Rural round-up

August 14, 2015

Support extended for drought-affected South Island:

Support for the drought-affected eastern South Island has been extended with an extra $100,000 for Rural Support Trusts and the medium scale event officially extended to February next year, Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy has announced today.

Mr Guy met with local farmers in the Hurunui district today and says North Canterbury is the worst affected region with little rainfall all year, despite being well into winter.

“North Canterbury, Southern Marlborough and parts of South Canterbury and Otago continue to experience very dry conditions. Pasture growth is well behind normal for this time of year and with lambing and calving starting, the situation remains serious for some,” says Mr Guy. . . 

Low stress the key to success at Whangara – Kate Taylor:

Robbie and Kristin Kirkpatrick’s eyes light up when they talk about the opportunities they have been given at Whangara Angus since 2009.

The business is owned by Patrick Lane but is still officially Lane Bros after Patrick’s father and uncle who bought the first part of the farm in 1929.  Whangara Angus was formed in 1966.

Robbie started working as a shepherd at the station, north of Gisborne, six years ago and is now managing the 1800ha property. . . 

Mushroom battle faces more delays –  Patrick O’Sullivan:

Te Mata Mushroom Company has accused Hawke’s Bay Regional Council of keeping it in the dark.

The council is prosecuting Te Mata for six allegedly smelly discharges between March and April.

The 48-year-old Havelock North company has been the subject of regular complaints from a nearby new housing development about the odour it produces when making compost. . . 

Rebuild of US beef cow herd will hit NZ:

New Zealand’s beef prices could fall as the United States rebuilds up its beef herds.

A new Rabobank report suggests the US is well on its way to rebuilding its herds as it recovers from a drought which has lasted since 2011.

It is expected to reduce the demand and record prices for New Zealand beef in this country’s biggest market.

The report – Beef cow repopulation, the case for diversification – showed the US beef industry expected to grow by 3,000,000 head of cattle in the next three to five years. . . .

New technology for sustainable snapper fishing:

The New Zealand seafood industry makes a serious commitment to the sustainability of our fisheries through significant investments in world-leading technologies, Chief Executive Tim Pankhurst says.

He was commenting on today’s announcement that fishing companies Aotearoa Fisheries, Sanford and Leigh Fish are stepping up their efforts to bring greater transparency into the inshore fleet. The companies are some of the first to commit to fitting vessel monitoring systems (VMS) on all vessels within their fleets that are part of the snapper fishery operating on the east coast of the North Island from the far north to the bottom of the Bay of Plenty. . . 

Hawke’s Bay Viticulturist Encourages Other Farmers and Growers to Enter East Coast Ballance Farm Environment Awards:

Winning a category award in the East Coast Ballance Farm Environment Awards was a nice little pat on the back for viticulturist Steve Wheeler and his employer, Mission Estate Winery.

Steve manages 33ha of vines for Mission Estate, one of New Zealand’s oldest and most well-known wine producers.

Based near Napier and owned by Marist Holdings Ltd, the winery prides itself on “delivering excellent wine to consumers in a way that enables the natural environment, the businesses and the communities involved to thrive”.

“Mission Estate has being doing some great work in the sustainability field,” Steve says, “so entering the Ballance Farm Environment Awards (BFEA) was an excellent way to showcase this work and to encourage others to do the same.” . . 


Rural round-up

December 15, 2014

Commission releases final report on statutory review of Fonterra’s 2014/15 Milk Price Manual:

The Commerce Commission today released its final report on its statutory review of Fonterra’s Milk Price Manual (the Manual) for the 2014/15 dairy season. The Manual sets out the rules for how Fonterra will calculate the amount it will pay dairy farmers for raw milk this season. This is called the base milk price.

The Commission is required to report each dairy season on the extent to which the Manual promotes the setting of a base milk price that provides incentives for Fonterra to operate efficiently, while providing for contestability in the market for the purchase of milk from farmers.

This is the first of two statutory reviews that the Commission is required to undertake each dairy season under the Dairy Industry Restructuring Act 2001 (DIRA). . .

 

Fonterra back Mymilk for more milk:

Fonterra has today launched a separate milk sourcing subsidiary to grow market share in its New Zealand milk pool, and provide a new pathway to membership in the Co-operative.

Called mymilkTM, it will initially invite applications, from farms in the Canterbury, Otago and Southland regions that are not currently supplying Fonterra, for one year contracts, renewable for a maximum of five years, without the obligation to purchase Fonterra shares. At any time mymilkTM suppliers can apply to join the Co-operative, purchase shares and supply Fonterra directly.
Fonterra Chairman John Wilson said: “It is good for the Co-operative and the country for Fonterra to be the first name on the list for farmers considering their supply options. We know there are farmers who support the co-operative model, but are at the stage of development where sharing up is currently beyond their financial reach. . .

Fonterra Shareholders Council gives nod ‘with caveats’ to new milk supply plan – Fiona Rotherham:

(BusinessDesk) – The Fonterra Shareholders Council is “broadly supportive” of plans for the cooperative to start sourcing milk from South Island suppliers who are not also shareholders, with a couple of caveats.

Fonterra Cooperative Group, the world’s largest dairy exporter, yesterday announced a new milk sourcing subsidiary, mymilk, which would try to get milk in the Canterbury, Otago, and Southland regions where competition for milk supply is most intense from new suppliers on contracts on up to five years without the obligation to purchase shares. The feedback, particularly from new farmers who have recently spent a large amount of money converting farms to dairy, is that they can’t currently afford to now buy shares in the cooperative but would do so at a later date.

Shareholders Council chairman Ian Brown said the competition for milk supply at the farmgate was one of the biggest changes he’d seen in his farming career. “It’s a changed mindset to how to attract suppliers whereas in the old days it was what to do with new supply. That’s a mindset shift.” . . .

 

Mymilk likely to get up noses of Fonterra shareholders – Allan Barber:

Fonterra has launched a new company called mymilkTM which is specifically designed to attract supply from South Island dairy farmers who don’t currently supply Fonterra. The website says it’s cooperative, but that’s a bit hard to see when the supplier has no obligation to buy any shares within five years and only has to sign a one year contract.

The website also says somewhat cutely the company is ‘backed’ by Fonterra, when it is actually a wholly owned subsidiary. This new venture is no doubt directed at tempting Synlait and Westland suppliers to jump ship without having to stump up with any share capital (at least for five years).

It promises competitive payment – competitive with whom? Fonterra or one of the others? But it is not clear exactly how mymilkTM will avoid paying the same price or even a higher one (shades of meat industry schedule premiums) to secure a new sign up. Under Trading Among Farmers, it is expressly forbidden for Fonterra to have different classes of shareholders and under cooperative principles equality of payment is sacrosanct. . .

RBNZ sees 44% bounce in whole milk powder in 2015 – Paul McBeth:

 (BusinessDesk) – The Reserve Bank expects whole milk powder prices to rise by about 44 percent next year as the slump in global prices this year prompts less competitive processors to scale back their production in the face of smaller returns.

The central bank expects whole milk powder, which is New Zealand’s dominant dairy export, to rise to US$3,200 a metric tonne by early 2016, from its current price of US$2,229/tonne as international producers who were lured by record prices last year are squeezed out by this year’s decline, governor Graeme Wheeler told Parliament’s finance and expenditure select committee after this morning’s monetary policy statement.

New Zealand’s advantage is that it’s the most competitive dairy producer in the world and can operate with lower prices than its rivals, he said. . .

 

Sponsors provide choice cuts for Gate-to-Plate competition:

Cabernet Foods is the latest Gate-to-Plate sponsor to offer competition organisers added value – over and above a core contribution.

The Gladstone-based company has said, for every lamb that any 2015 Gate-to-Plate contestant consigns direct to Cabernet Foods (from 21st February 2015 to 20th February 2016), the business will donate $1 to the Masterton A&P Association to help further develop the Gate-to-Plate competition.

Lyndon Everton, Cabernet’s Managing Director, says, “This competition has the ability to showcase the Wairarapa’s primary sector not only on local menus but also nationally.

“The Gate to plate attachment to the A&P show is a fantastic opportunity for the pastoral farmer to win the hearts and minds of their urban cousins.” . . .

Aotearoa Fisheries back in black in 2014 as Sealord returns to profit – Paul McBeth:

 (BusinessDesk) – Aotearoa Fisheries, which manages more than $530 million of fisheries assets for its iwi shareholders, returned to profit in the 2014 financial year after its major investment, Sealord group, was back in black after exiting its unprofitable South American business.

The Auckland-based company reported a profit of $21.9 million in the 12 months ended Sept. 30, turning around a loss of $6 million a year earlier, it said in a statement. That was largely due to a $12.7 million contribution from Sealord, which Aotearoa Fisheries jointly owns with Japan’s Nippon Suisan Kaisha. Sealord posted a loss of $44.3 million in 2013, reflecting a $46.9 million loss on the sale of its Argentine business.

“Aotearoa Fisheries own divisions were ahead of target which is pleasing under difficult operating conditions like the exchange rate and soft demand for paua in Asia,” chief executive Carl Carrington said. “This year our business will ramp up efforts in becoming a leader in sustainability which is wholly in line with our tikanga. There is no question that our long term future hinges on how well we perform in this area.” . . .

Wool Firm For Better Styles:

New Zealand Wool Services International Limited’s General Manager, Mr John Dawson reports that the 6,000 bales of North Island wool at auction this week saw a 95 percent clearance with good style wools holding their ground and poorer styles easing.

The weighted indicator for the main trading currencies was 0.56 percent stronger but had minimal impact on the market with supply/demand factors being the current market driver.

Mr Dawson advises that full length Fine Crossbred Fleece was firm to 3.5 percent dearer with shorter types generally firm to 2 percent easier. . .

 

 


Precision Seafood Harvesting unveiled

October 2, 2013

New Zealand technology is set to revolutionise the international fishing industry.

Imagine if every fish landed on a trawler was alive, in perfect condition and small fish, sharks and other species could be safely released underwater before a catch was lifted on-board.

The first underwater images ever released of revolutionary New Zealand fishing technology show how a partnership between New Zealand scientists and three Kiwi fishing companies will radically change the global fishing industry and make that a reality for wildfish harvesting.

The technology known as ‘Precision Seafood Harvesting’ does away with traditional trawl nets and, instead, sees fish contained and swimming comfortably underwater inside a large flexible PVC liner where they can be sorted for the correct size and species before being brought on-board the fishing vessel.

The break-through design of the harvesting system allows fishing vessels to target specific species and fish size and greatly increases protection for small fish that can swim free through ‘escape portals’ and non-target fish (by-catch), which are released unharmed.

 New Zealand Snapper in PSH Technology

Once on the deck, the fish are still swimming inside the liner, in perfect condition, meaning fresher, more sustainable fish for consumers and higher value products for fishing companies using the technology.

Precision Seafood Harvesting is the commercialisation phase of nearly ten years of New Zealand research. Fishing companies Aotearoa Fisheries, Sanford and Sealord are investing $26 million into the project under a Primary Growth Partnership with the New Zealand Government, which is matching the industry investment. Scientists at Plant & Food Research are partnering with the fishing companies to develop and trial the technology on commercial fishing vessels.

Sanford CEO and Chairman of Seafood New Zealand, Eric Barratt, who unveiled the new technology for the first time to the New Zealand fishing industry at its annual conference in Auckland today, says the Precision Seafood Harvesting programme was set up in April 2012 and will run for six years to commercialise new technology in the New Zealand fishing industry.

“This is the biggest step forward for commercial fishing in 150 years. What we’ve developed in New Zealand has huge benefits for fish stocks, the environment, consumers and New Zealand’s seafood industry. In the process we’re set to change the global fishing industry for the better.”

Alistair Jerrett, from Plant and Food Research says the new way of harvesting wildfish is a close collaboration between his team and the New Zealand seafood industry ‘who want to do things better’. “This is New Zealand science in action and the industry partners deserve a pat on the back for bringing fishing into the 21st century.”

Jerrett’s team built their own underwater cameras to see into traditional trawl nets. He says the ‘aha moment’ was asking: “Why do we have to strain these fish out, why do we have to exhaust them, why do we have to damage them during harvest – the new system changes all of that.

“One of the objectives is to make sure that any animal that reaches the surface, if we can’t select it out underwater, is delivered back to the sea unharmed.” He says this is true for bigger animals as well, like rays, sharks or any animal that is inadvertently captured.

“In terms of selectivity we design everything to make sure unwanted animals are discharged as fast as possible at depth – we don’t want them to even see the light of day.”

“When you realise you can design a highly selective harvest, you are winning in many different ways. You’re winning in unexplored properties, values we haven’t realised, and you’re producing a humane harvesting system.”

The head of Aotearoa Fisheries, Carl Carrington says it’s good news for sustainability by improving New Zealand’s credentials and “enhances our access to sustainability-conscious consumers, improves product taste and quality, and is good for value growth”.

That’s echoed by Sealord CEO, Graham Stuart who believes Precision Harvesting is an opportunity for New Zealand to ‘lead the world with another great kiwi innovation’. “Seeing Hoki landed from a depth of 300 meters, alive and in fantastic condition is remarkable and will totally change how our fish are brought to market.”

Sanford, Sealord and Aotearoa have been actively trialing the new technology on their fishing vessels for the past six months. Vessel Manager at Aotearoa Fisheries, Nathan Reid says fisherman onboard their vessels are excited about the condition of the fish when they are landed. “Replacing old trawl technology is really important for the industry. We’re going to see better stock recruitment and better stock in the water – it’s better for everyone.”

Sealord too is seeing the positive impact of the technology on its crews. Bill Healey is the Vessel Manager for Sealord. He says crews were sceptical at first, but that’s all changed. “When we talk to them now, when we see their reactions to the fish coming up, we know we’re onto something. I know we’re doing something unique and great when I look at the crews”.

Greg Johansson from Sanford says the new harvesting technology is just the start. “This will lead on to changes in vessel designs and layouts, the way we handle fish and get it to consumers. The opportunities are endless.”

“The customers should really enjoy the story of how this fish was caught, the sustainability, the environmental impact of this technology versus other forms of harvesting.

“This will increase the value of all New Zealand seafood products when the global markets see that we’re taking a big step forward by using a more environmentally-friendly way of harvesting fish.”

Recreational fisher and host of the popular “Gone Fishin” television show, Graeme Sinclair has seen the technology in action and says it’s ‘the future of commercial fishing.’ Sinclair says there’s a tendency with recreational anglers to assume that the commercial industry is not doing anything about problems such as dumping and mortality.

“I’ve seen some innovations and some clever buggers in my time, and I think this is revolutionary: it’s Kiwi, it’s clearly innovative, and what it does for mortality and for targeting specific species is incredibly exciting. It alleviates a whole lot of issues all in one hit.”

Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy has welcomed the technology, which was developed through the Government’s Primary Growth Partnership (PGP) scheme.

“The Precision Seafood Harvesting project is developing new net technology which is world-leading. It has the potential for huge economic and environmental benefits. . . .

“New high-tech equipment is being developed, with the aim of allowing fish to be sorted by size and species before even leaving the water.

“This will allow smaller and non-targeted fish to escape, reducing wastage and by-catch. At the same time it allows fish to be landed healthier and in better condition, which will improve their value.

“Being able to target specific fish has the potential to revolutionise commercial fishing,” says Mr Guy.

This is an amazing development which will change the seafood industry internationally, make commercial fishing much more sustainable and provide a significant economic boost for New Zealand.


Rural round-up

February 15, 2013

Rabobank Agribusiness Monthly February 2013:

The report covers all the major agricultural sectors that are important to New Zealand and Australia as well as covering off the latest economic, retail and currency developments.

Key highlights:

• The early stages of 2013 have brought some weather extremes across New Zealand and Australia. The latest outlook paints more of a normal picture for upcoming autumn seasonal conditions.
• Dairy commodity prices continue to trend higher with fundamentals slowly coming back into better balance. Markets are closely watching the dry weather in New Zealand’s North Island, which is taking its toll on milk flows.
• Effective February 1, Japanese beef import protocols will allow US beef exporters to source cattle up to the age of 30 months (previously 20 months) for export into the Japanese market.
• Record low US corn and soybean stocks continue to drive global grain markets. Australian prices continue to hold at historically strong basis levels.

The full report is here.

Eco-Warrior To Speak At Dairy Women’s Conference:

Three-time Ballance Farm Environment Award winner Dan Steele is on a mission to make New Zealand a better place for the future. In March he’s fronting up to hundreds of dairying women at their annual conference in Nelson to explain why he believes farmers and conservationists need to work together to ensure we have productive and sustainable farms to live and work on in the future.

Dan is a typical kiwi bloke. He’s a bushman, hunter, traveller, farmer, conservationist and business man. He’s been on his OE. He’s also used kiwi ingenuity to think outside the square and create an award-winning eco-tourism business – Blue Duck Station.

Blue Duck is an outdoor enthusiast’s playground located on the banks of the Whanganui and Retaruke rivers in the Ruapehu district. The Station is surrounded by Whanganui National park. . .

All forests to be monitored for foreign bugs:

All forest plantations will be brought into a nationwide forest health surveillance scheme if next month’s referendum of forest growers is successful.

“A yes vote in the referendum will see a small compulsory levy applied to harvested logs. Broadening the reach of the surveillance scheme will be one of the big benefits,” says Paul Nicholls, a Forest Growers Levy Trust board member.

“Forests owned by members of the Forest Owners Association have been monitored for exotic pests and diseases for more than 50 years. But new bugs don’t discriminate. We need to be monitoring forests on the basis of a scientific assessment of risk, not because they are owned by a member of an industry association.” . .

Iwi owned oyster business cements partnership with Cawthron Institute:

Iwi owned seafood company Aotearoa Fisheries Ltd this week signed an agreement with Cawthron Institute in respect to their Pacific oyster hatchery and oyster nursery based at Glenduan, north of Nelson. Under the agreement Aotearoa Fisheries will take over the Pacific oyster Nursery and Spat growing operations. Three of Cawthron Institute’s staff involved in the Nursery and growing operations will be seconded to Aotearoa Fisheries. Cawthron Institute will continue to spawn and produce Pacific oyster larvae at the site.

Aotearoa Fisheries is one of New Zealand’s largest fishing and seafood businesses and is the largest Pacific oyster company in New Zealand, trading as Kia Ora Seafoods and Pacific Marine Farms. This deal follows on from Aotearoa Fisheries acquisition of Sanford NZ Limited’s North Island Pacific oyster farms last year. . .

LIC lifts first-half profit 7.3 percent as dairy farmers ramp up investment:

Livestock Improvement Corp, which compensated some farmers for selling bull semen that caused ‘hairy calf’ mutations, increased first-half profit 7.3 percent as dairy farmers raised their herd investment, even as farmgate prices fell.

Net profit rose to $30 million, or $1.017 a share, in the six months ended Nov. 30, from $28 million, or 94.7 cents, a year earlier, the Hamilton-based company said in a statement. Sales rose 9.6 percent to $131.5 million, though LIC typically gets most of its revenue in the first half of the financial year and doesn’t recognise costs until the second half. . .

Lempriere reaches 90% of Wool Services International, hitting mop-up target:

Australian wool merchant Lempriere has reached the 90 percent target of Wool Services International, allowing it to mop-up the remaining shares.

The Melbourne-based company reached 90.9 percent of acceptances yesterday, according to a substantial security holder notice, meeting its minimum acceptance and letting it compulsorily acquire the remaining shares in the company.

Lempriere launched the takeover last year, offering 45 cents a share, valuing WSI at $31 million, a 22 percent premium to the trading price before the offer emerged. The shares last traded in January at 42 cents. . .

Survey reveals Scottish farming’s 2013 challenges – Gemma Mackenzie:

Confidence in Scottish agriculture remains high, despite falling profitability, harsh weather and poor lamb prices.

According to the Bank of Scotland’s annual agricultural report, only 11% of 474 respondents said they thought the industry was prosperous in 2012 – a drop of eight percentage points compared to the previous year.

Although only 59% expected to be profitable this year, 28% of farmers were optimistic about the future of the industry; the second highest level since the survey began 17 years ago.

KEY FINDINGS

• 85% of farmers were profitable in the last financial year – two percentage points lower than previous year
• Only 59% expected to be profitable in 2013 . . .

NFU Scotland calls for daiy contingency plan – Gemma Mackenzie:

NFU Scotland has called on the UK government to prepare a contingency plan for the dairy industry as the voluntary code of practice has not been as effective as hoped.

At a meeting with farm minister David Heath last week, president Nigel Miller said the voluntary dairy code of practice had not worked as well as it should have, and it was time to develop a plan B.

“NFUS is pushing for the UK goverment to explore a contingency plan, including legislation, in case the code fails to achieve its intentions. NFUS maintains that the best way of strengthening and developing the dairy market at home and abroad is to increase trust in the supply chain,” said Mr Miller. . .

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Rural round-up

July 8, 2012

1080 doesn’t contaminate waterways new study shows:

New research by NIWA scientists shows 1080 poison does not contaminate waterways.

1080 is used throughout New Zealand to control animal pests – mainly possums – which spread the livestock disease bovine tuberculosis.

Over the past three months, scientists have placed large amounts of 1080 in a trial catchment on the West Coast and then simulated rainfall in the area.

The aim is to understand how 1080 – a natural toxin – moves through or across soil into waterways and if the run-off degrades the quality of water.

Dr Alastair Suren is the freshwater ecologist who led the research and says the study found that during rainfall 1080 diluted to the point where it became nearly undetectable. . .

Rabobank runs masterclass – Hugh Stringleman:

Some “scary numbers” on world food security were addressed by 50 participants, including six New Zealanders, in the inaugural Global Masterclass held by Rabobank in the home country, Netherlands.

Speakers from the United Nations and giant agribusinesses such as Unilever and Cargill impressed upon North Island sheep, beef and deer farmer William Oliver the need for greater efficiency in farming with labour, energy and capital.

“I came home to see the opportunity in everything and bring more passion and inspiration to my farming,” Oliver said.

The theme of the vent was to promote rural entrepreneurship to fill the world’s food needs . .

My farmer was one of the six New Zealanders at the Masterclass. You can read more about it here and here.

Pear investment coming up rosy – Peter Watson:

In more than 30 years growing pipfruit, Bruce Fraser hasn’t seen a pear with such promise.

Shaped more like an apple and bright red, PremP109 has been stirring up a storm since being released in tiny amounts last year.

Dubbed a “papple” in Britain, it has been selling at Marks and Spencer stores for an eyewatering 1GBP (NZ$2.10) a piece and returning growers back here more than $100 an 18kg carton, a staggering sum at a time of hardship in the industry. . .

Fontera eyes up Studholme plant – Andrea Fox:

The small size of New Zealand Dairy’s Studholme plant means it is well-suited for use in short and specialised manufacturing runs, Fonterra says in an application eyeing up the factory.

Fonterra has a deal to buy the dairy-processing assets of New Zealand Dairies, which is in receivership. But while awaiting a Commerce Commission decision, the dairy giant wants to buy the milk of the failed company’s contracted farmers and operate the plant.

Exporter New Zealand Dairies was founded six years ago to build a wholemilk powder processing plan on 55ha at Studholme. The plant was commissioned in 2007 at a cost of $108m. . .

Winemaker introduces smaller bottles:

Mission Estate has been commended by anti-alcohol campaigners for introducing New Zealand’s first 500ml bottle of wine.

The Hawke’s Bay winery, the nation’s oldest, is now selling sauvignon blanc and syrah in the smaller bottles in a bid to make wine more attractive to modern lifestyles. The standard bottle of wine is 750ml, or 7.7 standard drinks.

Mission chief executive Peter Holley and winemaker Paul Mooney read research that showed New Zealanders were becoming older, increasingly urban and living in smaller family units. . .

Sanford sells virus hit Northland oyster farms  –

Fishing company Sanford has sold its Pacific oyster farms in Northland to Aotearoa Fisheries.

Sanford closed its Kaeo processing plant in December because of a virus that killed many of the juvenile oysters and the likely reduced oyster harvest.

Despite having confidence that there was potential to breed new oysters that have some resilience to this virus, it had decided that it made more sense for it to concentrate on its expanded Greenshell mussel business, Sandford said. . .

“Meating” of minds on advancing sector – Shaan Te Kani:

INDUSTRY ORGANISATIONS and commercial companies will work much more closely together in future, says Beef + Lamb NZ chairman Mike Petersen.

“There has been a bit of discussion certainly since Keith Cooper’s resignation from our board around election time – about the value of industry organisations,” Petersen said at the Federated Farmers conference in Auckland.

“Our view is we are a farmers’ organisation…. It should be up to the farmers to decide whether they want to invest in research programmes, extension work, economic anaylysis, skills and trade programme or market access. . .

Growers fear limits to their water take

SETTING limits on irrigation use in the Poverty Bay Flats was one of the main concerns raised by farmers and growers at the Fresh Water Advisory Group community meeting yesterday.

More than 50 people attended the meeting at Bushmere Arms, which discussed the draft freshwater management plan with Waipaoa users.

Advisory group representatives delivered the plan’s vision, which is to ensure the long-term sustainability of freshwater resources as well as considering economic and social activities. . .

So You Think (NZ) Reitred to stud:

The curtains have been pulled on the racing career of one of New Zealand’s most successful racehorses seen in recent times with the New Zealand bred Karaka graduate So You Think (NZ)officially retired to stud.

Announced by Coolmore yesterday, So You Think (High Chaparral x Triassic) has subsequently been withdrawn from Sunday morning’s Group 1 Eclipse Stakes where he was odds on to claim his 11th Group 1 race.

The son of High Chaparral was found to be lame after exercising yesterday morning in Ireland and it appears he has pulled a muscle in his hind quarter which precludes him from running in the Eclipse Stakes. So You Think will enter quarantine this week as originally planned before making his trip back to Australia to commence stud duties. . .

Potatoes NZ welcomes step towards fresh potato exports:

Potatoes New Zealand has welcomed an Australian Government draft report which is expected to open the door to the export of fresh potatoes for processing from New Zealand to Australia.

The Australian Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry (DAFF) draft report proposes that the importation of fresh potatoes for processing into Australia from New Zealand be permitted subject to import conditions.

Potatoes New Zealand Chairman Stuart Wright said that the news was very encouraging for the New Zealand potato industry and it was hoped the Australian market could be open to New Zealand for the 2012-13 season. . .


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