Rural round-up

September 10, 2015

Number of TB infected herd numbers at all-time record low:

The number of bovine tuberculosis (TB) infected herds has dropped below 40 for the first time in the history of New Zealand’s TBfree programme delivered by OSPRI. According to this week’s figures, an all-time low of 36 herds were infected with bovine TB (34 cattle and two deer herds).

OSPRI Chief Executive, Michelle Edge, said ‘Reaching this milestone is a credit to farmers and the industry and Government organisations that are shareholders and investors in the TBfree programme and is a big step towards New Zealand becoming TB-free.’

Farmers, industry and Government partners working hand-in-hand with OSPRI have collaboratively made the programme one of the world’s leading TB control schemes. . . 

New Zealand’s Precision Seafood Harvesting Finalist In Global Seafood Champion Awards:

The new Precision Seafood Harvesting fishing technology being developed in New Zealand has today been announced as a finalist in Seaweb’s Seafood Champion Awards at Seafood Expo Asia in Hong Kong.

The Seafood Champion Awards annually recognise individuals and companies for outstanding leadership in promoting environmentally responsible seafood. PSH is a finalist in the Innovation category, which recognises efforts in advancing sustainability within the global seafood sector to effectively design products and processes with sustainability as a driving force. . . 

New Zealand Ambassador to Chair WTO Agriculture Negotiations

Trade Minister Tim Groser announced today that the members of the World Trade Organisation have appointed New Zealand’s WTO Ambassador, Vangelis Vitalis, as the new Chair of the WTO Doha Round agriculture negotiations.

Mr Vitalis was formally elected Chair at a meeting of the Special Session of the Committee on Agriculture held in Geneva today.

“I am very pleased that the WTO membership have once again underlined their trust and confidence in New Zealand’s WTO Ambassador for the role as Chair of the agriculture negotiations”, Mr Groser said. . . 

 

Fonterra Milk Volume Forecast:

Fonterra Co-operative Group Limited has maintained its milk volume forecast for the 2015-16 season at 1,589 million kgMS, which is in the range of 2-3 per cent lower than the amount collected last season.

Fonterra is required under the Dairy Industry Restructuring Act to update its current season forecast milk volumes by early September.

Group Director Co-operative Affairs Miles Hurrell said although Fonterra had forecast a 2-3 per cent decline in volumes there was evidence that farmers were pulling back on production, which could lead to a further downward revision of forecast volumes as we move through the season.

“Farmers are responding to the lower forecast Farmgate Milk Price by returning to more traditional farming practices. They are reducing the use of feed supplements, and lowering stocking rates per hectare as they concentrate on utilising pasture. . . 

 

Too many eggs in the whole milk powder (WMP) basket – Keith Woodford:

For some time there has been a view developing within New Zealand that we have too many eggs in the dairy basket. There is also a view that we are over-exposed to China.

I do not share those perspectives, at least when they are expressed in such over-arching and simplistic terms. In contrast, I note that dairy is one of the things we are good at, and that our pastoral dairy resources are not easily put to alternative profitable use.

Yes, we could go back to sheep production, but I do not know where we would profitably sell the increased meat volumes. For beef, there are markets, but most of our beef is a by-product of dairy. It is hard to make money from beef cows. . . 

Fonterra Opens New Manufacturing Facility In Indonesia:

Fonterra Co-operative Group Limited has officially opened its new blending and packing plant in Indonesia – its first manufacturing facility in the country.

Chairman John Wilson said the plant is Fonterra’s largest investment in ASEAN in the last decade and will support the growth of Fonterra’s brands – Anmum, Anlene and Anchor Boneeto – in Indonesia.

“Fonterra has been supplying high quality dairy nutrition to Indonesia for more than 30 years and today it is one of our most important global markets. The opening of our new plant is an exciting step forward in our relationship with the country and local dairy industry,” he said. . . 

Dairy Women’s Network conference details announced:

Dairy Women’s Network has decided to take its cue from the dairy industry and curtail its next annual conference, at a time that the industry and its members are hurting.

The Network had planned to hold the 2016 conference in Wellington over two full days in May.

“The Wellington location would have meant more people from the North Island needed to fly than if we held it in a central North Island location,” said de Villiers. . .

MPI and cruise industry to combat fruit fly risk:

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) will work closely with the cruise ship industry this season to manage biosecurity risk, especially fruit fly.

The cruise sector is expecting a record season, with passenger numbers forecast to jump 33% to 267,800.

“This, coupled with the enhanced fruit fly threat across the Tasman and other parts of the Pacific, has brought MPI and the cruise industry together to improve biosecurity,” says Stephanie Rowe, MPI’s Head of Intelligence and Operations. . . 


Anlene clean – Fonterra

October 31, 2008

Fonterra says independent tests  on its Anlene milk powder have found no traces of melamine.

Results today from the Health Sciences Authority in Singapore on samples from Bangladesh have come back negative,” said Fonterra’s director of group manufacturing, Gary Romano.

“There is no basis in fact for any speculation that Fonterra product sold under the Anlene brand is anything but the highest quality,” he said.

“We fully expect this to be confirmed by the Bangladesh government tests on our product which are expected to be released in the next few days.”

The Bangladesh Government is re-testing all major dairy brands in its market, after saying that a mix of negative and positive results from different laboratories on the same batches of infant formula had caused confusion.


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