Rural round-up

July 31, 2015

Westland Milk cuts payout further as dairy prices fall – Suze Metherell:

(BusinessDesk) – Westland Milk Products, New Zealand’s second-largest dairy cooperative, cut its forecast milk payout to farmers by 10 cents for the current season and for next season’s by $1, in the face of sustained weakness in global dairy prices.

The Hokitika-based company will pay $4.80 to $4.90 per kilogram of milk solids for the 2014/15 season, with the final payout to be determined at the September board meeting, it said in a statement. The forecast payout for the 2015/16 season was slashed to between $4.60 and $5/kgMS, from a previously band of $5.60 to $6/kgMS.

The advance rate for this season remains at $4.80/kgMS, although the 2015/16 season rate was revised to $3.80/kgMS from $4.40/kgMS. . .

 

Light at the end of the paddock for dairy farmers – Jason Walls:

The New Zealand dollar is poised to shed more value against the US by the start of next year and dairy prices may only be at the current level temporarily.

This is good news for farmers, says ASB Bank rural economist Nathan Penny, who forecasts the New Zealand dollar will be at 61c against the US by the beginning of 2016.

He says the one of the biggest factors to this will be the US interest rate hike later this year. . .

Speech to Horticulture New Zealand Conference Award Dinner:

Good evening. Thank you Julian Raine, Horticulture New Zealand President, for that introduction. It is a pleasure to join you this evening in recognising excellence and future leaders of the horticulture industry.

I would particularly like to acknowledge outgoing Chief Executive Peter Silcock for all his contribution to the industry over the past 30 years.

Tonight I want to talk to you briefly about the long-term value that can be created by recognising talent and growing leaders.

A growing industry

Horticulture is a top performing primary industry. In the year to June 2015, export revenue reached $3.897 billion. This is up $602 million from 2012, a total of over 18 percent growth over four years. . .

 

Dairy modules hitting the spot for DWN members:

Dairy Women’s Network has received feedback on how its latest professional development offering is being perceived by its members – with impressive results.

The network launched its new Dairy Modules programme for the first time in November 2014 and has since had the programme evaluated by the renowned Net Promoter Score system, confirming world class standard. . .

 

Bayer Wairarapa Young Viticulturist of the Year 2015 announced:

A great win for Mark Langlands from Te Kairanga as he becomes the Bayer Wairarapa Young Viticulturist of the Year 2015. Contestants battled it out at Te Kairanga Vineyard with their final challenge being to deliver a speech to a key audience in the evening at the Martinborough Village Cafe.

Contestants completed a wide range of activities including questions on trellising, vine management, pests & diseases, budgeting, tractor maintenance and irrigation as well as having an interview and a quick fire buzzer round. . .

 

Wool Firms:

New Zealand Wool Services International Limited’s General Manager, Mr John Dawson reports that despite a slightly stronger New Zealand dollar wool prices were firm to slightly dearer. With less wool available due to weather affecting shearing and vacation related shipping requirements this has helped underpin prices.

The weighted indicator for the main trading currencies increased 0.99 percent week on week.

Of the 7,905 bales on offer 96.2 percent sold. . .

 

PERRIAM on national stage at New Zealand Fashion Week 2015:

Luxury merino fashion brand PERRIAM has been selected for a special showcase on wool in fashion at the prestigious New Zealand Fashion Week (NZFW) in August.

PERRIAM is among some of the country’s iconic labels chosen for the Choose Wool show, taking to the runway with Sabatini, twenty-seven names, Tanya Carlson, Hailwood, Liz Mitchell and Wynn Hamlyn on Tuesday, August 25.

Curated by leading Kiwi stylist Anna Caselberg, who is known for her work with NZ wools, Choose Wool represents an important aspect of the NZ fashion industry. . .

 


Rural round-up

July 14, 2015

NZInc, Australia Mall and China’s JD.com – Keith Woodford:

For the last four years I have been promoting the notion that we need an integrated approach to selling New Zealand food online in China. Now the Aussies have gone and beaten us with ‘Australia Mall’ on China’s JD.com.

Chinese buyers increasingly want to want to buy their food online. They want food that is processed in a Western country. They also want a one-stop online shop. And they want same day delivery.

All of the above consumer needs are increasingly being achieved by our competitors. We need to be there too. . .

$7.3m for agricultural research partnership:

The Government will invest $7.3 million over five years in an agricultural research partnership to improve pasture grasses and lift the performance of livestock farming, Science and Innovation Minister Steven Joyce and Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy announced today.

Pastoral Genomics is an industry-led research partnership between DairyNZ, Beef+Lamb NZ, Grasslands Innovation, NZ Agriseeds, DEEResearch, AgResearch, and Dairy Australia whose objective is to provide pastoral farmers with better forage cultivars that will increase productivity, profitability and environmental sustainability of New Zealand’s pastoral farming systems. . .

Risk-based approach mooted for bovine TB eradication  – Gerald Piddock:

Proposed changes for bovine tuberculosis management in New Zealand could see a risk-based approach adopted in deciding which livestock to test for the disease.

This meant shifting to a system where high TB risk areas would be targeted, a risk profile would be built around infected livestock. That profile would relate to the area, a herd’s history and the amount of stock movements. The higher the level of movements, the more risk there was of infection.

The Biosecurity Act required the plan to eradicate TB be formally reviewed on a regular basis. The proposed changes would come into effect in July 2016. . .

Designers carry the flag for wool:

The inspiring way in which Australia promotes wool used in its fashion and interiors sectors prompted Auckland fashion editor and stylist Anna Caselberg to initiate a fashion wool week this year – ‘Choose Wool 2015’.

The inaugural ‘We’re loving Wool’ week last year involved a number of New Zealand high fashion designers, with a major kick-off event – including sheep shearing – in the trendy Britomart precinct of Auckland. It was organised in conjunction with Elders Primary Wool. . .

Productivity and lifestyle meet at Bellingen – Nick Heydon:

AFTER time spent living in Hong Kong, Duncan and Fiona McDonald and their family planned to live at their North Coast grazing property “Glynravon”.

Mr McDonald purchased the property at Bellingen in 2008.

“Glynravon” was seen as an opportunity to set up a home base close to New England Girls School and The Armidale School, where Duncan and Fiona’s children were set to board.

“We decided on Bellingen so we could be close to the kids, close to the coast, and that it was easy to get to Sydney,” Mr McDonald said. . .

 Meat Slicer Nelson –Safer, More Efficient Meat Slicers on the Rise:

When dealing with fleshy goods, meat companies take utmost care in every part of the process. From raising the animals to their actual processing, butchers ensure complete sanitation in each step. All of them rely on heavy machinery to do much of all the heavy work, including slicing and packaging.

These two procedures have received much development in the recent years. Its involvement ensures clean meat reaches customers. As for the slicers, it’s just not about safety. People demand specific cuts for particular dishes. This means in addition to guaranteeing cleanliness, meat slicers have to be versatile and efficient.

Local Excellence

New Zealand can compete with the best meat and dairy producers in the world. With some of the most well looked after livestock, the Pacific nation exports top-class products guaranteed. Meat-loving countries demand constant supply of premium-grade meat from NZ’s prized farms and they cannot afford to disappoint. . .

 


Rural round-up

May 10, 2014

Conference to extol merits of goat meat – Annette Scott:

The benefits of goat meat to New Zealand red-meat farming businesses will be the focus of the NZ Goats inaugural conference this month.

The event is being held by the Federated Farmers goats industry group in conjunction with Meat Goat NZ and the NZ Boer Goat Breeders Association.

NZ Goats was established recently by Mohair NZ and Meat Goat NZ to add value to the NZ goat sector.

While there remained much do to rebuild and expand the goat meat and mohair industries, it needed to be remembered goat meat led global red meat consumption and it had a lot to offer NZ red-meat farming businesses, NZ Goats chairwoman Dawn Sangster said. . . .

Campaign taking wool to NZ’s main streets – Alan Williams:

Urban New Zealand is the target of a Campaign for Wool promotion in the last week of May.

About 40 designers and retailers have been brought together by fashion stylist Anna Caselberg for the We’re Loving Wool week, funded by Primary Wool Co-operative.

City buses are already carrying displays and the promotion will involve shop-front displays in Wellington, Christchurch, and a number of regional centres.

However, the base will be Britomart, in Auckland, where several of the fashion designers are based. . . .

The Future of Weed Management: Sustainable Agriculture Series

The recently released report Challenges for Pest Management in New Zealand by the Royal Society of New Zealand highlights the ongoing and substantial costs to agricultural productivity and the economic losses associated with weeds. When coupled with the ever-present challenge of the growing resistance of weeds to agrichemicals and herbicide deregistration, it becomes vital to explore and utilise new approaches and technologies in weed management.

In response to this need, Lincoln University, New Zealand’s specialist land-based University, in conjunction with the BHU Future Farming Centre, NZ’s leading specialist sustainable agriculture research centre, have created the Sustainable Agriculture Series of short courses designed to provide professional development for farmers, growers, or anyone involved in the primary sector; whether behind the farm gate or in research. . . .

Workshop explores ecosystems and the challenge of feeding the world :

Leading ecological and environmental scientists from around the world descended on Lincoln University and the Bio-protection Research Centre late April for an intensive week-long workshop.

Known as the Geographically Appropriate Integrated Agriculture Workshop (GAIA), its key objective was to develop and evaluate a range of scenarios for agricultural land use and management from the perspective of ecosystems and the fundamental services they provide.

The 23 participants in the workshop – stemming from countries such as Denmark, the United Kingdom, the United States, the Netherlands, Kenya and Australia – were using the workshop to build on developments in agroecology to estimate how many people the world can sustain without the current dependence on, and over-use of, both the earth’s water resources and fossil-fuel based chemicals such as fertilisers and pesticides. . .

 Hereford Haymaker to $41,000 – Jamie-Lee Oldfield:

IT ONLY took 17 lots to reach this year’s $41,000 top-price at the Hereford National Show and Sale in Wodonga today.

Sugarloaf Haymaker H126 was the bull, offered by Andrew and Serena Klippel, Sugarloaf Creek Herefords, Corryong, Vic, and purchased by Frank Hannigan, Franco Herefords, Casino.

By Glendan Park Empire E002, the 21-month old bull weighed 1046 kilograms with an eye muscle area (EMA) scan of 139.

The bull’s $41,000 price tag trumped last year’s top of $30,000, and led the way for an average of $6906 for the 112 bulls sold, with 144 offered. . .

Getting up close and personal with the big Panda – Art for Agriculture:

The 2014 Archibull Prize is off to a flying start with a new look program and lots of new, exciting and diverse young people for our young farming champions and school students to work along side

As this great article reminds us

Feeding the world today does not depend on the total food produced. At the global aggregate scale we currently have enough food to feed everyone. It depends on where this food is produced and at what price. Hunger today is a problem of insufficient access to nutritious food and not of insufficient food availability

And to quote the team at the Youth Food Movement

‘4 million tonnes of food is wasted in Australia each year. As someone who eats, buys and loves food, we all have the power to help stop this waste. It’s simply a matter of making our food choices count.’ . . .


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