Rural round-up

May 31, 2015

Red meat prices forty years ago – Allan Barber:

We could be forgiven for thinking nothing has changed in the last forty years with regard to meat schedule setting, if not actual price levels. But an address to the Ruakura Farmers Conference in 1975 by then chairman of the New Zealand meat Producers Board, Charles Hilgendorff, gives an interesting perspective on the industry at that time.

The Board’s overriding concern was price stabilisation whereby it sought to avoid excessive short term highs and lows, but it was not in favour of absolute stability because this would provide a misleading impression to producers. The Meat Board had been involved in price support for the past 20 years and, funded as it was by farmer levies, it saw the need to use levy funds to smooth prices within a range. When prices exceeded a certain trigger, the surplus would be withheld from producers to provide a buffer when prices dropped. . .

 Managing the dairy downturn – Keith Woodford:

It is still far from clear whether we have reached the bottom of the dairy price cycle. The Chinese seem to be coming back into the market but no one much else is. But even if prices do start to rise in the next few months, down on the farms things will be tight at least until Christmas.

There are considerable lags in the system between prices at the Global Dairy Trade auction, and the milk cheques that farmers receive. Hence the financial crunch is just coming on. . .

Scanning and tracking stock is key for Gypsy Day moves:

The key risk for farmers during this year’s June 1st Gypsy Day is ensuring that stock are accurately identified and tracked, says Michael Lee, Principal with Crowe Horwath in Invercargill.

One of the biggest days in the dairying calendar, Gypsy Day marks the start of the new season when farms are bought and sold, stock is transferred to new owners and new sharemilking contracts are signed. This year it will again fall on a Monday public holiday.

“Stock is the second-biggest investment for farmers after the farm itself,” said Mr Lee. . .

Farmers wanted to help NIWA:

NIWA is looking for farmers to help fine tune its latest development.
The National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research has developed new tools that can help farmers decide when to irrigate or fertilise. But it needs farmers to test out the tools to ensure they are as practical and easy to use as possible.

The first new tool is called NIWA IrriMet and will be demonstrated at the NIWA stand in the main pavilion at this year’s National Agricultural Fieldays. IrriMet follows the successful launch of FarmMet at last year’s Fieldays.

FarmMet is a tailored weather forecasting tool that provides accurate up-to-date forecasts specific to individual properties. It works by capturing data from climate stations closest to an individual farm and using that to tailor a forecast to farmers delivered straight to their computer. . .

Ballance farewells Warwick de Vere after 45 years:

Fertiliser industry stalwart, Warwick de Vere will leave Ballance Agri-Nutrients Mount Maunganui site for the last time on today [29 May], closing the door on a 45-year career with the co-operative.

Known by colleagues as a legend who “lives, breathes and eats fertiliser”, he joined the industry as a laboratory technician in 1970 at New Zealand Farmers Fertiliser, Te Papapa, one of Ballance’s legacy companies. That was the start of a career which spanned a number of technical and management roles spanning manufacturing, safety, distribution, sales, human resources and IT, culminating in various General Manager roles with the co-operative in the last 15 years. . .

Vet Club Merger Confirmed:

A merger between two of North Island’s Veterinary Clubs has been confirmed. Effective 1st of June, Anexa Animal Health and Farmers Vet Club (FVC Veterinary Services) will operate as one practice called Anexa FVC.

Chairman Brian Gordon said, “This merger provides a sustainable Vet Club model in the Waikato-Hauraki region for the future. Farmers Vet Club (t/a FVC Veterinary Services) was established in Ngatea in 1923 and the Morrinsville Vet Club (t/a Anexa Animal Health) was established in Morrinsville in 1939. These clubs were established by farmers, for farmers and the Boards of both clubs wish to ensure strong competition remains in the market for local farmers.” . . .

Rural Business Network Hub launches in Northland:

Rural business professionals in Northland will have an opportunity to develop their businesses and strengthen their networks with the launch of the Northland Rural Business Network Hub on June 16. Whangarei will host the inaugural event on Tuesday June 16 at the Whangarei Barge Showgrounds Events Centre.

The Rural Business Network provides an opportunity for rural-based business people to participate in events that will help them grow their business through networking and learning from others. RBN aims to connect innovative, motivated people from across the range of primary industry sectors with successful, experienced businessmen and women creating opportunities to share ideas, be inspired and learn by example. . .

Seeking new Holstein Friesian Genetic Leaders:

Holstein Friesian New Zealand and CRV Ambreed will team up again this year to select New Zealand’s next generation of top Holstein Friesian bulls for their joint sire proving programme, ‘Holstein Friesian Genetic Leaders’.

Recently celebrating 20 years, the joint venture was set up to source, prove and sell high merit genetics within New Zealand’s Holstein Friesian population and has helped to advance and develop the breed ever since. . .


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