Rural round-up

January 31, 2015

Rabobank Agribusiness Outlook 2015

The 2015 Agribusiness Outlook shares Rabobank’s view for New Zealand agriculture in 2015. It includes four key swing factors that will be critical in shaping the outlook for 2015, addresses the significant price drivers for agricultural commodities and outlines the sectoral trends and developments that will be important to watch in 2015.

Key highlights

Outlook 2015

• Dairy – Lower global milk supply and demand gradually improving should be enough underpin a modest price recovery in 2015

• Beef – Much tighter supply from Australia, combined with strong demand from the US, will support historically high farmgate and export prices in 2015 . . .

 Tri-Lamb Group working to put lamb on the menu in the US:

Beef + Lamb New Zealand (B+LNZ) is working together with its sheep farming counterparts from the US and Australia to get Americans eating more lamb.

B+LNZ’s Central South Island Director Anne Munro has just been at the annual Tri-Lamb Group conference in Nevada with B+LNZ’s North America Manager Terry Meikle and Federated Farmers’Meat & Fibre Industry Group Chairperson Rick Powdrell. Representatives from the Sheepmeat Council of Australia (SCA) and the American Sheep Industry Association (ASI) also took part.

The Tri-Lamb Group was established in 2004 to grow demand for sheepmeat in the US, mainly by increasing consumers’ awareness of lamb’s nutritional value. . .  

 Planting a winner – how to protect farm waterways:

How to get the best results from planting waterways and avoid the common pitfalls will be the focus of a DairyNZ and Tatua field day on February 13 at the Tatua farm in Tatuanui.

Representatives from DairyNZ, Tatua and Waikato Regional Council will be answering farmers’ questions and providing advice on how to successfully plant farm waterways.

As part of the Sustainable Dairying Water Accord, all dairy farms must have stock excluded from waterways by 31 May 2017, and a planting plan for stream banks by 2020. The accord covers all dairy farms and is supported by all dairy companies across the country.

DairyNZ water quality scientist, Tom Stephens, who will be talking at the field day, says the focus will be on helping to ensure farmers get value for money from their planting while making the most of the environmental benefits. . .

 

Farming clean streams:

Ballance Agri-Nutrients has launched a specialist team to help farmers navigate increasingly complex environmental regulations and consent requirements to promote clean green land, rivers and streams.

Alastair Taylor, the new Business Extension Services Manager at Ballance Agri-Nutrients said national programmes such as the Sustainable Dairying Water Accord are putting increased pressure on farmers to manage the nutrients within the farmgate.

“Farmers need to navigate through regulations around effluent management, nutrient use and environmental performance. Our new team will provide a direct link between farmers and regional councils to take the hassle out of environmental compliance. . .

 

Right diet helps cows keep their cool:

Choosing the right supplementary feed can help farmers turn down the heat in their cows’ digestive systems as hot, humid summer conditions increase the risk of heat stress in herds.

Science Extension Officer for animal nutrition company SealesWinslow, Sarah Morgan, says all cows generate heat when they digest feed, but feeds requiring less energy to digest will also result in less heat generated and more comfortable cows as the average daytime temperatures stay high.

“Fibre produces more heat in the rumen than other carbohydrate feed sources. Feeds that have high oil content also require more energy to digest and reduce the efficiency of nutrient metabolism. Low fibre feed sources usually result in less heat from digestion than feeds that are higher in fibre.” . .

 

Strong Interest in New Zealand Bloodstock at Karaka Sales:

This week’s Karaka bloodstock sales can expect to see a nice swing to top-end colts that will eventually make their mark in the stud market, says Geoff Roan, Bloodstock Client Manager for Crowe Horwath.

“In part this reflects the influences of the changes six years ago to the Income Tax Act, which accelerated write-downs on colts,” he said.

The market was also feeling the impact of the recent amendment to the Goods and Services Tax Act, allowing overseas entities to register for GST if they are registered in their own foreign territory and don’t have a taxable activity in New Zealand. . .

 


Rural round-up

August 25, 2012

Wet winter helping to spread killer kiwifruit infection – Jamie Morton:

The wettest winter some kiwifruit growers have seen is hampering efforts to stop Psa-V, at a time when the vine-killing disease is attacking New Zealand’s most popular variety.

The disease, which has ravaged gold kiwifruit orchards throughout the country since its discovery in Te Puke two years ago, is now being seen in a spate of serious cases among the green variety that makes up the bulk of the industry.

More than 60 orchards have notified industry group Kiwifruit Vine Health of possible Psa-V, and it is feared the disease could eventually reach up to half of New Zealand’s green kiwifruit growers. . .

Beef + Lamb New Zealand working for farmers to get more Americans eating lamb

Two Beef + Lamb New Zealand farmer directors are meeting with the project partners involved with the Tri-Lamb Group which has a goal to get more Americans eating lamb.

Central South Island Director, Anne Munro and Southern South Island Director, Leon Black are in Idaho, representing New Zealand sheep farmers alongside their fellow Tri- Lamb Group representatives from Australia and the United States.

Beef + Lamb New Zealand CEO, Dr Scott Champion said the collaborative promotion by the three sheep producing nations is built around the understanding that the profitability and sustainability of the lamb market in the US is important for farmers in all three countries. . .

Unlike humans, fat bees are healthy bees:

Federated Farmers is highlighting how everyone can make a difference to whether bees are healthily ‘fat’ or sickly skinny.

“Just like with all livestock, the health of bees reflects the protein and energy sources available to them,” says John Hartnell, Federated Farmers Bees spokesperson and an exporter of bee products.

“Good protein and nectar produces fat bees and in nature, fat bees are healthy bees. Federated Farmers I guess is standing up for the right of bees to become fat.

“We are keen to work with anyone and everyone to provide positive environments for the honeybee to flourish. 

“After several years’ work, Federated Farmers Trees for Bees now has ten regional planting guides available for anyone to create a bee friendly space.  While they are available from a number of websites, all you have to do is type “trees for bees” into Google. . .

Varroa is not the only threat to our honey bees – Bruce Wills:

In 2000, the sum of all fears for New Zealand’s beekeepers took place when the Varroa Destructor Mite was confirmed in Auckland.

A mere six years later, Varroa had jumped the Cook Strait to reach Nelson and progressively, over the past six years, has spread south.

This year it reached as south as you can travel in mainland New Zealand; Bluff. If it wasn’t for human intervention, the economic and agronomic effects of Varroa would be like Foot & Mouth disease.

Our economy and farming system depends on honeybees and a pollination workforce involving some 430,000 hives.

While people may judge the bee industry by the honey they purchase at a farmer’s market or the supermarket, that is a drop in the bucket.

The real value of honeybees is as pollinators par-excellence. . .

Varroa spreads but the battle for bees goes on:

By reaching Bluff in the 12 years since the Varroa Mite was first confirmed in Auckland, one of the world’s worst bee threats is close to completing its colonisation of New Zealand.

“Has Varrora had an impact on New Zealand? Absolutely,” confirms John Hartnell, Federated Farmers Bees chairperson and a major exporter of bee products.

“If it wasn’t for human intervention, the economic and agronomic effects of Varroa would be like Foot & Mouth disease. Our economy and farming system depends on honeybees and a pollination workforce involving some 430,000 hives. . . .

“That should give pause for thought as we celebrate the Honey Bee this week and the massive contribution this mighty insect makes to us all. The value of pollination alone is conservatively estimated at $5 billion each year.

Forest industry transforming itself

The forest and wood processing industries are moving quickly on a strategy to transform the sector.

The Wood Council (Woodco) has just given the go-ahead to a $400,000 research-based initiative which aims to get the highest value out of every cubic metre of timber harvested. Known as Woodscape, it is modelled on a major study carried out for the Canadian forest products industry in 2009.

“In the next decade we will see an increase in the harvest. We are determined to extract the best value we can from this resource and reinvigorate our sector,” says Woodco chair Doug Ducker. . .

PGG Wrightson reports $55m turnaround in bottom line profits

Rural services leader PGG Wrightson Limited (NZX: PGW) has announced an improved operating performance with earnings before interest, tax and depreciation (EBITDA) for the year ended 30 June 2012 at $55.2m compared to $49.4m in the year ended June 2011.

Operating revenue was up 7.2% at $1,336.8m compared with $1,247.2m for 2011, while net profit after tax (NPAT) was at $24.5m, a $55.2m turnaround from the 2011 loss of $30.7m. A substantial turnaround in net operating cash flow to $58.6m (2011: $4.9m) reflected a strong focus on working capital and particularly debtor management, while enabling the company to reduce bank debt. Net interest costs were reduced to $13.8m from $28.1m for the prior period . .

New Zealand’s first Albariño wine awarded a Trophy on debut:

In 2011 one barrel of New Zealand’s first Albariño wine was made by Coopers Creek Vineyard and praised by wine critics. The second vintage has just been released and in its very first outing has been awarded a Trophy at the prestigious Bragato Wine Awards, held during the wine industry’s annual conference. The Select Vineyards Gisborne Albariño 2012 is available in restaurants and fine wine stores nationally. . .


Women win Meat Board elections

March 11, 2010

The board of Meat and Wool New Zealand  has two new directors – both of them women.

Anne Munro of Fairlie has beaten long-serving director David Douglas of North Otago in the Central South Island electorate and in the Western North Island, Kirsten Bryant of Fordell beat Tony Gray of Pohangina Valley. Sitting director Ron Frew hadn’t sought re-election in that electorate.

The defeat of a sitting director, following the vote against wool levies last year which means Meat & Wool will soon just be Meat, reinforces the message farmers aren’t happy.

However, I think M&W is bearing the brunt of farmer frustration with the industry as a whole and there’s little if anything M&W can do about that.


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