Rural round-up

April 19, 2014

Dairy NZ says won’t be water ‘whipping boy’ any more –   Lynn Grieveson:

Dairy NZ says the dairy industry is no longer willing to be the “whipping boy” for any decreasing water quality of New Zealand’s streams and rivers, while Fish and Game has called for a public inquiry into the water quality issue.

Both groups appeared before Parliament’s Local Government and Environment Select Committee on Thursday to discuss the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment’s report on water quality, which described the problem of nitrogen leaching into waterways.

Chairman of DairyNZ John Luxton, standing in for Rick Pridmore, Dairy NZ’s Strategy and Investment Leader for Sustainability, said some of our most polluted streams and rivers were in urban areas. . . .

 

China, food and NZInc – Ketih Woodford:

The latest statistics show that New Zealand exports to China continue to surge. In the 12 months to February 2014, milk powder and beef exports each more than doubled, sheep meat sales increased by 80%, and log sales increased by 65%. Overall, exports to China increased from $7.1 billion to 10.9 billion, comprising 22% of total exports.

This overall percentage figure is not in itself a record. Both before and during the 1960s we were much more dependent than this on Britain, and in 1989 our exports to Japan reached 18% of total exports, before declining to the current figure of less than 6%. Nevertheless, the sheer speed of the increase in exports to China is causing concern both to commentators and the industries themselves.

I see no point in worrying about increasing reliance on China as a market destination. It is a simple reality that trade with China is going to increase a lot further yet. As long as the Chinese continue to pay more than other markets, then that is where the products will go. . .

 Good turn-out of forestry conference – Joanna Grigg:

Gray skies did not dampen the enthusiasm of 280 foresters and tree enthusiasts at the recent New Zealand Farm Forestry Association conference in Marlborough.

Field trips were a big part of the four-day programme, organised by the Marlborough Tree Growers Association.

An eclectic group of farmers, corporate foresters, scientists, and plant people had the chance to see radiata pine forests in the Marlborough Sounds, eucalyptus for durable post-production, amenity plantings for farms, and machinery to harvest trees safely on steep land. . .

Lorneville rendering plant commissioned:

LEADING MEAT processor and exporter Alliance Group has completed commissioning the second stage of its $25 million new rendering plant at Lorneville near Invercargill.

The plant produces high quality meat meal sought by pet food manufacturers and for animal feeds, as well as tallow for use in a range of applications from cosmetics to biofuels. The products are exported to international markets such as China, North America, Europe and Asia.

It incorporates the latest technology including a Press Dewatering System, which uses less energy and produces high quality products. The process, is virtually “zero waste”, resulting in high product yields and low wastewater output. . .

Food safety professional development:

AN INCREASINGLY sophisticated food industry stemming from the globalised nature of food production also means more complex issues around food safety and security.

With New Zealand’s heavy reliance on exporting primary produce, this demands robust knowledge and constant up-skilling in the processes and requirements of food safety and security by industry professionals.

Lincoln University, through its Centre for Food Research and Innovation, is now running a series of ongoing professional development courses for those in the food industry. . .

New DairyNZ director appointed:

A new independent director has been appointed to the board of dairy farming industry body, DairyNZ.

DairyNZ board chairman John Luxton says Peter Schuyt has been appointed to replace independent director John Spencer who has stepped down after his term on the board. “I thank John for his excellent contribution to both DairyNZ and to the New Zealand dairy industry over many years.”

John says Peter will be a valuable addition to the board.

“We have three independent directors as well as five farmer-elected members. Peter will bring some broad experience to the table as he is an independent director for a broad range of New Zealand businesses,” he says. . .

Aquaculture New Zealand welcomes Supreme Court decision:

Aquaculture New Zealand has welcomed the long awaited Supreme Court decision clearing the way for three new salmon farms in the Marlborough Sounds.

“It has been a long, expensive and uncertain process to get to this point,” said Aquaculture New Zealand Chairman Bruce Hearn.

“Hopefully we are now at a point where New Zealand King Salmon can proceed with their growth plans and get on with what they do best – sustainably producing the world’s best salmon. . .


Rural round-up

March 4, 2013

Commission updates Primary Production select committee on interest rate swaps investigation:

Commerce Commission Chairman Dr Mark Berry has today provided an update to the Primary Production select committee on the Commission’s progress in its interest rate swaps investigation.

In August 2012 the Commission began enquiring into whether interest rate swaps, a financial derivative product, were misleadingly marketed from 2005 onwards. The Commission has received 42 complaints since concerns were raised in the media.

“The investigation is at an early stage, but we are giving the issues full consideration. To date we have spent more than 1,000 staff hours on the investigation,” Dr Berry said.

The Commission is primarily considering whether the swaps were marketed in ways that may have misled customers as to their true risk, nature and suitability. . .

Minister welcomes King Salmon report:

The final report of the Board of Inquiry on New Zealand King Salmon’s application to develop new marine farms in the Marlborough Sounds was welcomed today by Minister of Conservation Dr Nick Smith.

“The Board has undertaken a thorough process being mindful of the need for New Zealand to conserve its natural resources with the need to grow exports, jobs and wealth,” Dr Smith says.

“The substantive decisions in the final report are consistent with the draft released last year, with the Board approving four new farms. These farms will occupy an area of just six hectares of surface water space out of a total of about 100,000 hectares in the Marlborough Sounds. They will enable King Salmon to grow its production from 7,500 to 15,000 tonnes per year, employ another 170 people and boost its annual export earnings by an extra $60m. . .

Good For Marlborough, Good For New Zealand:

The EPA Board of Inquiry’s (BOI) final determination will enable New Zealand King Salmon to deliver long-term benefits to the region, the community and the national economy.

Aquaculture New Zealand Chairman Peter Vitasovich said the four new salmon farms approved in the decision would create permanent full-time jobs and provide significant downstream benefits for associated industries while generating export earnings through the sustainable production of premium seafood.

“Four new working salmon farms in the Marlborough Sounds will provide valuable employment opportunities within the community, while also attracting skilled labour to the region, to work across the spectrum of production – from farming to processing to marketing and business roles,” Mr Vitasovich said. . .

Final decision on King Salmon released by EPA

The EPA’s Board of Inquiry has issued its final decision on the King Salmon applications today, approving four out of nine salmon farms in the Marlborough Sounds.

“An earlier draft decision announced that 5 of the 9 nine sites would be refused consent and approvals given for 4 sites. This final decision doesn’t change anything in that respect,” said EDS Chairman Gary Taylor.

“We acknowledge that the Board has declined consent for 5 sites but it has not gone far enough.

“The areas the industrial scale consented farms are to be located in are highly natural and in prominent locations in the iconic and internationally renowned Marlborough Sounds. . .

Fonterra And A-Ware Food Group Confirm European Partnership:

New Zealand-based Fonterra and Netherlands-based A-ware Food Group have given the green light to develop a new cheese plant and dairy ingredients plant in Heerenveen in the north of the Netherlands.

Fonterra CEO Theo Spierings and A-ware Food Group CEO Jan Anker have today confirmed the partnership would proceed and signed a final agreement.

Under the agreement a greenfields site will be developed where A-ware will operate a cheese plant and Fonterra will operate a dairy ingredients plant alongside it. Cheese will be produced for A-ware’s customers in Europe and the whey and lactose produced will be processed into premium nutrition dairy ingredients for Fonterra’s global customer base. . .

Wools Of New Zealand Closes Capital Raise:

Wools of New Zealand has closed its capital raise with more than 700 applications for shares totalling approximately $6 million, representing approximately 14.5 million kilograms of annual strong wool production and a five-year marketing commitment.

As a 100% grower owned company, Wools of New Zealand is now positioned to drive its commercial, market-pull strategy, for the benefit of its shareholders.

Mark Shadbolt, chairman of Wools of New Zealand, said there had been a lot of late interest right up to the close of the offer. . .


Never let a chance go by

December 20, 2012

Twenty people have been poisoned after eating shellfish collected in the Bay of Plenty area in the past week.

And Aquaculture New Zealand puts out a media release:

Farmed New Zealand Greenshell Mussels and Pacific Oysters on sale at local supermarkets and seafood retailers are delicious, nutritious and 100 per cent safe to eat.

Aquaculture New Zealand chairman Peter Vitasovich has assured New Zealanders they can enjoy locally farmed shellfish these holidays with absolute confidence.

“New Zealand marine farmers operate one of the world’s strictest seafood quality assurance programmes, meeting the standards set by the New Zealand Ministry for Primary Industries, United States Food and Drug Administration and the European Union,” Mr Vitasovich said.

“Both the shellfish, and the water in which they are grown are rigorously tested before harvesting takes place.

“Fresh, sustainable, delicious, nutritious – Greenshell Mussels and Pacific Oysters are the taste of summer, proudly grown in your back yard.

“New Zealanders can enjoy farmed mussels and oysters knowing they are eating the safest shellfish in the world.”

Coincidence?

I don’t think so and that’s not a criticism.

Good businesses never let a chance go by.


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