Rural round-up

12/10/2020

Potential animal welfare crisis looming – Sudesh Kissun:

A local vet recruitment agency says the vet shortage situation in the country is getting more dire by the day. 

Julie South, of VetStaff, says that while the Government’s recent decision to let overseas vets into the country for work is a step in the right direction, it’s nowhere near enough to cover the current shortage.

“They need to allow almost ten times that many in to ease the animal welfare and human stress and mental health issues the shortage is causing,” she told Rural News. . .

Hort’s priorities for a newly-elected government – Mike Chapman:

The biggest challenge facing horticulture is labour and we will – as a collective sector – ask the new government to focus attention in this area.

As a result of Covid, many New Zealanders need to develop new skills and take on positions in essential industries such as horticulture – industries that are pivotal to the country’s economic and social recovery.

This is no easy task. The new government will need to complete the reform of the education and training system so that it reflects post-Covid requirements for flexible delivery and the fostering of innovation.

While New Zealand’s border challenges may currently appear stark, the horticulture industry believes they can be managed in such a way to protect the health of New Zealanders while also ensuring the country can prosper economically, through access to skills and labour that can only be obtained from overseas

Composting mootels can transform dairy, but only if we get things right – Keith Woodford:

Some readers will know that I have been writing about composting mootels for the last three years. I have been suggesting that these mootels can transform New Zealand dairy.   I remain of that perspective, but only if we get things right.

When I first wrote about ‘composting mootels’, I referred to them as ‘composting barns’. Subsequently, I have stepped back from using the term ‘barn’ because it was leading to misunderstandings.   For many folk in the New Zealand dairy industry, the word ‘barn’ is like the mythical red rag to the bull.

Composting mootels are like no other type of barn. They are open structures that focus on cow comfort. Cows love them. They can be a great enhancement to animal welfare.  There is minimal smell – very different to most barns. They can fit seamlessly into New Zealand pastoral systems and in the process solve key environmental problems. . . 

Clydesdales popular centre of attention :

It was horsepower of the old-fashioned variety that proved a drawcard at the Otago Field Days in Palmerston yesterday.

John Booth, from the Dayboo Clydesdale stud in Mid Canterbury, brought Dayboo Annie and Dayboo Sam south, for wagon rides, a children’s tug-of-war today and general admiration – and plenty of pats – from field day visitors.

Mr Booth, who has 17 Clydesdales, enjoyed dealing with the public and both he and the two horses were very patient with the children clamouring for a closer look.

The two-day event, which continues today, moved back to its original site at the Palmerston Showgrounds as it was being planned during Covid-19 Alert Level 2, and allowed for more space than its previous location at the saleyards, chief executive Paul Mutch said. . . 

Rhys Hall announced as 2020 Corteva NZ Young Viticulturist of the Year:

Congratulations to Rhys Hall who became the 2020 Corteva NZ Young Viticulturist of the Year on 8th October. Hall was representing Marlborough and is Assistant Vineyard Manager at Indevin’s Bankhouse.

Congratulations also to Sam Bain from Constellation Brands who came second and George Bunnett from Irrigation Services who came third.

The other contestants were Annabel Angland from Peregrine Wines, Tahryn Mason from Villa Maria and Lacey Agate from Bellbird Spring. . .

Cattle splinter groups urged to ‘get back in the boat’ – Shan Goodwin:

CALLS for unity in advocacy, particularly where grassfed cattle producers are concerned, were made at an industry event, held both live and online, this week.

Hosted by Agforce Queensland, The Business of Beef featured four prominent Queensland producers: David Hill, Bryce Camm, Mark Davie and Russell Lethbridge.

Mr Davie kicked off the talk about the need to have a ‘strong, united, well-funded force’ working on behalf of grassfed producers.

“What I’m talking about is a restructure of CCA (Cattle Council of Australia),” he said. . . 


Rural round-up

07/08/2020

A farmer’s tale: 25 years of highs and lows – Rowena Duncan:

Rowena Duncum gives voice to the high and lows, hard work, love and dedication of all farmers through the story of one farmer, Bruce Eade, as he celebrates 25 years on his farm.

I recently had the honour of being the first guest speaker on new agriculturally focused online platform “Herd it”. After waffling on about my life’s “achievements” (current runner-up, women’s world gumboot throwing, thank-you-very-much!) and my role with The Country, I fielded a question around how farmers can effectively communicate with urban dwellers.

This is something I get asked often, and there’s no one-size-fits-all, but something that always resonates with me is when farmers open up and showcase their lives, their achievements and when things don’t go quite so well. It makes it real. It makes it relatable.

Those in the industry can learn from it, or it could be inspirational for someone interested in agriculture. But most of all, they’re speaking directly to urban New Zealand, with no “media spin” on things. And that’s the best voice there is. . . 

Rug pulled from under trophy hunt operations – Yvonne O’Hara:

Leithen Valley Hunts owner Rachel Stewart has had no clients and no income since New Zealand’s borders were closed.

Her family has had the hunting operation for about 30 years and in a normal year she employs seven staff and provides accommodation for 70 to 100 clients in Wanaka and the Leithen Valley, near Heriot, who come to shoot red and wapiti deer, tahr, chamois and fallow bucks on guided trips.

Clients are mostly American, with some Europeans and a few Australians.

“It was heart-wrenching to let our staff go, as we are a tight team. . . 

Making the most of NZ opportunity – Yvonne O’Hara:

Carol Booth spent an eight-month working holiday on dairy farms in West Otago six years ago.

Two weeks after returning home to Scotland, she knew she wanted to come back.

“I knew then what I wanted to do. There are just so many opportunities here,” Ms Booth said.

About the same time, Matthew Haugh, a dairy farmer near Heriot, offered her a job, so she jumped at the opportunity and moved back to New Zealand permanently.

Five years later, she is in her first year managing the 290ha Cottesbrook Farm for Mr Haugh. . . 

Farmers stocking dams with trout the latest diversification for Buxton Trout & Salmon after coronavirus hits tourism – Marian Macdonald:

First, rising water temperatures cut production in half, now, as the coronavirus slices 80 per cent off his income, land-based farmers are helping to keep a Yarra Valley fish farmer afloat.

Mitch MacRae has had to deal with everything nature can throw at a farmer, and perhaps a little bit more, because his pernickety stock simply die if the water temperature gets above about 24 degrees.

Buxton Trout & Salmon, which lays claim to being Australia’s first commercial trout farm, sits astride the Acheron River near Marysville.

The chilly water fed by Lake Mountain and the Yarra Ranges makes it, the Snowy Mountains and Tasmania, among the few places in Australia that suit rainbow trout year-round. . . 

Technology helps Southland farmer’s replacement heifers hit weight targets :

Investing in weigh scales is helping Southland dairy farmers Julia and Stewart Eden grow bigger heifers which produce more milk.

The couple milk 275 Holstein Friesian cows, which are run as a split-calving herd, at Balfour near Gore.

In 2013, they bought a Te Pari cattle crush fitted with digital scales, enabling them to regularly weigh their replacement heifers.

“Our young stock is weighed and drenched every three weeks from about seven weeks of age,” said Julia. . . 

Congratulations to Lacey Agate from Bellbird Spring:

After a tough day in the vineyards Lacey Agate from Bellbird Spring became the Corteva North Young Viticulturist of the Year 2020 on 31st July following the competition held at Greystone in Waipara.

Congratulations also goes to Will Bowman from Black Estate who was Runner Up.

There were four contestants competing in total, the other two being Brigitte Allan from Pyramid Valley and Lucas Percy from Pegasus Bay, who gave it their all, making it a great competition.

The Young Vits were tested on all aspects of vineyard management, including trellising, pruning, machinery, pests & diseases and budgeting. There was also an interview. Fruitfed Supplies laid on a very welcome BBQ at lunchtime which was then followed by the quiz round and the BioStart Hortisports. . . 


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