Nature always has last word

August 17, 2011

Around the World, the blog of an Australian family on a one year round the world tour is a must read for anyone keen on vicarious travel.

They’ve reached Iceland and I was amused to read  about their walk through geothermal springs in a town centre:

 The town’s greenhouses, heating, three swimming pools and much more are heated by the springs. Walking about through clouds of sulphurous steam and seeing some amazing growths in the streams was great. We were heartily amused to read of one of the holes we saw having been used as a dump. Then an earthquake caused a massive geyser-like eruption which deposited the rubbish over the entire town. There was a nostalgic display of broken pottery and toy parts collected from the distributed refuse.

Yet another reminder that we shouldn’t mess with nature – she always has the last word.


Did you see the one about . . .

March 27, 2011

All Blacks in space – Eric Roy has a photo to prove it.

Go for the best deal regardless and “local” will really look after itself – Eye to the Long Run on why buying local isn’t necessarily better.

Earthquake photos – Offsetting Behaviour on Goggle Maps with lots of links.

Parlez vous Francais? – Penguinunearthed at Around the World on immersion language lessons.

Latest! Adolf Hitler predicts rain in Hokitika – Brian Edwards has the video.


Did you see the one about . . .

January 30, 2011

My cricket World Cup squad – Imperator Fish mixes politics and sport.

Just one day – Liberty Scott reminds us what we must remember on Holocaust Memorial Day.

Macdoctor compares state of the nation addresses  –  and shows a picture really is worth 1,000 words. He also does the numbers on asset sales in Sell Down.

Crime scene cooking and bags of milk – Around the World on cultural differences of the culinary kind.

Don’t believe the lies – Kiwiblog figures what’s wrong with what Labour’s saying. He also gives a plug for WordCamp NZ.

Let us not march – Dim Post has word clouds from this week’s state of the nation speeches.

Two year Review – Pablo at Kiwipolitico looks back on two years of blogging.

Phil Goff – the beehive – Whaleoil shows how one silly idea could lead to another.


Did you see the one about

January 24, 2011

Coalition of losers – Graeme Edgler the Legal Beagle at Public Address on the second place getter leading a government. Chris Trotter responds to this post with Dangerous Falsehoods  at Bowalley Road.

Changing or not – Progressive Turmoil on why procrastination isn’t always wrong.

Baby boomers lift share of job market: David Chaston at Interest.co.nz with stats and graphs on employment and population trends.

Book Aid International – A Cat of Impossible Colour reminds me not to take access to books for granted.



I’ve a feeling we’re not in Kansas anymore Quote Unquote maps the USA states’ economic status.

Here they come again Morry Myna’s cartoon on the coming year.

Bedouin bush mechanics – Around the World’s desert adventures.


Did you see the one about . . .

January 18, 2011

Eat up those carrots – Michael Edwards at Molecular Matters (via Sci Blogs) – on the beauty benefits of caretenoids.

Wednesday whimsy Larvatus Prodeo has found the Cake Wreck Blog.

Judges rule on on landmark case of Sod’s Law vs Parkinson’s Law – News Biscuit reports from the court.

Politics is a poor process for resolving issues – Eye to the Long Run show how the market can be bettter than politics.

The crash from an Austrian perspective – Anti Dismal has six good points.

Tall toilet tales – Around the World  across the spectrum from low hygiene loos to high tech ones.


Do you roll or fold?

November 30, 2010

That potentially personal question came up in today’s discussion about on-line matters with Jim Mora on Critical Mass.

The rolling and folding question was brought up by Aptenodyte on Around the World – the record of an Australian family of four’s year of travel. 

Posts so far have been on preparation and the rolling or folding applies to how you pack your clothes.

The travelling starts on Saturday.

We also discussed Simon Heffer’s style notes.

As one afflicted with wobbly spelling and a propensity for typos I found myself admiring his erudition and being relieved I wasn’t one of the writers who provide the many examples of what not to do.

Heffer is an editor and style guru at the Daily Telegraph and has written Strictly English about which you can read on Beattie’s Book Blog.


%d bloggers like this: