Did you see the one about . . .

February 17, 2010

Lessons in healthcare from Edinburgh Zoo – Theodore Dalrymple at Pyjamas Media (hat tip: Skeptical Doctor).

Looking at Ohariu {5} Vote Splitting – one of a series of posts at BK Drinkwater which show why Peter Dunne should retire gracefully before the next election. Links to the previous posts in the series are at the bottom of the post.

Getting people off benefits – Big News asks: “”how many people come off benefits because they go to prison?”.

Youth rates and Youth Rates Revisited Offsetting Behaviour shows why youth rates cost young people jobs. Kiwiblog has related posts A 10 year high in unemployment  and  Youth rates and youth unemployment.

On Travelling With A Toddler – Bernard Darnton at Not PC serves as a warning to others.

Another Labour Party Bureaucracy and Be happy – that’s an order and Staff Morale – a selection from the series of visual humour at Something Should Go Here.

The Wage Gap – Gooner shows the sorry stas at No Minister.

The Courts must be hellish busy – Lindsay Mitchell has the sorry stats on recidivism.

An interesting course – Kiwblog on law studies at Auckland.

How Not To Run A country – Anti-Dismal on the internet in Iran.

Reflections on media, name suppression etc – Inquiring Mind asks why we should take it any more.

Lactose Intolerant – Macdoctor on homeopathy.

Technology dystopia or utopia – The Visible Hand on technology and labour.


Ever wondered why we have fences?

April 16, 2009

Bernard Darnton explains at Not PC:

Fences make farming possible, promote secure development of land, and encourage Wanaka tourists to remove their bras. They feed us, they enrich us, and they irritate the stuffed shirts at the Queenstown Lakes District Council. What better vision could you facilitate?

And I thought we just used fences to stop the sheep and cattle straying.


Liberal’s mission helps Nats

September 8, 2008

Glenn Jameson has been criticised by some Libertarianz for working for the National Party election campaign.

His response is:

I have a single-minded objective: to help bring an end to the most corrupt government New Zealand has ever seen. . .

That she [Helen Clark] said this without blushing demonstrates just how deep the corruption has seeped. She sees no vice in stealing money from the taxpayer to fund an 11th hour campaign that saw her retain power by the narrowest of majorities. She has justified within herself the bullying of the judiciary to drop charges on a prima facie case of the public money. She sleeps soundly at night in the knowledge that she took the unprecedented step to rewrite the law to make the aforementioned theft legal so as to avoid being taken to court by Libertarianz leader Bernard Darnton.

Two years later her government followed up this Mugabean act with the EFA, singularly the most draconian, anti-freedom legislation ever written in New Zealand: the act that works to dissolve the first and last right of a citizenry in a civilised country – that is, the right to criticise one’s government.

When I took the role on the marketing team for the National Party I knew I’d have to suffer the enmity of most of you here. I also knew I’d be roundly criticised by my peers for a campaign that was always going to have fewer teeth than its predecessor. I don’t blame Cresswell & Co. for their mockery, outrage and sense of betrayal; they will never see the light that exists between National and a party that is truly corrupt.

I want to see the restoration of free and fair elections in New Zealand, and since Helen Clark refuses to step down for the good of her country I’m doing everything in my power to make her. John Key has promised to end the EFA. It’s my job to make sure he has the chance to do so.

There is only one party which can end Clark’s government and that’s National.  Jameson recognises that and has chosen to use his skills to work for National because he wants to defeat Labour.

The comments below his post make entertaining reading.  Some are from people who pride themselves on being liberal but are appalled at he’s exercising his freedom to work for whoever he chooses; others accept his right to do it.

And for those like me who saw the the health billboard and thought, good policy – bad grammar, Jameson explains:

For the record, the line I’d written was “LESS BUREAUCRACY”. They wanted the message to be about fewer bureaucrats. I was overruled on the grammar. The ‘mistake’ was deliberate and all this extra attention it has generated appears to have made the minor embarrassment worth it.


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