D for democracy

10/12/2010

Part of the blame for the poor showing by Kris Faafoi in the Mana by-election can be laid on Labour’s poor selection processes. The union and head office candidate selected wasn’t the one preferred by most members in the electorate.

The party is now facing selection problems in Manuwera:

A by-election in the Labour held Manurewa seat is looking increasingly likely as Labour’s ruling council calls the bluff of sitting MP George Hawkins.

Hawkins has been threatening to resign from Parliament for months unless his preferred candidate, Ian Dunwoodie, is chosen. . .

The seven nominees for Manurewa are list MP Ashraf Choudhary, Dunwoodie, union organiser Jerome Mika, lawyer Amelia Schaaf, human resources manager Shane Te Pou, company director Raj Thandi and former MP Louisa Wall.

Mika has the backing of Labour’s most powerful union affiliate the EPMU.

No sitting MP, or any other individual, should be able to dictate who is selected as a candidate, but allowing head office and unions to have more say than individual members is just as undemocratic.

Labour gets a D for democracy which raises a question: how can a party run a democratic government when it can’t even run a democratic selection?


Key tops Trans Tasman’s political roll call

07/12/2008

Trans Tasman’s political roll call will be available to subscribers tomorrow but the print edition of the Sunday Star Times gives an edited version which puts John Key in the top spot with a score of 9/10.

Bill English follows on 8.5, Judith Collins, Tim Groser, Anne Tolley and Tariana Turia are third equal with 7.5.

Helen Clark, Pita Sharples, Murray McCully, Chris Finlayson, Paula Bennett and Phil Goff all score 7/10.

The SST reports that the lowest scoring National MP is Colin King on 2.

King, a former farmer and three times Golden Shears camp, took his roasting in good part, saying he “wouldn’t be a bit surprised” about the ranking. But he said while he might be invisable to some Wellington analysts, he’d doubled his election majority in Kaikoura and in his first term had followed the good advice of keeping his mouth shut and breathing through his nose. A log of his work had been “back room” and he was part of a “champion team”.

Trans Tasman’s rankings are determined by six parliamentary insiders. They are based on MPs’ performances in Wellington and doesn’t take into account the work they do in their electorates so King’s response is fair.

He was part of 2005’s large intake of new National MPs, not all of whom can be stars in the house. His electorate majority of 11,077 which was 57.8% of the vote, shows he’s won the support of people of Kaikoura which at 23,706 square kilometres is the fourth biggest general electorate in the country.

He was also 1.5 above the lowest MP in Trans Tasman’s rankings – Labour’s Ashraf Choudhary who dropped from 1 last year  to just .5/10 and he’s a list MP so can’t use the excuse of having an electorate to serve for his non-performance in parliament.


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