Lest we forget

25/04/2019

Lest we forget, we say solemnly.

Lest we forget the sacrifice of those who served in war zones.

Lest we forget that many paid with their lives, many with their health, and that none could return untouched by the horrors they experienced.

My maternal grandfather served with the New Zealand Army in World War I. My mother said he never talked about it and buried his medals in the garden.

My father served with the New Zealand Army’s 20th Battalion. He too didn’t ever say much about his experiences, though did show us the photo of he and the four other men who were the only survivors of the company of 120 after the Battle of Ruweisat Ridge.

When I hear lest we forget I think of that and give thanks I don’t have to live with the memories of what it was like to be there.

No matter what we’ve read, listened to and watched, none of us who have never served in a war zone can understand what it was like.

The Veteran at No Minister, has written a post that reminds us the impact that fighting a war had not just on those who served and not just while they served.

Lest we forget.

 

 


On Anzac Day I remember

25/04/2010

On Anzac Day I remember my grandfather who was one of the men who sailed to Egypt with the New Zealand Army during World War I. There, one of his tasks was caring for the horses.

On Anzac Day I remember my uncle who served in the Royal Navy during World War II.

On Anzac Day I remember my father who served with the NZ Army’s 20th Battalion. He was burned in a tank and survived, was taken prisoner and escaped and was one of only 5 of a company of 120 men who survived the Battle of Ruweisat Ridge.

On Anzac Day I remember my father in law who also served in the 20th Battalion.

On Anzac Day I remember my mother who served as a nurse aid in the New Zealand Army during World War II.

On Anzac Day I remember and I am grateful.


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