28 -27, phew!

June 15, 2014

Dunedin’s Octagon was a sea of black with a very few splashes of red and white before last night’s game.

The sell-out crowd at the Forsyth Barr stadium was also showing its true colours were mostly shades of black.

Before the kick-off the mood was buoyant. The crowd quietened somewhat as England scored the first points and by half-time with the score at 10-6, with the All Blacks behind, there was a fair degree of nervousness.

However, it looked like a different team in the second half and when Ben Smith touched down for his first try as an All Black in front of his home crowd, and put the ABs in front.

He’d been equally as impressive in the first half with sprint half way up the field which ended in a try-saving tackle.

Tries by Ma’a Nonu and Julian Savea followed and with minutes to go the score was 28-27 but England managed a late try.

The All Blacks have already won the three-match series, the Steinlager Cup and the Hillary Shield.

 

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But if this is the second-string English team it was described as before the tour, the All Blacks have a lot of work to do.

They won’t be wasting time admiring the silver-ware, they’ll be preparing for another hard test next week.

And that one won’t be played in nearly as good conditions for the teams, or spectators, as last night’s thanks to the stadium roof.


Celebrating winners counters tall poppy syndrome

July 3, 2011

Fonterra CEO Andrew Ferrier is Federated Farmers Agribusiness Person of the Year.

This is fair recognition of the work he has done in the nearly eight years he’s led the company.

Agri-Personality of the Year  was awarded to John Hartnell and the Farmy Army.

John Hartnell was nominated to recognise his leadership of the ‘Farmy-Army’, which assisted Christchurch’s earthquake recovery from February of this year and again in June.

John was prepared to lead the Federation’s efforts to help the people of urban Christchurch in the recovery phase of the earthquake’s aftermath. In taking on the role as Federated Farmers Earthquake Spokesperson the morning after the earthquake, John worked closely with Civil Defence to understand the immediate needs of Christchurch residents and to identify assistance that would fit with the abilities and enthusiasm of our farmer members.

Over the next two days, John worked closely with a core group of Federated Farmers members to assemble a volunteer group and a base at the A+P Showgrounds. This included a team of support staff, team leaders and cooks. Sponsors were very keen to help in tangible ways, including cash donations, equipment, food and drinks.

The media were inspired by the actions of Federated Farmers and thus, the ‘Farmy Army’ was born.

We all know the efforts and achievements in the four weeks of help given to Christchurch and now, a further week jointly with the Student Volunteer Army.

What has amazed many, are the number of Christchurch people who, upon learning you are a farmer, very quickly and without prompting say, “are you part of the Farmy Army? What a magnificent job”, or “they arrived an cleared my elderly neighbour’s section” and “they cleaned up my driveway when I was away working”, “They were a Godsend”

The actions of the Farmy Army did a tremendous job in breaking down the rural-urban divide with compassion and caring shown by country people; something not so often seen in big cities today.

Most certainly John was assisted by a large team, but his leadership, inspiration and dedication to that team was a pivotal part of the success of the Farmy Army. John’s trademark “hand on the shoulder” is his most genuine was of saying “Thanks, your help is most appreciated”.

Mr Hartnell played tribute in his acceptance to Murray Rowlands, North Canterbury Grain & Seed chairperson, for his leadership during last year’s Canterbury earthquake. Overall, John Hartnell, Commander in Chief of the Farmy Army, is a deserved winner of the 2011 Agri-Personality of the Year on behalf of everyone who volunteered in the Farmy Army.

 Federated Farmers Cream of the Crop awards recognise those who have won various national awards over the past twelve months went to:

New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards Sharemilker / Equity Farmers of the Year – Jason & Lisa Suisted

New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards Sharemilker / Equity Farmers of the Year Federated Farmers Leadership Award – Richard and Joanna Greaves

New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards Farm Manager of the Year -Jason Halford

New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards Dairy Trainee of the Year – Ben Smith

Rural Women New Zealand Enterprising Rural Women Supreme Awards – Lisa Harper

Ahuwhenua Trophy BNZ Māori Excellence in Farming Award – Waipapa 9 Trust (Dawson Haa, Chairman)

NZ Young Farmers National Bank Young Farmer of the Year 2010 – Grant McNaughton

New Zealand Farm Environment Award Trust Ballance Farm Environment Award – Grant and Bernadette Weller.

One way to counter the tall poppy syndrome  is to celebrate winners and this initiative by Federated Farmers does that well.


Ben & Mark Boys of the High Country

September 30, 2009

A generation ago most people who weren’t from farms had friends or family who were.

That is no longer the case and to many city kids, rural New Zealand might as well be another country.

A newly released book, by Christine Fernyhough and John Bougen aims to change that.

Ben & Mark, Boys of the High Country, is the story of the real day to day lives of Ben and Mark Smith of Mount White Station in Canterbury.

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Damming the creek, catching tadpoles and cockabullies, mustering on foot and horse back, helping in the shearing shed or stock yards, and pig hunting are common place for nine year old Ben and eight year old Mark.

Christine’s words and John’s photos portray these and other aspects of high country life for city kids who’ve never been off a tar sealed road.

Christine chooses simple terms to describe Ben and Mark’s activities and the station which is their 40,000 hectare home –  she explains is nearly as big as 60,000 rugby fields put together.

John uses his knowledge of the people and places to good effect in capturing the day to day life and seasonal routines. While the book is about the boys, the photos also highlight the beauty of the land. The blurb on the cover says the photos are stunning, and they are.

Although the book is aimed at children  it will appeal to adults too, whether it’s read from cover to cover or left on the coffee table to be dipped in to.

Ben & Mark Boys of the High Country by Christine Fernyhough and John Bougen. Published by Random House. $36.99.


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