Rural round-up

November 9, 2017

Kuriger ‘elated’ with biosecurity and rural communities roles – Christina Perisico:

Barbara Kuriger heads an electorate with no parking meters and one traffic light – but it gives her expertise for her new role in National’s opposition government.

The MP for Taranaki-King Country said she is elated with her new role as biosecurity and rural communities spokesperson.

Her whole electorate is made up of rural communities, she said. . . 

Butter – I can’t believe it’s not . . .cheaper – Joe Bennett:

 Have you seen the price of butter? We live in a land where dairy cows have multiplied like flies in summer, so as compensation for the ruined rivers you’d think we might at least get bargain butter. But no. The price of the stuff has doubled of late. It’s become a luxury.

One has to feel sorry for pensioners. Brought up to see butter as a staple, they can now barely afford it. It seems unfair. And it seems especially unfair when you know why the price has risen. But let’s begin at the beginning.

Butter is simple. At Hassocks County Primary School half a century ago Miss Turner handed out bottles of cream and told us to shake them till our arms ached. When we opened our bottles we found a blob of something pale and yellow. . . 

MPI considering Canterbury rabbit virus application – Alexa Cook:

Canterbury Regional Council has applied for a new strain of rabbit virus to be approved in New Zealand.

Farmers had been expecting the Rabbit Haemorrhagic Virus Disease strain known as K5 to be released earlier this year.

It would mean they would not have to rely on expensive poisons and control measures against rabbit pests.

But in March, Canterbury Regional Council said the introduction would be delayed by a year because it had to do more work to have the virus approved by the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI).

The ministry received the council’s application this week. It is open for consultation until 14 December. . . 

Blessed are the flexible because they shall not be bent out of shape:

Fluctuating milk prices over the past 10 years have led dairy farmers to revise operating structures and consider options outside traditional pathways.

DairyNZ economist Angie Fisher says roles in the dairy sector are more diverse than they once were which is helping farmers adapt to increasing volatility.

“Anecdotal evidence suggests there has been an increase in variations to the standard clauses in sharemilking agreements around the sharing of milk income. This is evidence of the market adapting to milk price volatility,” she says. . . 

Pre-schoolers pitch in for planting project:

Teaching the next generation about their natural environment is a big part of the philosophy of Kids Barn Childcare Centre in the Taranaki town of Hawera.

So when the opportunity to help local farmers, Adam and Josie Werder with a planting project came up the kids and staff at the preschool were delighted.

Kitted out with their gumboots, sunhats and a willingness to get their hands dirty, 25 four-year-olds from Kids Barn visited the farm to learn about, and help with, the planting of native flaxes. . . 

It’s time – new focus on safely managing hazardous substances:

On 1 December the Health and Safety at Work (Hazardous Substances) Regulations 2017 will come into force. The aim is to reduce both the immediate harm to people and longer-term illness caused by hazardous substances in the workplace.

It’s no small matter. A hazardous substance is any product or chemical that has explosive, flammable, oxidising, toxic or corrosive properties – and they’re everywhere. Around one in three New Zealand workplaces use, manufacture, handle or store them. This includes factories, farmers and growers, as well as printers, collision repairers, hairdressers and retailers. They are in commonly used products such as fuels and LPG, solvents, cleaning solutions and agrichemicals. . .

Fonterra continues to build UHT capacity:

Fonterra has today announced it is further expanding its Waitoa UHT site as the Co-operative works to keep ahead of growing demand for its products.

Five years ago the site was an empty paddock, now it produces more than 80,000 cartons of UHT milk and cream every hour for global markets – and it’s about to get even busier.

A new line will be up and running by the end of the year. This is the third new line to be installed in the last 12 months. . . 

 

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Rural round-up

September 28, 2017

Re-elected Taranaki King Country Barbara Kuriger keen to bridge rural urban divide

Re-elected Taranaki King Country MP Barbara Kuriger is to work hard to close the rural urban divide over the next three-year term.

Kuriger retained the safe rural seat for National with a majority of 13,994 with 100 per cent of votes counted, ahead of Labour Party candidate Hilary Humphrey.

Kuriger received 21372 votes to Humphrey’s 7378 votes. . .

Call to destigmatise rural suicide, depression  – Jemma Brakebush:

A farmer who recently lost a family member to suicide is calling for changes to the way mental health is talked about.

Sandra Faulkner farms just out of Gisborne and a member of her extended family took their own life last month.

The family and community were still reeling, and the farming sector needed to change the way it discussed mental health, she said. . .

Methane-chewing bacteria offer good prospects:

Two New Zealand scientists and a Monash, Victoria, biologist have shown that methane-oxidising bacteria (good for tackling greenhouse gas) are more flexible and resilient than previously thought.

Long term this could help the dairy industry in, say, the production of protein feeds. And because it shows the methane-oxidising bacteria working elsewhere, there are implications for cutting greenhouse gas emissions. . .

Farmer confidence in economy slumps – Simon Hartley:

Farmers’ confidence in the year ahead has taken a nosedive with concerns over government policies and volatility in commodity prices.

Given the increased pre-election scrutiny of clean waterways, irrigation issues and intensive farming practices, the rural sector will be holding its breath as coalition talks thrash out policy bottom lines.

In a separate ANZ business outlook survey yesterday, the political uncertainty also sparked caution in September with business confidence falling to a net zero reading, its lowest level in two years, where there were as many pessimists as optimists. . .

NZ structural log prices advance to 23-year high as mills compete with export demand –  Tina Morrison:

(BusinessDesk) – New Zealand structural log prices edged up to the highest level in more than two decades as mills compete with the export market to secure supply for the local construction market.

The price for structural S1 logs lifted to $128 a tonne this month, from $127 a tonne last month, and is sitting 11 percent above last year’s level and 21 percent higher than the five-year average, according to AgriHQ’s monthly survey of exporters, forest owners and saw millers. The S1 structural log price is at its highest level since April 1994. . .


Rural round-up

February 23, 2017

Samuels sets world shearing record

Southland shearer Leon Samuels today set a new world solo eight-hours strongwool ewe-shearing record after a tally of 605 in a woolshed north of Gore.
Shearing at Argyle Station, Waikaia, Samuels was targeting the solo record of 603 set by Te Kuiti shearer Stacey Te Huia in December 2010.

He kept the large crew and growing number of supporters until the dying moments, claiming the record only in the last two minutes of the day which comprised four two-hours runs, the first starting at 7am, and the last ending when sheep number 605 was shut through the porthole just after 5pm. . . 

Fonterra confirms 2016/17 farmgate milk forecast:

Fonterra is required to consider its forecast Farmgate Milk Price every quarter as a condition of the Dairy Industry Restructuring Act. For this purpose, Fonterra Co-operative Group Limited today confirmed the forecast Farmgate Milk Price of $6.00 per kgMS announced in November.

When combined with the forecast earnings per share range for the 2017 financial year of 50 to 60 cents, the total pay-out available to farmers in the current season is forecast to be $6.50 to $6.60 before retentions.

Fonterra Chairman John Wilson says the Co-operative is confident that this forecast is at the right level, following the 75 cent rise in its forecast Farmgate Milk Price in November last year. . .

A semi-retired farmer hits back at Fonterra antis – Barrie Smith:

Over the last few months we have been hearing more from the anti-dairy group from around NZ.

Yes I am a semi-retired dairy farmer, have been involved in Federated Farmers since the age of 23 years, been a councillor on the Stratford County Council and Stratford District Council plus a term on our Regional Council.

It is through this period that one has been involved with research, development and hands-on involvement that makes me very confident our dairying and agriculture in Taranaki and NZ is in good heart.

Because of this, agriculture brings wealth to not only our economy but hundreds of thousands of families as well as feeding over one billion of our 7.4 billion world population. . .

Rotorua dairy farmer Chris Stevens runs three farms – Anne Boswell:

Kaharoa dairy farmer Chris Stevens has some advice for salespeople visiting her farm.

“If they come to the door and ask to speak to my husband, we are unlikely to do business,” she laughs.

Stevens, who grew up on a Gisborne dairy farm, admits she never had a great desire to run her and her husband Chris Haworth’s three dairy farms, but it is a role she has grown to love. . .

Battered Highfield woolshed to be saved – Amanda Bowes:

It may be buckled, bent and shifted off its piles from a ruptured fault running under it, but the historic Highfield woolshed near Waiau will be saved.

The woolshed, which was the first home for the Amuri A&P Association’s shows, was completely shifted off its piles during the November earthquake. . .

Backbench National MP milks cow, drinks milk – Jenna Lynch:

Think shearing a sheep is the ultimate display of being in touch with rural New Zealand?

Think again.

Try milking a cow and drinking the fruits of your labour.

That’s what National MP Barbara Kuriger did over the weekend at the Taranaki Vintage Machinery Club Vintage Hay Days.

Study finds farmers walk faster than any other occupation – Peter McCann:

People from farming backgrounds walk faster than any other occupation group, a study of Irish people aged over 50 years old has found.
The study was conducted by researchers at Trinity College Dublin and surveyed 5,985 from a range of backgrounds to examine relationships between changes in occupation during their lifetimes and physical functionality later in life.

The study, published in the Journals of Gerontology, found that respondents from farming backgrounds walked 0.04m/s faster compared with other occupational groups. . .

 

 


Rural round-up

October 10, 2016

Alliance appoints Stacy to new role :

Alliance Group has appointed Heather Stacy to the newly created role of general manager livestock and shareholder services.

Ms Stacy, who starts work on November 21, has held senior leadership roles,  including as general manager of international farming with Fonterra New Zealand, and  general manager milk supply with Fonterra Australia.

She was previously the executive director of United Dairy Farmers (the dairy sector’s equivalent of Federated Farmers) and has worked in the red meat industry for Meat and Livestock Australia (Australia’s equivalent of Beef and Lamb NZ). . . 

Off to Oz to contest Wayleggo Cup:

Taieri dog trialling enthusiast Graham White, pictured above with his dogs Moss and Ladd, is off to Australia for the annual Transtasman dog trial test.

Mr White, who is president of the New Zealand Sheep Dog Trial Association, is team manager and also the New Zealand judge. . .

Contracting firm changing hands – Sally Rae:

Geoff Scurr and Blair Skevington have a few things in common.

Not only do they live in East Otago, but they showed entrepreneurial streaks from a young age, and shared a passion for the contracting industry.

Mr Scurr was just 16 when he bought his first bulldozer, an International BTD6, for $1800 — a substantial sum for a teenager.

Two years later, he bought a contracting business in Waikouaiti.

Mr Skevington bought the then-closed North Western Hotel in Palmerston when he was 19.

Being underage, he had to find a business partner with a bar manager’s licence to help him reopen it. . . 

Farm systems ‘status quo’ despite forecast milk price:

Dairy farmers Rachel and Kenneth Short say despite a potential increase in forecast milk price, they won’t be making any changes to their farm budget.

The couple are equity partners with Louis and Barbara Kuriger on a 440 cow, 168ha Taranaki farm run under a very simple, low input system which operates year-in, year-out with farm working expenses (FWE) of $1.90-$2.20/kg MS. Production for 2016/17 is expected to be 140,000kg MS.

“We’ve run the same financial budget since 2010. We never make changes to the budget – even at a high payout, our farm working expenses are identical to what they are this year,” says Rachel. . . 

While most African farms are organic @OxfamNZ @GreenpeaceNZ @SteffanBrowning – Utopia:

Image may contain: text and food

Africa’s urgent need for agricultural modernization is being rudely ignored. When elite urbanites in rich countries began turning away from science-based farming in the 1980s, external assistance for agriculture in poor countries was cut sharply. As late as 1980 the U.S. Agency for International Development was still devoting 25 percent of its official development assistance to the modernization of farming, but today it is just 1 percent. . . 

Farmers warned not to plant left-over contaminated fodder beet seed:

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) is cautioning farmers not to plant left-over seed from any of the six lines of fodder beet seed imported last year and known to be contaminated with velvetleaf.

MPI is working with industry players and regional councils to manage the incursion of the pest weed resulting from the importation of the contaminated seed.

Response Incident Controller David Yard says there are hundreds of properties around New Zealand that have velvetleaf on them and we don’t want any more. . . 

Forest Enterprises now licensed:

One of New Zealand’s leading forest investment and management companies has been licensed.

On 3 October, Forest Enterprises Limited was licensed under the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 to manage Managed Investment Schemes (excluding managed funds) which are primarily invested in forestry assets.

Managing Director Steve Wilton describes the licence as a “milestone” for the company.

He says Forest Enterprises was, on 5 October, one of just two forestry investment specialists that had been licensed out of a total of 51 licensed MIS managers. Most of the others are managers of managed funds. . . 

#GMO the most regulated & tested product in agricultural history:

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(Click the link on the headline above for more)


Rural round-up

March 17, 2016

It’s cyclic – ‘We will survive’  – Dirk Sieling:

Dairy economist Peter Fraser cannot go unchallenged. The anti-Fonterra and dairying bias he showed during his time at the Ministry for Primary Industries continues unabated.

His simple tactic of building a case on an unsubstantiated or false premise is typical of the misguided notions that often end up in the public domain.

In his March 7 article, he quotes data from the Reserve Bank showing that dairy farmers are borrowing about $3.5 billion per year “just to stay afloat”. This is just a nonsense.

Dairy farmers may well be borrowing that amount on average over time, but it is more often than not to buy another farm, build a new cowshed or convert drystock land to dairying.

But on the premise that it is “just to stay afloat”, he builds a scenario of lots of farmers going broke and collapsing land prices, all in a downward spiral. . . 

From a farming MP to her province – Barbara Kuriger:

The dairy industry is once again headlining news this week. I acknowledge this is a tough time for farmers. You and I as farmers know that the dairy pay-out is volatile; it rises and it dips and as a result of this, it has evolved as one of the most financially enduring industries in the agricultural sector. Falling dairy prices means it may be a tight year for many, and budgets are being adapted to counter this.

There has been much emotive talk by opposition about how our Government is ‘failing the dairy industry’, because they can’t actively step into this situation and raise the dairy pay out back to $8 kilogram MS. But the Government does have in progress three incredibly gutsy pieces of legislation that will assist the dairy industry, for which the benefits to dairy are widely unreported.  . . 

Dairy farmers forget past lessons – Mark Lister:

Milk is a cyclical commodity, and prices have been low before.

he long-term outlook for the dairy sector is strong, but the immediate future is highly concerning. Global prices are down 12 per cent this year and about a third lower than a year ago.

Against that backdrop, it was unsurprising to see Fonterra reduce its milk payout forecast to $3.90 per kg of milksolids this week. Adding in the dividend from Fonterra, the total payout will be about $4.25.

This is the lowest payout since 2006/07, and with a break-even price of about $5.30, the majority of farmers will suffer a second year of operating losses. . . 

Controlling dairy farm cost of production – Keith Woodford:

The key dairy priority at the moment, which stands above all else, is to minimise the number of New Zealand dairy farmers who will succumb to the current downturn. In particular, we all need to try and limit the damage to the latest generation of younger farmers who are often the most indebted.

It is all about getting the cost of production under control.

I have previously written about survival strategies and the need for each farm and farmer to chart his or her own path. I have also tried to caution against panicking and making big system changes when in a crisis. More particularly, I have tried to emphasise that hungry cows always kick their owners in the back pocket. Also, I regularly try and remind people that cost of production has both a numerator (which is cost) and a denominator (which is production). . . 

Irrigation funding boost for Wairarapa, Hawke’s Bay and Gisborne:

Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy has welcomed three new investments totalling $1.6 million into irrigation projects coming from the Ministry for Primary Industries’ Irrigation Acceleration Fund (IAF).

The three irrigation projects receiving funding are in the Wairarapa ($804,000), Hawke’s Bay ($575,000), and Gisborne ($250,000).

“This funding helps support the development of irrigation proposals to the stage where they are investment ready,” says Mr Guy.  . . 

Funding for irrigation unlocks potential:

Irrigation New Zealand applauds the latest announcement by Government sighting three more grants by the Irrigation Acceleration Fund – $804,000 for the Wairarapa Water Use Project, $575,000 for Ruataniwha (Hawke’s Bay) and $250,000 for Gisborne’s Managed Aquifer Recharge Trial.

“It’s great to see the Irrigation Acceleration Fund delivering on what it was set up to do – supporting the potential for irrigated agriculture to contribute to New Zealand’s sustainable economic growth,” says Irrigation New Zealand chairwoman Nicky Hyslop. . . .

Research to set NZ sheep milk apart:

New Zealand’s sheep milk industry is set to benefit from ground-breaking research by AgResearch.

Two hundred people are attending the second Sheep Milk NZ industry conference, being held in Palmerston North this week (14th-15th March). The first conference last year attracted 160 people, with the rise reflecting the increased interest in the industry.

AgResearch scientists presented the initial results from two years of research from the $6 million MBIE-funded programme “Boosting exports of the emerging dairy sheep industry”, ranging from composition of New Zealand sheep milk through to best practice effluent management. . . 

Industry looks beyond radiata:

Future generations of New Zealanders may live in a patchwork landscape where several different forest species compete on the hills for growing space with the familiar Pinus radiata.

“Radiata is a great multi-purpose tree that grows well in many places. But it is not perfect for all growing situations or market needs. And there are obvious risks in having all our eggs in one species basket,” says Forest Owners Association research and development manager Russell Dale.

“We are therefore thrilled as an industry that the government is joining us in the Specialty Woods Products Research Partnership. This is a major programme that will investigate new products and markets for alternative species and build the confidence of forest growers in planting those species that show promise.” . . 

Fonterra’s Anmum Formula Hits Nz Shelves:

Fonterra’s internationally established infant nutrition brand Anmum is now available to New Zealand families.

Fonterra Brands New Zealand Managing Director Leon Clement says Anmum is a $200 million brand in Fonterra’s Asian markets with an established track record of quality and trust with parents.

“Anmum draws on Fonterra and its legacy companies’ 50 plus years of experience in dairy research and in producing paediatric formulas for third parties. Bringing Anmum to New Zealand families means we are now providing nutrition for key life stages,” he says. . . 

Growth Attracts 28 New Canterbury Milk Suppliers:

Synlait now has 201 milk suppliers for 2016 / 2017 to meet forecast growth in their value-added nutritional product business.

John Penno, Managing Director and CEO, said a combination of increased customer demand for nutritional products – such as a2 Platimum® Infant Formula – and increased production capacity with a new large scale spray dryer has created an opportunity for Canterbury dairy farmers to supply Synlait.

“We’ve had a very positive response to this opportunity, to the extent we have not been able to accept supply from everyone interested and we now have a waiting list,” said Mr Penno. . . 


Barbara Kuriger’s maiden speech

October 28, 2014

National’s Taranaki-King Country MP Barbara Kuriger delivered her maiden speech last week:

Tena tatou katoa, te paremata hou
te kaikorero tena koe
te pirimia tena koe
Ko nga mea nui, nga wai, te whenua me nga tangata katoa o aotearoa
Na reira, tena koutou, tena koutou, tena tatou katoa

Mr Speaker, Prime Minister, Ministers, Members of Parliament, Party President, Mr Peter Goodfellow.

And welcome to my guests in the Gallery.

My husband Louis, you’ve been a fantastic support and friend to me. We will be celebrating our 35th wedding anniversary 12 days from now at an electorate event in Otorohanga, which in itself indicates the level of support you have given me during the campaign.

Craig, Rachel and Tony, dad and I are very proud of you all, and I appreciate that you have all made it here for  this special occasion.  Tony, I know you are watching.  I want to mention your partners Kenneth and Zoe at home, and our four special grandchildren Zak, Max, Aislinn, and Theo.

Mum and dad, Leo and Leonie, thank you for coming.  I would also like to acknowledge my grandmother Joan Jeffries in Opunake, who recently turned 98.

Peter Goodfellow, Peter Osborne, Leveson Gower, and National HQ staffers, Young Nats, and party members; from selection to election you have all welcomed me and supported me in my quest to become a Member of Parliament. Together we asked lots of questions and took good advice, and here we are. Thank you.

I was brought up on a Taranaki Dairy Farm and I had one goal – never to marry a Dairy Farmer.  Louis, I’m very pleased I did because I learned the ropes, developed a passion and enjoyed my time on the farm, raising our family and developing an award-winning business which continues today.

This led to many of my industry roles, the longest of which I completed last week at DairyNZ.  I would like to especially acknowledge DairyNZ Chair, friend, and colleague – John Luxton, who is in the House.  John, you and I were elected to the Board on the same day in 2003. Over the past 11 years I have learned a lot from you, and respect the wisdom and knowledge you impart.

I’ve served on a range of boards over the past few years.  Primary Industry Training Organisation, Taratahi, and Dairy Training have provided me with the skills needed for the training industry. I was a NZ Young Farmers’ Board Member, where I suspect I own the honour of being the only grannie to have been a board member. As an Industry Partner to this group I was able to enjoy working with young people having their first board experience, who I know will feature in many areas of leadership in New Zealand over the next 30 years.

In 2006, I was fortunate to travel as an Agricultural and Marketing Research and Development Trust Scholar on a food and agribusiness market experience to China, Japan, US, and Europe looking at supply chains and customers. This experience really highlighted the fact that New Zealand is favoured for its exports, indicating New Zealand’s standout place in the international trading arena.

In 2012, the Dairy Women’s Network awarded me the Inaugural Dairy Woman of the Year, which was one of my proudest moments to date.  It was not a one person accolade, as it was a result of all the experiences I have had to this point in my life, and of all the people who I have met. The information learned on this course and friendships formed emphasises the rural and regional woman that I am, always looking to the future for ways the primary industry sector can grow. I was also a board member of the Venture Taranaki Trust. In recognition of my governance roles, I was recently awarded a Fellowship of the Institute of Directors.

Taranaki-King Country is a large electorate, which extends from Waingaro right down to Toko on the border of Stratford, thus including Waipa and parts of Waikato.  Upon selection, one of my new constituents offered to buy this Naki girl a Waikato Rugby jersey.  I told him I would wear it with pride.  The respective mascots for the local teams, Mooloo the cow and Ferdinand the bull, always manage to create a great herd. And best of all, when Taranaki play Waikato, I can only win as the Taranaki-King Country MP.  Minister Smith, we are looking forward to the Taranaki versus Tasman final this weekend.

While I have an interest in rugby, it is not necessarily my favourite sport.  The excitement of V8 Supercar racing is another passion that I have to thank Louis for sharing with me.  I have been a passenger at 260 km per hour on a racetrack with a professional driver, and I can categorically say that my own driving skills are not quite up to that standard. I’ll be honest and say that I’m happy to be a spectator; supporting Louis as he drives his Star Car, much like he supports me in my campaigning.

In the large electorate that is Taranaki-King Country, we have eight district councils, about 17 towns, and many little villages. Our largest town is Te Awamutu.  Whangamomona is one of the smallest.  I am the MP who will not forget about the Forgotten World Highway.  I encourage you all to take the tour, an excellent tourism business set up on the old railway. I am the MP who will not forget the natural beauty of our electorate, which can be seen in the Waitomo Caves and the huge number of visitors that visit annually to experience the beauty of the glow worms and the history hidden in these caves. I am the MP who probably doesn’t have the willpower to drive past our famous whitebait fritters in our towns, including Mokau and Raglan, without stopping for that quintessential Kiwi lunch. Ultimately, I am the MP that is here to serve every one of our towns to ensure the future of Taranaki-King Country is bright.

Economic development in the regions is a key interest of mine.  Getting the right incentives in place for businesses to thrive in rural locations is a must.  Housing is not expensive, and the community is atmosphere supportive and embracing.  The call for more skilled young people is coming from every community.

Coming from Taranaki I have been witness to the growth that comes from a region that has worked together over many years to create a vibrant region, that comes from having an open mind, a willingness to trust new ideas, and a will to work together. From this we can see that when communities actively work together, success can be achieved.

Trade and exports lead our region’s income. The dairy and beef and lamb industries are predominant throughout our electorate.  Energy in itself is one of the integral parts of the Taranaki export economy. In Taranaki-King Country we also have dairy goats, Manuka honey, and a popcorn factory – something for everyone. But the young are not forgotten either, with the long established Fun Ho toy factory in Inglewood. Each of my grandchildren, the boys and the girl, all received a Fun Ho tractor and trailer for their 1st birthday, continuing the tradition of their parents receiving a similar tractor set for their 1st birthday.

Ultrafast broadband will provide a huge boost to our region.  The productivity that comes with connectivity will help us attract people who want the benefits of working regionally. I look forward to working with Minister Amy Adams to ensure this rolls out across Taranaki-King Country.

Roading and infrastructure will continue to be a focus in Taranaki-King Country.  I particularly look forward to the new roundabout at the intersection of State Highway 3 and State Highway 37 and the business case for the Mt Messenger/Awakino corridor. I also look forward to the development of various bridges across the electorate, which will further strengthen relationships between communities with improved accessibility and safety.

Mr Speaker, you recently came to visit Waitomo and Piopio.  Louis in particular was extremely honoured by your visit, namely because it was his birthday. That day we saw some great examples of fledgling regional businesses.  The new King Country Brewery and a small business in Piopio fitting out dinghies are indicative of the success that ensues when our regions work together, we thrive. We must make sure that red tape doesn’t get in the way of new and emerging businesses that will provide employment for our people. I’ve already seen some exciting technology businesses in Raglan and encouragement of more will be welcome.

Access to health, education, and community services are vitally important to rural and remote areas of regional New Zealand.  Under a National-led Government over 17,000 more elective surgeries have been administered across our electorate’s two district health boards. This shows those in somewhat remote areas of New Zealand are still gaining access to those vital services and that location is not a barrier. Across our region, more children are attending ECE before starting primary school, which is impressive for rural communities considering the distance that’s often regarded as a barrier. In time we hope to improve these ECE rates even more, with a target of 98 per cent by 2016.

Volunteers connect our communities.  From the Fire Service and Coast Guard, to those working in the prevention of family violence, I would like to thank all volunteers who do a wonderful job. Those who give up their time to take a neighbour to a doctor’s appointment, or those busy mums and dads who arrange play dates for the entire street; your support and continual commitment to the groups and individuals in our region is to be commended. These actions take away the vulnerability of people, knowing there is a volunteer support base to care for them.

Water will be a prominent topic, not just through the time that I spend in Parliament, but for years into the future. This is reflective of the fact we have an abundance of water in our beautiful country, and it is amongst my aspirations to ensure that we utilise our water wisely for our people, for our tourism, and for our industries. As a dairy industry leader, I appreciate how much work has been done in fencing, nutrient budgeting, and finding ways to improve water quality.

It will be a pleasure to join my first BlueGreens Caucus meeting.  National’s Bluegreen’s approach has shown that successful economic and environmental policy can, and must, go hand in hand. The abundant forests, rivers, and marine reserves are of real value and importance to the National Government, who are committed to long term sustainability of these areas that New Zealanders hold dear.

On the completion of my time as Dairy Women of the Year, I set myself a target that by the year 2020, in New Zealand we will no longer be talking about the disconnect between the rural and urban.  We have the collective knowledge, talent, and ability to work together to find answers.  It is a big call, but one that I’m up for.  I ask each and every one of you to join me in this project.  We only have four and a half million people – we have to work collaboratively to take on the world.

Thank you to my colleagues for the support that you have shown over the past few months and particularly over the past four weeks.   Maureen Pugh, the Class of 2014 enjoyed the two weeks we spent with you, we were sorry to see you go.

Samantha, Claire, Sharon, and Tracey welcome to my team.  With your help, I know Taranaki-King Country will be well served. Penn and Doug, thanks for your help and preparation.

I am excited about joining the Primary Production and Health Committees where I can bring some of my existing knowledge with me, and embark on a new learning curve where new knowledge is required.

I commit to be a hard-working and loyal Member of Parliament.

Tena tatou katoa.


Class of 2014

September 23, 2014

Prime Minister-elect John Key, his deputy Bill English and the new national MPs:

Bill English and I were proud to welcome National’s 15 new MPs to Parliament this morning.

 


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