Rural round-up

January 12, 2020

Dairy farm sales dry up as tighter bank lending, foreign investment take hold – Catherine Harris:

Commentators say dairy farm values are falling, as bank lending tightens and foreign investment becomes harder to get.

According to the Real Estate Institute (REINZ), sales of dairy farms nationally tumbled 55 per cent in the three months to November on the same period in 2018, and 83 per cent on 2017.

Dairy farm prices slid 22 per cent, from $50,964 per hectare to $39,678 per hectare.

Lincoln University farm management professor and commentator Keith Woodford told RNZ that while other types of farms such as grazing or horticulture were holding their own, dairying had suffered, despite improving milk prices. . . 

Border collie saves flock of sheep from wall of fire in Australia: –  Joe Roberts:

A hero border collie has saved a flock of sheep as a wall of fire destroyed farmland in Australia.

Patsy the six-year-old working dog rounded the sheep up with a farmer as the flames bore down on them in the rural town of Corryong in Victoria.

She brought them to the safest paddock on the farm as her owner fought the fire in a tractor with a tank of water.

Thanks to Patsy and her owner, almost all of the sheep were saved, along with the hay bales, silage, shearing shed, and farm houses. . .

‘Mycoplasma bovis’ challenges faced – Laura Smith:

‘‘One of the greatest biosecurity challenges we’ve ever faced’’ — Mycoplasma bovis continues to affect farmers but the Ministry for Primary Industries is confident eradication of the disease can be achieved.

Southland farm owners Ben Walling and Sarah Flintoft had 1700 cattle culled in 2018 after Mycoplasma bovis was discovered on their farm.

Since then they were declared disease-free, but are now awaiting results after tests on cows at one of their three cattle farms.

The bovine disease Mycoplasma bovis can cause mastitis, pneumonia, arthritis and late-term abortions. More than 130,700 cattle have been culled nationwide because of it. . . 

Fonterra rationalises in Chile – Hugh Stringleman:

Fonterra is buying the minority interests in its Chilean processing partner, Prolesur, to streamline its businesses and give it more options for the future.

Among the options could be an exit from the dairy industry in Chile after several decades of New Zealand involvement, firstly by the Dairy Board in 1986.

Fonterra has agreed to buy 13.6% of Prolesur for NZ$29.3 million from Fundacion Isabel Aninat, a church-owned charity. . . 

Remote island farm on market – Richard Rennie:

A long-held family property on Great Barrier Island offers the chance to own the last piece of land before Chile.

It includes private beaches and an historic grave site for shipwreck victims.

The Mabey family has farmed the 195ha property at the island’s northern end for almost a century and has decided to put the farm on the market as a bare block. 

The land is farmed by Scott Mabey who said he anticipates a buyer will be most interested in building a dream home on one of the farm’s many elevated positions. . . 

The beef farmer eats a plant patty – Uptown Farms:

Well… we did it. We were in a hip little craft beer joint in Nashville, saw the Impossible burger on the menu, and ordered one.

Of course they wanted to send it out with a fresh baked bun, cheese and all the sauces.

But we passed on all of that so we could really get an idea what all the fuss was about. Here’s what we decided:

🌱 It is better with ranch. Matt jokes, “What vegetable isn’t?” (His jokes are getting worse the older he gets.) . . 


Rural round-up

July 20, 2018

Red Meat group shares knowledge – Sally Rae:

With a relatively new farming business, Dunback couple Scott and Nadine Tomlinson were keen to surround themselves with some key people.

So they joined an Otago-based Red Meat Profit Partnership Action Network group made up of nine farming couples.

Last week, the group held its second meeting at Barewood Station, a Lone Star Farms-owned property between Outram and Middlemarch. The focus was on body condition scoring and parasite management.

The RMPP Action Network aimed to help farmers put their ideas into action on-farm. Essentially, a group of farmers identified a problem and, with the help of experts, worked together to come up with a solution . .

Wairoa set to tap into  ‘hops hemp horticulture’ production – John Boynton:

Could Wairoa become the next foodbowl of New Zealand?

The Poutama Trust, a Māori business development service, is working with a Māori land trust in Wairoa to untap the potential for food production.

Paroa Trust chairman Luis McDonnell said the organisation was working toward a hops trial. . .

Young Farmer involvement ultimate win-win – Sally Rae:

Emma Sutherland has given a lot to Young Farmers and it has given her a lot back – including a husband.

Mrs Sutherland (31), a member of the Clinton club, was recognised for her service at the organisation’s recent national awards evening in Invercargill.

It was a stellar week for the Otago-Southland region; as well as Mrs Sutherland’s success, Brooke Flett won the stock judging and Otago-Southland won best region in New Zealand. . .

LIC’s FY net profit tumbles on one-offs but revenue reaches record -Rebecca Howard:

(BusinessDesk) – Livestock Improvement Corp, the dairy herd genetics cooperative, reported a 55 percent drop in full-year net profit on higher restructuring costs but was upbeat about the current year as those costs will no longer be incurred.

Net profit for the year to May 31 was $9.3 million versus $20.8 million, the Hamilton-based company said in a statement. Reported earnings before interest and taxation were $14.9 million, also down 54 percent. In both cases, the result was weighed by one-off transformation costs and the annual revaluation of the biological bull team. However, stripping out those costs ebit was $27 million versus $20.7 million in the same period a year earlier, it said. . .

Pāmu updates full year EBITDAR forecast:

Landcorp Faming Limited (Pāmu) has released an updated EBITDAR (Earnings before Interest, Taxes, Depreciation, Amortization and Revaluations) forecast for the 2017/18 financial year.

Previous advice from Pāmu at the time it released its half-year result was an estimated EBITDAR of between $33 and $38 million for the full year. This has now been revised up to an estimated EBITDAR of between $47 – $52 million. . .

Woodville farmer first woman elected head of Young Farmer competition  –  Paul Mitchell:

A Woodville farmer is proud to be the new head organiser of one of New Zealand’s most prestigious farming competitions, and part of the new wave of women joining the New Zealand Young Farmers’ Board.

Rebecca Brown was elected chairwoman of the FMG Young Farmer of the Year committee last week. She is the first woman to hold the role in the contest’s 50-year history.

“I’m really honoured. It’s a cool feeling and shows that women can do anything” . .

Two new feed ingredient peas:

Plant Research (NZ) Ltd, a privately-owned plant breeding and research company based in Christchurch New Zealand, has released two new field pea varieties designed for the emerging pea ingredients market.

The use of field peas for producing a wide range of new foods is increasing rapidly globally. Plant Research (NZ) Ltd together with it’s USA based breeding partner have been working for 10 years to develop the two new varieties. Both companies have linkages with major feed ingredient companies who are helping to understand key traits that are important for fractionation and ingredients for different products. . . 

Farmed insects could provide feed for livestock – Paula Park:

Common house flies (Musca domestica) may be a cheap and sustainable source of feed for farm animals, according to a scientist and an entrepreneur.

The flies, whose larvae can be bred, nurtured and ground into granules, provide roughly the same amount of edible protein as fish meal and other widely used protein sources, said entrepreneur Jason Drew.  

Drew’s book, The Story of the Fly and How it Could Save the World, launched in London, United Kingdom, last week, argues that the insect’s larvae should be farmed commercially to provide protein for farmed fish and animals to feed the world’s growing population.   . .

 

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