttlebutt is that Forest and Bird will re-join the Land and Water Forum after the election. Greenpeace has yet again been accused of misleading the public.

The truth is that farmers are fully engaged in meeting their environmental responsibilities. Up and down the country I have seen catchment groups working to reduce their impact on water quality and address issues of water allocation. . . 

Queen’s Birthday Honours: James Guild:

James Alastair Hay Guild, of High Peak Station, Darfield, has been made a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit for services to the deer industry.

Mr Guild is a farmer and tourism operator who has been active in the deer industry for more than forty years.

Mr Guild has been a councillor and President of New Zealand Deer Farmers Association, Director of the Game Industry Board, Director of the Cervena Trust, inaugural Chair of Provelco Co-op Ltd, President of the New Zealand Association of Game Estates, and chaired the organising committee of first World Deer Congress. . .

People at the heart of decades of work for Flaxmere’s new MNZM:

Its third time lucky for the humble Peter MacGregor, who has been made a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit for his services to Maori and agriculture.

The Flaxmere resident said he felt very honoured to have received the Queens Birthday Honour.

This was not the first time Mr MacGregor had been recognised in such a way – he said he had declined the Queens Birthday honours the first time “some years ago”, and the second time the required paperwork was not completed in time. . . 

Saving seed in case :

AgResearch has deposited a collection of seeds in a remote Arctic doomsday vault to guard against the loss of plant species through war, disease or disaster striking New Zealand.

The deposit was made via an airmailed package to the Svalbard Global Seed Vault, a secure facility on the rugged Arctic Svalbard archipelago between mainland Norway and the North Pole.

It is the second delivery of its kind from AgResearch’s Margot Forde Germplasm Centre (MFGC) following an agreement established last year. . .

Socks of many colours for resthome residents – Sally Brooker:

For its 40th anniversary, the Black and Coloured Sheep Breeders’ Association of New Zealand continued its tradition of charitable works.

The association held its annual conference in Oamaru, bringing in more than 50 delegates from across the country. As well as attending meetings and competing with their coloured fleeces, sheepskins, handcrafts and photography, they made time to donate woollen goods to a local rest-home. . . .

Fieldays’ Rural Bachelor competition is back:

Rest easy, New Zealand, the Fieldays Rural Bachelor of the Year finalists have been found.

Fieldays staff have been scouring New Zealand and Australia in search of the eight most eligible rural bachelors, and they have finally found this year’s stock. The blokes will soon be embarking on a whirlwind week as they vie for the title of Rural Bachelor of the Year, a prize pack worth over $20,000 and a chance at finding love.

Rural Bachelor event manager Lynn Robinson said selecting the finalists was a tough job. . .

 

 


Rural round-up

04/05/2017

$30m Maori investment in kiwifruit – Pam Tipa:

$30 MILLION will be invested in building 10 kiwifruit orchards on Maori land in the Bay of Plenty and Gisborne over the next 18 months, says entrepreneur Te Tumu Pairoa, in partnership with Quayside Holdings.
In the single-largest kiwifruit investment ever made on Maori land, at least 90ha of semi- and unproductive land will be converted into grower businesses.

Te Tumu Paeroa has developed a unique model for the enterprises, to allow full ownership of the orchards to transfer to landowners in an estimated 12-17 years after achieving a targeted rate of return on capital invested. . .

Young auctioneer takes on Australia:

Twenty-two year old Kurow man Madison Taylor had a busy week at the Sydney Royal Easter Show recently — not only was he representing New Zealand as a bareback rodeo rider, he was also representing his country as New Zealand’s top young auctioneer.

Taylor won the Heartland Bank Young Auctioneer of the Year title at the Canterbury A&P Show in November.

Part of his prize was a trip to Sydney to get involved with the Australian Livestock and Property Agents Association’s equivalent competition at the Royal Show. . .

Meat exports to fall this season – Hugh Stringleman:

The Beef + Lamb New Zealand Economic Service has forecast 2-3% reductions in lamb and beef export revenue this season despite rising world prices.

The meat processing season was well advanced and the recent rises in prices would not bring out any more livestock for slaughter or boost the season-long revenues above those of last year.

Lamb revenue for 2016-17 was forecast to be $2.53 billion, down 2.1% from the previous season. . .

Sheep and beef profit up 12% – Hugh Stringleman:

A 12% increase in sheep and beef farm profit expectations because of good livestock feeding conditions and higher lamb and beef prices is being forecast by Beef + Lamb New Zealand’s Economic Service.

It published a mid-season update for 2016-17 incorporating its predictions for the season as a whole in lamb, beef, wool and the average sheep and beef farm accounts. . .

Ploughing expertise put to the test – Alexia Johnston:

Dedicated ploughers will be eyeing up a place on the national stage when the next New Zealand Ploughing Championships qualifying event takes place in Timaru.
The top performers will compete in the nationals at Thornbury next year.

But first, they must perfect the art of creating straight furrows on a local level.

To do that, contestants will compete in one or more of four classes atthe Timaru event — conventional ploughing, reversible ploughing, vintage ploughing and horse ploughing. . .

Sheep breeding just one talent – Sally Rae;

Stuart Albrey is a man of many talents.
He’s a sheep-breeding, gymnastics-coaching school teacher who is also handy with a pair of knitting needles and a spinning wheel.

”I’d do brain surgery if they’d let me. I’d put my hand to anything,” he quipped during the Black and Coloured Sheep Breeders Association of New Zealand’s conference in Oamaru last week.

Mr Albrey and his wife Sue have 450 Polwarth, merino, Romney and Corriedale sheep on their property at Arno, near Waimate, of which about one-quarter are white. . .

Bridging the urban-country divide:

Seven city teenagers – from Riccarton, Hillmorton and Cashmere High Schools in Christchurch – last week got a taste of ‘life on the land’, spending a week with four farming families in the Central, Mid and South Canterbury regions.

The visit was part of an innovative Farm Experience (FX) Program, developed by agribusiness banking specialist Rabobank to help bridge the ‘urban/rural divide’, giving city teenagers the opportunity to spend a week on-farm, living with a farming family and learning about life on the land and food production.

This was the first FX Program to be held in New Zealand. . .

 


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