Rural round-up

08/08/2015

Removal of subsidies and tariffs to boost NZ farm incomes – econfix: (Hat tip: Utopia)

With most of the attention has been focused on the TPP the 161 countries of the World Trade Organisation had set a deadline of the end of July to agree on a “work programme” to substantially complete the Doha round of global trade talks later this year.

Launched in 2001, the Doha round was to pick up where the Uruguay round of global trade liberalisation left off six years earlier. The deadlock in negotiations is ultimately down to a belief that the EU and the US and the large developing countries of China, Brazil and India have each given up more than its fair share in liberalising agricultural trade and the other side should do more. . .

Canterbury dairy farms facing big bills as milk payout crashes:

South Canterbury farmer Ben Jaunay is “farming for free” and facing losing hundreds of thousands of dollars if milk prices keep falling.

Banks are tipping dairy giant Fonterra’s payout for its latest financial year to go below $4 a kilogram. The value of whole milk powder dropped sharply at Fonterra’s global commodity auction this week, increasing fears for its payout forecast on Friday.

Jaunay manages more than 3000 cows on two properties near Timaru.  . .  

Collaboration Paying Off For New Zealand’s Avocado Industry:

Plans to quadruple sales of New Zealand avocados by 2023 is off to a roaring start with the industry almost hitting the half way mark last season with a record 7.1m trays worth $135m harvested during 2014-15 season.

Chief Executive of NZ Avocado, Jen Scoular, says the goal is to achieve $280m worth of sales by 2023 through a five year Primary Growth Partnership (PGP) programme with the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI).

“Confidence is riding high, and the industry is on track to achieve the PGP objectives and significantly boost avocado sales and productivity in less than ten years,” says Scoular. . .

 Russian ‘food crematoria’ provoke outrage amid crisis:

Russian government plans for mass destruction of banned Western food imports have provoked outrage in a country where poverty rates are soaring and memories remainof famine during Soviet times.

Even some Kremlin allies are expressing shock at the idea of “food crematoria” while one Orthodox priest has denounced the campaign, which officially began on Thursday, as insane and sinful. However, the authorities are determined to press on with destroying illegal imports they consider “a security threat”. . .

Pipfruit industry continues to ripen:

The boom behind the apple industry’s growth in recent years is being put down to new export markets and varieties.

Apple exports were worth more than $530 million in 2014, and the industry has a goal to reach $1 billion by 2022.

Ministry for Primary Industries chief assurance strategy officer Bill Jolly told the pipfruit industry conference in Wellington the industry’s growth was finally looking rosy.

“For ten years, we sort of stuck around that $320-360m mark, and then suddenly we got a real jump in 2012, and you guys have been going great guns ever since. The growth in this industry has been absolutely spectacular.” . .

Big increase in rural broadband for Wellington region:

Communications Minister Amy Adams says nearly 10,500 homes, workplaces and schools in rural parts of Wellington now have access to faster, more reliable broadband.

The latest results for the Government’s Rural Broadband Initiative (RBI) as at 30 June 2015 were released today.

“By 2016, 90 per cent of New Zealand homes and businesses outside the Ultra-Fast Broadband phase one footprint will have access to better broadband,” Ms Adams says. . .

 

New certification scheme for dairy farm systems consultants:

A certification scheme designed to give farmers confidence in the quality and standard of the advice they receive from their dairy farm systems consultants was launched today at the New Zealand Institute for Primary Industries Management (NZIPIM) national conference in Ashburton.

Development of the scheme has involved a collaborative partnership between DairyNZ, leading dairy farm systems consultants, and NZIPIM, who will continue to be involved in developing and testing the scheme’s assessment tools and associated training to ensure the material is kept current and relevant to the profession. . .

 

 


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